Finally an alternative to incandescents?

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wrote:

Utter bullshit. The LEDs themselves, if cooled to the datgasheet numbers (probably 25C) will last 30KPOH but NOT as they're used in crap appliances. Let me know when yours actually last that long.
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I'll get back to you in a decade or so...
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wrote:

You do that. BTW, do you really run your light bulbs 8 hours a day, seven days a year? Look at all that power *YOU'RE* wasting!
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snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz;3053674 Wrote: > BTW, do you really run your light bulbs 8 hours a day, seven days a > year (sic) week? Look at all that power *YOU'RE* wasting!
That happens a lot more often that you might think, krw. In my case, I have the hallway lights in my building on 24 hours per day. That's a total of 21 light bulbs going 24/7. If I were to shut them off at night, then tenants would have to carry flashlights to find their apartment doors.
Also, in the winter here in Winnipeg, by the time you leave for work at 8:30 in the morning, the Sun is just starting to rise, and when you quit work at 4:30 in the afternoon, the Sun is setting. So, ALL of the time you're at home, the lights are on.
'Winnipeg, Canada - Sunrise, sunset, dawn and dusk times for the whole year - Gaisma' (http://www.gaisma.com/en/location/winnipeg.html )
That might seem like 8 hours of "daylight", but if you allow 1/2 hour for dawn and another 1/2 hour for dusk, you're down to 7 hours of BROAD "daylight" per day. And, your house lights are going to be on during dawn and dusk on Saturdays and Sundays cuz there's not enough light to see well by during those times.
So, that's 640,000 people in Winnipeg, or 200,000 homes (say) with their lights on at least 8 hours per day.
--
nestork


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On Sat, 27 Apr 2013 02:53:02 +0200, nestork

Code here is hallways must be lit. Good candidate for long lasting lamps.
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Hardly an application where color or start up time matters. Of course, that wasn't the issue at hand.
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On Friday, April 26, 2013 11:16:55 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's dumb. Why light a space with no humans in it?
When we lived in Europe none of the hallways or stairways were lit. There were two different approaches. In some, like hotels, you hit a switch at t he door that started a timer. In others a motion detector started a timer. Either way you weren't lighting an empty stairway or hallway.
No, it's not a huge amount of energy. But if there's no point to lighting something, why do it?
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On 5/9/2013 9:21 AM, TimR wrote:

In the U.S. it's likely to be a fire safety issue in commercial, institutional, multistory and multifamily housing buildings. In the past, I'm sure there was loss of life because people couldn't see where they were going to evacuate a building. We have the lighted EXIT signs and emergency lights to light hallways and stairwells whenever power is lost and most businesses and restaurants have a light fixture or two that have one bulb that stays lit as a night light. When I had a long warehouse building for my business, I installed two 9 watt fluorescent light fixtures that stayed on all the time and I could see my way 200 feet from the front to the back door without turning on the main lighting. I don't like tripping over things. I like the new LED lights that I can install for night lights knowing the darn things will outlast me. ^_^
TDD
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I should clarify. I'm talking about hallways in multi family swellings or apartment buildings, not a home. It is a safety issue. I don't know if motion detectors would be allowed or not, but it would have to have good coverage so a light would be on no matter where a person would be stepping into the hall.
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I think most of us understood that.
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Lights are cheaper than attorneys and law suits. Especially in muti family swellings. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .

I think most of us understood that.
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wrote:

Motion sensors have a real issue in smoke and where there's a source of heat, too. Elevators are famous for delivering people to the fire. Though I don't know for a fact, I wouldn't be at all surprised if they weren't allowed in this amplification.
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On Friday, April 26, 2013 11:16:55 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That's dumb. Why light a space with no humans in it?
When we lived in Europe none of the hallways or stairways were lit. There were two different approaches. In some, like hotels, you hit a switch at the door that started a timer. In others a motion detector started a timer. Either way you weren't lighting an empty stairway or hallway.
No, it's not a huge amount of energy. But if there's no point to lighting something, why do it?
------------------
The motion detectors are the way to go for both function and minimum energy use. The timers don't usually allow for slow walkers -- older people, for instance -- and they leave you in the dark when you come out of your door.
OK, I live there and I'll carry a flashlight; but it's not good to leave a visiting granny in the dark.
Tomsic
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That is why you buy an occupancy sensor. It continues to be re triggered every time it sees motion and times out after the last movement detected. You can usually set the time out up to fifteen or twenty minutes. I have a light and fan connected to one in the bathrooms. I also have an occupancy sensor in the hall triggering some rope in the crown and another one in the kitchen triggering under kick and soffit lights. It is enough to get a drink of water or even fix a sandwich. Because of the layout, you can see to walk around in the living room and dining room from this light. There is also one in the rec room so anywhere you go in the house is lit when you get there (except the sleeping rooms) When you leave, the lights go off.
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On 5/9/2013 11:01 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have a problem with those darn things in restrooms. The cursed things turn the light out before I'm done dropping a load of readymix but I have several flashlights on my person at all times when I'm out somewhere, especially when I'm working. ^_^
TDD
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On Thu, 09 May 2013 11:27:51 -0500, The Daring Dufas

They're just telling you that you have to work faster.
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One locksmith I worked with. Says he is sure to take a couple esxtra rolls of TP into the stall. When the lights go out, he throws rolls of TP over the stall, in the direction of the sensor light. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
I have a problem with those darn things in restrooms. The cursed things turn the light out before I'm done dropping a load of readymix but I have several flashlights on my person at all times when I'm out somewhere, especially when I'm working. ^_^
TDD
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I have a problem with those darn things in restrooms. The cursed things turn the light out before I'm done dropping a load of readymix but I have several flashlights on my person at all times when I'm out somewhere, especially when I'm working. ^_^
TDD
Just read some proposed rules for ceiling fans controls. One calls for mandating a motion or occupancy sensor for turning the fan on when someone enters a room, but leaving it off when the room is empty. OK; but what about a bedroom with a sleeping person or two trying to keep cool on a hot night? Do I have to wake up and wave my arm at the sensor every few minutes?
Tomsic
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On 5/9/2013 4:10 PM, = wrote:

The darn ceiling fan is supposed to equalize room temperature, it would defeat the purpose to have it turn off. o_O
TDD
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On Friday, May 10, 2013 12:42:52 AM UTC-4, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Do people here ever trim a post? Sigh. At least most are bottom posting.
I do not believe ceiling fans actually do anything except make people think they're more comfortable when they're not. It's psychological. So as lon g as they're running when you're in the room, that's fine. When you're not in the room, the motor is just adding heat.
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