Door sizes

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On 02/29/2016 5:52 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I'm thinking he's trying to replace wood w/ steel just reading sorta' between the multiple responses and inferring...and was hoping to just hang a slab in place.
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On 2/29/2016 4:42 PM, dpb wrote:

You're missing the point.
It doesn't matter whether I'm looking to replace just the slab (reusing existing frame) *or* replacing the entire frame (with a prehung unit) -- if the RO is sized too narrow!
The remedy available to me is to replace/revise the buck; or, fabricate a thinner jamb (assuming that to be a cheaper solution than a custom 35.5" metal door).
I'm not keen on letting this turn into another long-winded back-and-forth where we play 20 questions and roam around visiting all sorts of different issues that MAY or MAY NOT be pertinent.
"A stock 36 inches door is 36 inches -- whether a slab or (effectively) when prepackaged in a prehung jamb"
That's all I need to know to sort out what I have to do...
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On 03/01/2016 9:44 AM, Don Y wrote: ...

Excepting it already has in large part owing to your reluctance to outline the actual objective and specifics of the condition.
We've already established that nominal 36" doors aren't necessarily either 36" _or_ 35.5" and that you can undoubtedly find either. That still leaves open all the other dimensions and details that are just as important as far as what would have to be done to make a swap.
I'd think the likelihood the RO is too narrow pretty low but it is possible, yes. Have you done enough exploratory work to know what the RO dimensions actually are? You may be making mountains from molehills and the simplest solution is to simply rip out the old and put in a new prehung stock unit.
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On 3/1/2016 9:07 AM, dpb wrote:

I can trace the grout lines to know how large the opening in the *masonry* is. I can see where the door "begins". I can do simple math to determine how wide the buck+frame are.
I can then examine the "assembled dimensions" of prehung doors to see how they would fit.
Ripping out the old leaves me with a large, person sized hole in the house that needs to be filled before the next nightfall. I'm sure as hell not keen on doing that just to "gather data".
I'm an engineer; I can look at numbers on a piece of paper and sort out how things will (or won't!) work without having to "try it and see!"
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Another complication: we lived in Europe for a while courtesy of (er, at the order of) my employer at the time.
Those German doors did not just swing into the jamb. They overlapped. Twice. There was a double jog in the jamb and a double overlap on the door.
Wish I could get one like that here.
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On Tue, 01 Mar 2016 09:28:46 -0700, Don Y

The easiest way to determine a masonry R/O is to drill a small hole in the jamb near the stop and probe with a wire. You can easily fill that hole and make it disappear if you decide not to replace the jambs. You might find there is quite a bit of bucking in that opening.
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On 03/01/2016 10:50 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

+42
Nobody said rip the whole thing out; it's unlikely to the max the RO wasn't plenty for a "standard" door and guessing from the exterior fill isn't much for uncovering what is actually there.
Sometimes even we engineers need to do lab work, not count of design drawings... :)
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On Tuesday, March 1, 2016 at 3:43:37 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

I'd just pull the trim molding off to see the RO. Assuming he's replacing the door, it has to come off anyhow. But then again, the scope of the actual project hasn't been stated. It's almost certainly a RO where you can find a replacement door to fit, there are probably a lot of choices.
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On 03/01/2016 2:51 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Yeah, me too. The hole thru the jamb isn't all that reliable in that you'll hit whatever blocking is there and not know for certain whether it's fill or actual framing...I was simply pointing out to OP that the best answer isn't necessarily the answer to the question asked and likely isn't going to come from analysis/documentation but experiment/observation instead.
Of course, if he were to simply take existing slab measurements including those of other specifics outlined and went with those to the local purveyor of goods... :)
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You know, stock doors are designed to be installed in standard rough openings. The rough opening is just that. Rough. The installer will measure the door (and if pre-hung, the jamb) and shim and jamb out the rough opening appropriately for the door.
Occasionally, the rough opening is not large enough for a stock door - in which case either a custom door is ordered ($$$) or a stock door is cut down (taking care that the lock stile width and the hinge stile width remain visually consistent and wide enough to mount the lockset).
It's not that difficult a concept, really.
My rough opening is about 64 inches, with shims and jambs the finished (jamb to jamb) opening is 60 inches for a double door, which makes each door approximately 30 inches wide (absent the bevel on the lock stile).
Fit your door to the rough opening, moving the jambs as necessary if you're only 1/2" off.
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On 2/29/2016 2:39 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

You can't make bigger without redoing the buck!
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On 2/29/2016 4:47 PM, Don Y wrote:

I rub my handle and it grows a half inch.
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In typed:

Good catch. Yes, a typo. I meant 83 3/4, not 79 3/4, for this situation.
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On 2/29/2016 9:35 AM, Don Y wrote:

I'd be interested how many neighbors allow you to tape measure their doors.
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why not trim the door down by 1/4 inch on each side>
You haven't mentioned the height of the doors, either.
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On 2/29/2016 8:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

Hard to trim METAL!
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On Monday, February 29, 2016 at 10:50:59 AM UTC-5, Don Y wrote:

No, it's not. BTDT
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On Monday, February 29, 2016 at 10:58:54 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I'll rephrase...It's not hard to trim metal - in general - but it might be hard to trim the *width* of a metal door.
My BTDT referred to trimming the height of a steel door.
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On Mon, 29 Feb 2016 08:49:36 -0700, Don Y

You will find they are all going to be a half inch smaller than the nominal size
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On Monday, February 29, 2016 at 11:36:33 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I tend to think that Don is either asking the wrong question or hasn't provided enough information.
If he plans to replace just the door itself, then maybe his question is OK. If he is planning on replacing the door and the jamb, then I think that he should determine the RO measurements and then shop for a pre-hung door armed with that information.
For a pre-hung door, he could measure his actual door and the actual doors of every one in his neighborhood and still not know what to buy for his house.
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