Energy Star program gone?

"Moving aggressively to make good on election promises to slash the federal budget, the House GOP today unveiled an eye-popping plan to eliminate $2.5 trillion in spending over the next 10 years... Some of the proposed reductions will surely draw Democratic attack, such as cutting the Ready to Learn TV Program, repeal of the Davis-Bacon Act, the elimination of the Energy Star Program, and cutting subsidies to the Woodrow Wilson Center."
Inasmuch as the Energy Star program relies on the manufacturer's word, eliminating the program reduces the temptation to lie.
http://www.usnews.com/news/washington-whispers/articles/2011/01/20/house-gop-lists-25-trillion-in-spending-cuts
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On Thu, 20 Jan 2011 11:49:51 -0600, "HeyBub"

Early on, I thought that the Energy Star program was a program designed to push appliance manufacturers into designing their products to be more energy efficient.
However, I'm beginning to get the idea that the Energy Star program is designed to sell more appliances by convincing folks that the appliance they bought last year (or last month!) must now be replaced.
At a local appliance store with lots of new televisions for sale, I see that one 12" LCD TV has an Energy Star rating of 3.5, whereas one 48" LCD TV has an Energy Star rating of 4.5.
And the Energy Star folks are touting that automatic dishwashers are more efficient than hand-washing dishes. But if you run it to ground, they are basing that on just two tests, one of which I couldn't find any data, and the other which I could only find the most general info about the test, and very opinionated summary of the results.
I wonder if we wouldn't save a lot more if there were no new appliances to be had--we just make do with what we've got, and fix them as needed.
--
croy

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?

Energy Star aside, there are many test showing you use less water to use the machine with a fairly full load versus hand washing. The Star just takes it to a higher level as the newer machine use even less water than older ones.
.

If you take the cradle to grave scenario, yes it often pays to continue to use the old. A few eyars back, I replaced a troublesome old small second refrigerator with a new larger frost free model and my electric consumption dropped $10 a month. Not a bad payback on a $400 box, but if it was the main kitchen fridge at $1500, that is much too long for just energy as the factor.
My new oil fire boiler is saving about 330 gallons of oil a year. Still a long payback, but it is paying its own way.
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