Do I really need 200 A main service?

Page 2 of 6  
On Mon, 06 Dec 2010 19:54:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Electric cars were a "mature technology" in 1915

My electric ran on lead-acid batteries and a DC motor, just like an old Baker. The cost for equivalent range on LiOn batteries would be over 5o times as high, and they were not available when I had mine. The chager would be more expensive too.
For the same weight, the range would have been WAY more, along with the price.
Newer motor control systems are a lot more efficient too - and a top line PWM FET controller today is about half the price an old GE SCR or ALLIS Transistorized controller was in the '80s. (and a lot smaller, lighter, and more efficient - with more features)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Dec 2010 21:20:47 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I agree the technology can take advantage of better batteries and better motors but the payback still is way out there ... assuming you never wreck it.
The two ton elephant in the room is still the heat and the air conditioner. Where are you getting 20,000 BTUH? That is about what a regular HAVC system is, both ways. In a permanently temperate climate you may be able to just open the windows but you are not driving where water freezes or anywhere in the sun belt. Actually most of the US population thinks A/C is a must in the summer.
Your $50,000 Volt might be like a 56 Morgan. Fun to drive on a nice spring day but you are not going out in the snow.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/6/2010 10:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I do seem to remember the old air cooled VW Beetle having an option for a gasoline burning auxiliary heater for those really cold climates. I suppose a propane heater for the new electric cars and perhaps a big insulated compartment for ice to use to air condition them in warmer weather. People seem to forget the simplest details when it comes to alternative energy used for transportation. :-)
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a remote starter on my car and often warm it up 3 to 5 minutes in the morning. I doubt the electrics can do that, unless they have a plug in heater. That remote is really a nice gadget when the temperature is in the teens or lower.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Dec 2010 19:54:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In looking around I don't see much big bucks going to fix Prius battery problems. Don't know much about them, but my curiosity about their batteries got me looking on the net. I see "rebuilt" batteries going for $500. I don't really want to know any more. The only pure electrics I see coming on line are the Leaf and Tesla. The Volt had a big advantage over them, since it can be run as electric only, but the engine gives it unlimited range. Pretty sure the target audience is the same - those with short commutes and low daily mileage. I don't see why a person who often puts +100 daily miles on a car would buy any of them, but some will, and push them past what they're intended for. We'll see what attracts a bigger market and how they pan out.

Think I read the Volt won't go below +60% of charge before the management kicks in the IC.

Economy of scale has to kick in. Until H Ford started the assembly line hardly anybody could afford a car. Maybe that got charcoal and BBQ going good too. From a little seed, a big tree...
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Dec 2010 21:36:42 -0600, Vic Smith

I think there is a lawyer tax built into the price of batteries that will only get worse. You can also call it "environmental cost" if it makes you feel better ;-)
Batteries always involve troublesome processes and exotic chemicals. It is the nature of the magic that lets you put the power of a couple gallons of gasoline in a little box. We use oil because it seems to be the best way to carry a lot of power around.
Maybe the whole prob;em would have been solved if Tesla's idea of beaming power right to you actually worked.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I said the same thing about cell phones and hybrids. Only got a cell phone a few years ago, when they got cheap to buy and use. Hybrids are about 3% of new cars sales now. The same buyers will want the plug-in models. I expect that will grow as they get cheaper to buy, especially plug-in hybrids like the Volt. Ford will also be a plug-in hybrid player next year, and Toyota is going to start producing a plug-in Prius. Though I'll probably be dead before they get in my car price range, plug-ins will be a bigger chunk of the car market as time goes by. There are already gov tax credits around for charging stations.
With free gov money people go all out to get it. Just like the fat-ass jokers I used to work with would go to bars to wolf down free appetizers. They knew all the "free food" schedules. Never understood eating lousy food just because it was free. Maybe I'm anti-social? Nah, just know good food from junk.
Though some people pooh-pooh the idea of the 40 mile electric range of the Volt, I think GM has a winner with the concept - if it's not a dog otherwise. If as advertised, the daily 40 miles would serve 95% of our driving needs just plugging into 110v. And the other 5% would have the IC engine running. That's 100%. Our commute is 24 miles round trip daily. It could be a winner with twice the commute. There are millions of folks with the same car needs as us.
Only thing that will hamper Volt sales is continued high price or if it's a maintenance hog. Time will tell.
--Vic
.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

believed that they had a "winner", they wouldn't have to come up with a secret, convoluted formula for figuring MPG's @ 230

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With the OP's question, I got curious on what is actually involved in upgrading from 150 to 200A. I looked at my bmain breaker and it had a 200 main breaker inside. Is the upgrade just changing the main breaker or doe the entire panel uually have to be upgraded?
RE: the electriv vehicle comments, I have a 5.9L v-8 in a 1500 Dodge Ram to haul loads of construction and landscaping material. I just can't imagine a electric vehicle that will handle that unless I haul miles of extension cables.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good for you. I can't imagine owning your Ram. Just shows neither of us have any imagination. BTW, I hauled tons of material in my Ford pickup with a 352.. Later I hauled even more tons of material in a Chevy Corsica with a little 2.2. In the trunk, back seat and tied to a roof rack. No good for furniture and appliances though. Those I usually got with free delivery or paid 50 bucks. Nobody says you have to buy an electric vehicle and nobody can tell me to buy a Ram. Different strokes. I love America! BTW, here's something to get your imagination going. Probably pie in the sky but who knows? http://gm-volt.com/2009/03/02/gm-considering-extended-range-electric-pickup-truck /
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
when gasoline gets over 4 bucks what remains of our economy will collapse.
high oil prices had a big part in our collapse
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

http://gm-volt.com/2009/03/02/gm-considering-extended-range-electric-pickup-truck /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

With the OP's question, I got curious on what is actually involved in upgrading from 150 to 200A. I looked at my bmain breaker and it had a 200 main breaker inside. Is the upgrade just changing the main breaker or doe the entire panel uually have to be upgraded?
To upgrade the service , it requires replacing the panel, cable feeding the panel from the utility company connection, and replacing the grounding system
RE: the electriv vehicle comments, I have a 5.9L v-8 in a 1500 Dodge Ram to haul loads of construction and landscaping material. I just can't imagine a electric vehicle that will handle that unless I haul miles of extension cables.
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Check out the engines on trains. If they take the diesel electric design and adapt it to a pickup, it can be done. Cost is the issue. There are large electric vehicles operating in other industries too. My guess is we will not ever see it, but I'd never say it cannot be done.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/05/2010 07:32 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

GM is making hybrid pickups, which seem to be a much better idea than a hybrid car, as the excess weight isn't nearly as much of a liability in a truck, nor are truck buyers necessarily looking for nimble handling. I don't think it ever had a Diesel version though.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Weight is important in trucks used as trucks (and being heavier they will require more batteries). Also space is generally more of a premium than it is in a "commuter".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1. You don't need 95% market share of anything to succeed. 2. Yes, the product has to be solid. 3. Yes, the Volt is being subsidized, as was the Toyota Prius and all the high efficiency furnaces they're talking about in another thread. 4. GM is making a profit. 5. The EPA determines MPG figures, not GM. And it's not 230 MPG.
So you're batting .400. In baseball they'd call you Ted Williams and you'd be a hero. With most work it just gets your ass fired.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

anything that cuts our importing of crude oil, espically from the mid east is a good thing.....
our mucking about in those countries business over oil is largely why terrorism exists.....
just look at wiki leaks, and what our country has been up to
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, right. If we just put our head in the sand or better yet just be nice and kiss their asses as much as we can, all those radical muslims will just go away. Obama's been doing that for about 2 years now and has zippo to show for it. If the world were NOT buying oil from "those countries", then you'd be blaming the US for terrorism, because the countries had no decent economies. Yet those Islamic extremists exist in countries like Saudi Arabia that have oil and Yemen that do not. They seem to thrive in the UK too. Is that because of their North Sea oil?
Face it. There is evil in the world, whether it's in the form of islamic extremists or just nut jobs like North Korea, which doesn't have a pot to piss in, yet they have built an atom bomb and long range missles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If Toyota only made the Prius, they'd be out of business It's way too early to know if GM is really making a profit. The EPA hasn't yet figured out how they're going to figure MPG's for this type of vehicle, so all kinds of numbers are being used currently
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.