Cordless Tools - Another SUCKER PRODUCT

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Certainly. NiCds should only be used in high current, frequently used applications.

Maybe it is a good idea for the average home owner. As you point out, this use is a killer on NiCds.

I can't remember the last time I had a device ruined because of electrolyte leakage. It must be a couple or three decades, at least. I use the $.20 (100/$20) Lowes specials, now, too.

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jw wrote:

I agree with your main point, but not the rest. I don't buy any cordless tools for the reason that batteries last for at best, a few years.
When I pay my good hard earned money for a tool, I expect it to last forever. I have enough heavy duty extension cord to reach every corner of my 1/3 acre lot.
Batteries run down, but corded tools run continuously until the job is done. Batteries eventually die, and fail to hold a charge. The replacements batteries tend to cost about as much as the tool, and that is before the battery becomes obsolete and rare.
That said, this isn't a one size fits all world.
Many find the cordless convenience to be worth the cost. Nothing wrong with that.
And if I were a professional, one who makes service calls, there is no question that the time saved would make the batteries pay for themselves.
--
Tony Sivori
Due to spam, I'm filtering all Google Groups posters.
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wrote:

What he said. I have 4 various corded. Used mid to low price cordless for a few years and they were fine. Then the batteries wouldn't hold a good charge or take a charge. Just too stupid to me when I always have an outlet to plug into. Pissed me off having a tool that didn't work when I needed it so I just tossed them instead of paying for a battery what a corded drill costs. If I needed it for my work I'd pay top dollar for good cordless and just eat the battery replacement cost. Only time I miss the cordless is working where I'm grounded. So I put down a piece of plywood and watch where my hands are. Sometimes I think I'm a cheap ass not having a cordless for such occasions. But it's more protection against getting pissed by a drill that doesn't work.
--Vic
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On Jun 7, 7:38 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Yep, and the alternatives are dicking around with a tangled-up extension cord, and writing everything out on paper.
Buy a decent tool, and you wouldn't have this problem. EXAMPLE: The Ryobi ONE+ lithiums I bought over two years ago are still going like the day they were new. In fact, I'm going to need to replace the drill within the next 6 months because the gearbox is going to hell.
Buy a decent printer, and you wouldn't have this problem. EXAMPLE: I bought an HP 7000 wide carriage inkjet. My last printer cost $75 to replace the ink, and only printed a couple hundred pages. This printer only costs $40 for replacement ink, and will print out the same number of pages. HOWEVER, for another $20 I can get high capacity cartridges which TRIPLE the number of pages I can print between refills.
The only SUCKER out there is you, who feels they have to make a strawman argument out of the worst possible scenarios to justify.... well... I have no f*cking clue what you're trying to justify here...
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I got a new laser printer for about $80. Works great. So glad to be rid of the inkjet.
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Color?
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Just grayscale. I let the kids do the coloring.
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Yeah, I've found color laser printers to still be ridiculously f*cking expensive and the toner cartridges for any laser printer are just as bad as inkjet cartridges.
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Yeah, I've found color laser printers to still be ridiculously f*cking expensive and the toner cartridges for any laser printer are just as bad as inkjet cartridges. ============================================Expensive? Maybe, but laser color printer carts are DRY. I once had an HP printer that would clog completely if not used for a few days. I spent most of the ink cartridge printing the cleaning test. I threw it in the trash and got a color laser from Fry's on sale for under $200. Inkjets are just a way to piss away money. Another advantage of a color laser is the printouts don't smear when wet. I will never buy or recommend an ink-jet to anyone, especially the casual user that prints a few pages in color a month. About the only people who could like inkjets are reformed junkies who like to play with syringes. (-:
-- Bobby G.
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On 6/13/2011 7:16 PM, Robert Green wrote:

I would find one or two sitting by the dumpsters, in perfect condition except for needing ink. When I priced the cartridges, I realized why. Notice how the market for the home 4x6 photo printers has basically collapsed? People realized it was a LOT cheaper to send their pix online to the corner drugstore, which would print them on their commercial-grade printer. I don't print much at home, so I only have a couple BW lasers, both of which came from garage sales. If I ever need color, I'll sneak it at work, or take a thumb drive down to whatever Kinko's is called these days.
I do still have my old 24-pin dot matrix in the back room, though, along with a couple sealed ribbons for it. It makes a fitting museum companion for my old suitcase Kaypro v20 (xt class) machine. Neither is worth any money any more, so I figured as long as I have room, I may as well hold onto them for giggles.
--
aem sends...

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On Mon, 13 Jun 2011 19:16:34 -0400, "Robert Green"
[snip]

[snip]
There are always advantages AND disadvantages. Laser printers (ARAIK) won't print on photo paper.
Still, the laser is best for printing on ordinary paper.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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I think it's been shown here that printing services do a much less expensive job of printing out photos, and for the rare times I actually need photo quality prints, I use them. The color laser is great for printing out web pages that lose a lot of critical information when printed in B&W. I used to use it extensively to print maps out before I got a GPS unit. Most of the times I print stuff out on the HP 6, a real workhorse that's loaded with magnetic ink so I can print my own checks.
-- Bobby G.
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re: "Laser printers (ARAIK) won't print on photo paper."
The laser printers we have at work have settings for Glossy paper and Transparency stock.
We use transparency stock all the time for presentations and I've printed some pretty nice "photos" when using the glossy stock.
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On Mon, 13 Jun 2011 08:52:41 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

A 7000 page toner cartridge for my HP P2015dn is about $35. I don't need color at home. I still have an inkjet printer but ink is expensive and the damned printer was always plugged up when I wanted to use it.
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Why is it a "con"?
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On 6/7/2011 3:35 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Ink is the cheapest component of the print cartridge. The companies obviously do this to make you have to buy new cartridges sooner.
Years ago, I learned from some researchers at Kodak that Kodak made no money off the sale of their cameras and all the profit was in sale of their film. From this thread it is obviously apparent that it is the same for the printer manufacturers.
I'm still smarting after trading in a 5 gallon propane tank for a new filled one (Blue Rhino) to see that it actually contains 15 pounds which is about 3.5 gallons of propane. I think it is a con to sell anything in a partially filled container. Maybe some lawyer reading this out there will consider some class action suits based on these things.
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Nothing you said here makes half-filled ink cartridges in new printers a "con".
Kodak selling cameras (or printers, which they also sell) at cost (or below) is also not a con.
Is every loss-leader that a manufacturer or store sells as means to get you to buy more of their products a "con"?
You bought a printer for $X dollars and you got a printer and some ink to get you started. How were you conned?
Did you buy the printer expecting a certain number of sheets to be printed before you had to buy more ink? On what did you base that expectation other than your own hopes? Did they promise you a certain number of sheets when you bought the printer? I don't recall being promised anything like that when I've bought printers in the past.
If you buy something in a container that can hold 600 gallons of a product and it is clearly labeled as containing 15 gallons, how were you conned? You got exactly what was "promised" on the label, so how were you conned?
Would you feel better if that $99 printer with a half-filled cartridge was $124 with a full cartridge?
You weren't expecting them to absorb that extra cost were you?
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On Tue, 7 Jun 2011 13:59:30 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

If you buy a "gallon" of milk that contains half a gallon were you conned? Nope. You were scammmed. Or taken. Or suckered. Or shorted. Or ripped off. How's that? I don't know if it's true - haven't seen that with HP's - but purposely loading a cartridge meant to hold, say 2 ounces with 1 ounce so the customer has buy a new cartridge sooner is dishonest unless it is specifically noted on the packaging, such as,. "NOTE: CARTRIDGE IN THIS PRINTER CONTAINS HALF THE INK OF A NORMAL CARTRIDGE."
Or maybe,
"NOTE: THIS PRINTER CONTAINS INK CARTRIDGE DESIGNED FOR SUCKERS."

That's bogus. Nowhere near cost of ink. What would make most people feel better is for these companies to produce and make a profit on their printers. And produce and make a profit on their ink. A sharp consumer who doesn't like cartridge cost will get around the ink ripoff by avoiding models cost too much to feed them ink. Maybe the makers will wise up, maybe not. Depends on the consumers. Last printer I bought when my HP died was a little Cannon. Because I didn't like HP cartridge cost and that they made them unrefillable. I print maybe 2 pages a year. I'm a paperless type guy. When the kids did college printing I told them to buy the cartridges themselves. That cut way down on printer use. I doubt I'll buy another printer now that the kids are gone. My wife wanted one of those camera photo printers. Until I explained the cost of ink, and that I could get printing done at many places for a tenth of the cost of just the ink. Anyway, the printer ink cartridge "problem" doesn't affect me. But I understand how it does others who choose to print.
--Vic
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On 6/7/2011 7:26 PM, Vic Smith wrote:

Good answers. You got to him first. I don't mind Kodak making a profit off film or HP off ink. It's the partially filled containers that got me particularly when the cost of the contents was not significant.
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How's *what*?
How can you buy a gallon of milk that contains half a gallon?
Every container of milk (or propane or paint or whatever) that I have ever purchased was clearly marked with the amount of product in the container. A half gallon of anything clearly marked as a half gallon - and priced as a half gallon - is a half gallon.
How was I scammed, taken, suckered, or shorted? You can't be "shorted" if you paid for the amount of product that you received. You can't be scammed, taken or suckered if the amount of product is clearly marked on the package, you read said markings and then decide if the price for that amount is appropriate.

Oh, please. The product was priced for the printer and the amount of ink you get with it. There was no promise of any given amount of ink. Consider yourself lucky that you got any ink at all. Consider your glass half full instead of half empty.

You missed my point. If a replacement ink cartridge costs $50, then they would have every right to charge you $25 more for the printer if the cartridge was full vs. half full. If they are already losing (or not making) money on the printer, why should they eat further into their cash flow by giving you free ink?

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