Dumped Peroxide on lawn

I accidentally dumped a gallon of hydrogen peroxide on my lawn. It's the farm rated 35% type. It had a mountain of foam bubbles and was very hot. Earth worms were popping out of the ground and turning white before dying. I finally hosed it to dilute it.
Now I have a dead spot on the lawn, grass is all brown. Does anyone know if I can just loosen the dirt and reseed, or must I remove the dirt and replace it?
Thanks
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On Fri, 03 Jul 2009 22:19:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Hydrogen peroxide decomposes quickly when dirty. It becomes oxygen and plain water during the bleaching action. Your peroxide was quite potent, but you can plant now.
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wrote:

Agree. Should be safe to plant almost as soon as the ground stopped burbling. Should be quite sterile then. Don't advertise having that explosive around in gallon quantities.
--
Best regards
Han
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On Fri, 03 Jul 2009 22:19:40 -0500, against all advice, something compelled snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com, to say:

You could dump an entire bag of Scott's Turf Builder on it . . .
Seriously, though, why don't you just reseed and see if it works. Seed is pretty cheap, and if it fails you can always go the remove and replace route.
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wrote:

Outlook for the worms is not good though.
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Red Green wrote:

Agreed, but neighbourhood worms in an adjacent overpopulated space will find a vacant plot pretty soon.
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You'd think so wouldn't you? But, completely off topic, I used to have a whole lot of aquaria (I know, I would have usually wrote "aquariums" but I thought I'd cut off the spelling police on that one at least :) ). One summer day I awoke to a glorious rain shower and "oodles" (scientific term there) of eathworms on the driveway, sidewalk, street, evereywhere. I collected several hundred and over the course of a week or so few my fish well. That summer I had an amazing number of fish spawn, but the earthworm count in my lawn never seemed to be the same.
Curious that. I know that most of the worms I collected would never have made it back into the lawn and would have perished but it seems sort of odd that the population in the lawn dropped so severely.
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Doug Brown wrote:

Maybe thay just caught on to you and were too smart to be taken after your initial attack.
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Kinda sad how few people grasp even the basics of chemistry, huh?
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On Fri, 03 Jul 2009 22:19:40 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

What do farmers use 35% peroxide for? Do they all like to be blond?
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Still Just Me. wrote:

Remember to story of the farmer who built a rocket?
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@stillnodomains.com says...

It's food grade - perfectly safe. It makes a sterilizing wash for food handling systems for milk, cheese, eggs, etc. I use it to clean stained pottery. People brush their teeth with it (diluted). There is a whole culture based on 35% food grade peroxide, as a quick search will show.
Now the 98% we had at work (NASA), that's rocket fuel. We moved a drum of it once and the bung was slightly open, as each drop spattered on the asphalt, a tiny burst of flame was observed.
--
Dennis


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it's an oxidizer. H2O2.
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wrote:

Is it available at the local level? I'd heard of it used for bleaching wood stains out, but the 3% solution they sell at CVS doesn't do much except remove organic matter.
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DT wrote:

The guys who play with rocket backpacks usually distill their own from lower concentrations they obtain on the open market. I doubt any regular Joe could buy the 98% stuff. Heck, I wouldn't even try. The more pure it is the more stable it is but golly it can be dangerous.
http://www.tecaeromex.com/ingles/destilai.html
TDD
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote in wrote:

Well, you said it became foamy and hot. The stuff we have in the lab has to be stored in an explosion-proof fridge, even the 10 ounce bottle.
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Han
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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

"Hydrogen peroxide vapors can form sensitive contact explosives with hydrocarbons such as greases. Hazardous reactions ranging from ignition to explosion have been reported with alcohols, ketones, [etc.]."
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