costco honda generator

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Look into one of the venerable Onan CCK's or even a newer NH or BG Series. They were built in 3 to 5 Kw Models, and can be had for less One Kilobuck, easily. Lots of these came from Motorhomes, that have died and gone to Motorhome Heaven. Usually have less than 3000 Hours on them, which is 1/3 their Primary Lifetime, with proper Periodic Maintainance. they run at 1800 Rpm, and actually the older ones, without the PCB Engine Controls, and better, and more reliable than the newer ones. Next up in class are Onan J Series Gensets, that come both in Gas, and Diesel, Versions, as well as Air and Water Cooled versions. The Gas Fueled versions come in Twin 6.5Kw,and Quad cyl. 12.5Kw versions, that are easily converted to Dry Gas fuel. If your in to Diesels, the J Series Onans are the ones to look for. They come in Single 3Kw, Twin 6.5Kw, and Quad 12.5Kw versions. Onan built Marine Versions of ALL the J Series Gensets, and these are easily setup for CoGen type operations. They also built Radiator Cooled version of both the Gas and Diesel Powered gensets in various configurations. I bought a number of 3Kw Diesel J Series Gensets, all for less than $500US, both Air and Water Cooled, and fellow gave me an air Cooled 6.5Kw Diesel this spring, just for hauling it away, and I live far out in the Alaskan Bush, where there aren't a lot of these around. Look around where you live on eBay and CraigList, Onan built thousands of these each year, for about three decades, so there are a pile still out there kicking around, and most folks have no clue, what they are, or what they are worth, to the right folks, who do.....
--
Bruce in alaska
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wrote:

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Wow, thanks very much for the specific information. I'm on craig's list now and they seem to start out at about $400.
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FYI, my home standby generator is a 70's- era Onan 4CCK that once was a standby generator for a traffic signal. They are pretty simple to work on, parts and information are still generally available, and the gang at the Onan board at Smokstak.com (including Bruce) gives amazing support.
Vaughn
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On Wed, 15 Jul 2009 17:07:22 -0400, "vaughn"

I'm not up on the Onan model numbers, but if anyone is talking about the old opposed-twin flat heads for a backup generator, I wouldn't think those would be a great choice except for low-use applications. My neighbor was fond of them because he could get them for peanuts, which was a good thing because he seemed to have gone through quite a few. They didn't seem especially reliable, quiet, or fuel efficient. I'd think that the fuel inefficiency alone of flat-heads makes them uneconomical for extended use. I'm not even sure that the 1800 RPM is any great advantage. Better 3600 RPM engines last a long time if properly cared for, and one can throttle most engines down to a lower speed if planned for.
It seems like there are lots of decent small engines available these days, some so cheap that even the most budget-conscious could afford to have a complete spare on hand.
9hp, $150 http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID 09071517085539&item(-1676&catname=engines 13hp, $180 http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID 09071517085539&item(-1678&catname=engines Wayne
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http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID 09071517085539&item(-1676&catname=engines

http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID 09071517085539&item(-1678&catname=engines

Neither of those engines will fit on a generator. You need an engine with a tapered shaft to replace the engine on a generator. Unless you have a belt driven generator head. See ebay sale #110406409961 and look at the shaft.
Richard W.
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Seeing as we're talking about generators I have a question. I've read, from a few places' that small generators should be "exercised" at least once a month. I'm assuming that means run with a load on the generator. Why is that ??? Will the generator screw up if it isn't used frequently ???
Thanks Brian
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There are two things that can happen to small generators if not occasionally "exercised".
1) The generator can lose its residual magnetism. If this happens, it will run but fail to produce power. There are various ways to "flash" the generator field to remagnetize the generator.
2) Engines, particularly carbureted gasoline engines, can gum up, or parts can rust up if they are allowed to sit for a long time.
Read your generator's manual. There are probably storage instructions. Follow them!
Vaughn
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Brian wrote:

All the stationary backup generators I've installed were setup to crank and run for 15 minutes once a week. The newer Generac models run at half speed during test mode in order to make less noise. The weekly test keeps the generator ready for use at a moments notice. The homeowner can do a load test, if they desire, by turning off the main feed to the circuits covered by the genset. As for small portable generators, you always use fuel stabilizer/ treatment if it's a gasoline or diesel powered. One good reason for a monthly test is it will cook or blow out any critters that decide to take up residence. A monthly test will also keep the corrosion down by splashing oil around the crankcase and boiling away any water that may have condensed on internal and external surfaces. Getting the generator portion warm will also drive out any moisture that may have collected. You could use an electric heater for a load since it would mimic the load bank that a genset service company would use.
TDD
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Contrary to popular belief, Diesel Fuel does NOT require ANY Stabilizer... as long as it is Clean, in the first place, and not sucking water into it, in the second place. Water will be taken out of the fuel, by the Primary and Secondary Fuel Filters. So as long as it (water) is minimal, it goes away, when you change the Filters.
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You wrote:

Since I'm not the world's leading expert on the subject, I have to ask those who are. Like these:
http://tinyurl.com/lm7xl2
http://www.batterystuff.com/tutorial_fuel_storage.html
http://theepicenter.com/tow021799.html
Granted, many sources are biased toward their own products but looking through multiple sources one can ferret out the real information they all have in common.
TDD
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You can be Daring, all you want, with your own opinions. That is called Free Speech, but when you spout Crap, people who know can always smell the stink.....
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You wrote:

You obviously understood nothing I wrote. I explained that I'm not the world's leading expert on the subject and can only write about my own extensive experience with generators which includes the very small to a few large EMD systems. Most of my experience is with gasoline and natural gas powered systems. I have limited experience with diesel powered units and have never had to tear down and repair a diesel engine. My experience on diesel gensets is limited to maintenance of the engine and repairs to the various electrical and electronic assemblies. I once had to repair the voltage regulator from a GM Delco 20kw diesel genset that was in the hold of our 100 foot crew boat in The Marshall Islands. I took the regulator to the island TV shop and discovered a thermal intermittent caused by a defective unijunction transistor on the circuit board. I was able to find a close match in the stock of TV repair parts and fix the problem. That was 20 years ago and I've repaired more than a few since then. Please include a source to your allegations of my ignorance since I'm not the world's leading expert and would very much like to learn as much as I can.
TDD
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Well, I, for one, agree with this "You" fellow, in that Stabilizer isn't needed in Diesel Fuel, for the operation of Diesel Engines. I have 40+ years of operating, maintaining, and generating ALL my own power, out here in the bush of Alaska, mostly with diesel fueled Gensets. I have burned diesel fuel that was left over for WWII, and was over 40 years old at the time of use. It was in sealed 55USG Drums, found in an old Military Bunker. Burned just fine, with no difference in generating capacity noted during the run. If you have clean diesel going in to your tank, and keep the water out of the tank, diesel will store basically "Forever". I have a 250KUSG TankFarm, that we fill every fall, and the diesel is just as good in the spring, as it was, when it was pumped in the previous Fall. Some of the fuel in those tanks may be 2 or 3 years old, before it gets used. Never had a problem in 40 years, except ONCE, when we got a Barge Load, with bugs in the fuel. We had to biocide three tanks, and so did every other customer that got a delivery from that Barge, that trip. All paid for, by the distributer, and a BIG Apology, for delivering Bad Fuel. We don't get the GasOhol Crap that the Feds force on you Flatlanders, as the barge can only carry one Grade of Gasoline, and it needs to be FAA Certified for 80/86 Low Lead AVGAS, so we don't have to deal with most of the Gasoline problems you guys do. Our #1 Diesel is JetA50, as well, so we always get the "Good Stuff" from the Distributer, rather than the slop they pump to the Consumer Sales places.
--
Bruce in alaska
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Bruce in alaska wrote:

I also agree that diesel doesn't need stabilizer like the gasoline that it's meant for. The information I have indicates that newer diesel blends aren't as good as the older blends because of government mandated emission standards. Hell, you guys in Alaska know more about diesel generators and small airplanes than any other Americans for obvious reasons. It wouldn't surprise me if you didn't get fuel from Russia from some folks who also know what works in the God awful cold. I would imagine that the 40 year old diesel fuel you found was not kept in a warm environment. I think the problems I faced with diesel fuel in a tropical climate may not plague you in your somewhat less tropical climate in Alaska. We had extreme humidity and condensation to deal with and tried to keep things warm to drive moisture out of equipment. Bugs love the tropics. By the way, correct me if I'm wrong but isn't jet fuel blended with additives to prevent gelling or microbe infestation since jet fuel is often exposed to environmental extremes?
TDD
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Many years ago, sometime in the eighties. I met a fellow who told me he ran out of gas one night, along the road. A trucker stopped by to help. they drained a couple galons of diesel out of the truck tank, and poured into the car. The car ran very poorly, but did run.
Like you say, wouldn't totally surprise me if Alaskans bought fuel from Russia. More likely, Russians come over to buy fuel. Since supply problems used to be epidemic in Mother Russia. Like how medical care is a problem in Canada, and they come to Michigan.
Wasn't there something about jet fuel, they wanted to add a jelly something so that if a plane crashed, the fuel didn't atomize and make an explosive mist?
--
Christopher A. Young
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Nope, "Jet Fuel" as you call it is JetA50, and is the same thing a #1 Diesel, Home Heating Oil, and a few other names. The difference is, that to be classed JetA50, and sold for Aviation Fuel, it MUST be Filtered to FAA Spec, and be within the Specific Gravity, FAA Spec. So, what the Distributer does, is he has only one Grade of #1 Diesel in his tanks and when he pumps it for Transport to a customer, it goes thru a different set of filtering for Aviation, than for Home Heating, or #1 Diesel, but it all comes from the SAME Tank. With #2 Diesel, in cold climates, they have what is called "Winter Mix" where the Distributer will mix #1 and #2 Diesel, to lower the GellPoint of the fuel when loading the Truck or Barge, for deliveries starting about August, and increase the Ratio of #1 to #2 the farther North and away from the coast the fuel is destine for. For Gasoline, the distributer will have an "Additive Package" that they add to the Tank when dispatching a Load, designed for the prospective customer. Many times Shell, Chevron, and Mobile Gas Stations, will get their fuel from the same Distributer or supplier and the only difference in the fuel is the "Additive Package" put in, as the basic fuel, ALL COMES FROM THE SAME TANK. Depends on who owns the Refinery, or where the Distributer bough his fuel from, the last time. I have seen the same truck at two or three different Brand Gas Stations, in town, on the same day, delivering fuel. the distributer is 250 miles away, so you know they didn't fill the truck three times that day.
--
Bruce in alaska
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Bruce in alaska wrote:

Cool, thanks for the information. Makes a lot of sense to carry just one type of fuel that will work for everything especially when space and facilities are limited. The same additive package mixing at the petroleum distributors goes on here too. It's quite interesting how that's handled but I'm guessing there is a greater variety of fuel types to be had down here in Alabamastan. When I've talked to the guys who drive the gasoline delivery trucks they've told me about the compartmentalized tank trailer with so many thousand gallons per compartment. They will have a load for one brand in one compartment and another brand for the next station in the next compartment (different additives). Many people think it's just one big homogeneous load in the tank behind the truck. I always thought and have heard that "jet" fuel was kerosene, a much lighter fuel than diesel and that truck drivers would mix kerosene with diesel in cold weather so their trucks would run. I know the military has vehicles equipped with multi fuel engines and am curious as to what exactly they'll run on. I understand that M1 Abrams tank with it's turbine engine shares the fuel supply with the helicopters but heck it will probably run on peanut oil. By the way have you guys got the Toshiba Micro Nuclear Reactor yet? I read about an installation planned for somewhere in Alaska.
TDD
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wrote:

This should clarify what aviation fuel is and isn't
http://www.chevron.com/products/ourfuels/prodserv/fuels/documents/aviation_fuels.pdf
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Worn Out Retread wrote:

http://www.chevron.com/products/ourfuels/prodserv/fuels/documents/aviation_fuels.pdf

Thanks for the link, it clarified some of what I've heard.
TDD
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Bruce in alaska wrote:

My buddy has a liquid fuels business and I have seen the tanks and pumping systems at multiple fuel dumps and they all had a totally separate tank for Jet A if Jet A was delivered from that facility. In my area there are two huge fuel dumps but the Jet A used at the local airports is trucked in on transports from another state. Also there isn't a tank called "#1 diesel". They have multiple tanks for ULSD and LSD and kerosene.
With #2 Diesel, in cold

It is more complicated than that. Certain additives are required and certain additives are optional. They have an array of injector pumps that meter in the additives when the truck is on the loading rack according to what the customer purchased.
Many times Shell, Chevron, and

All truck tankers have bulkheads to form multiple compartments. That adds strength and limits spillage in case the tanker is damaged and it also allows them to haul different product in each compartment if they want.
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