Cordless Circular saw versus Trim Saw?

I am wondering what is the difference between the cordless 18V Craftsman Trim saw and a similar Circular saw. The two looks almost the same in that they are portable and use a circular blade.
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<< I am wondering what is the difference between the cordless 18V Craftsman Trim saw and a similar Circular saw. >>
Trim saws usually have a smaller diameter blade, like 6 1/2 " vs. 7 1/2 ". They are OK for weekend putter jobs, but battery replacements are very pricey. You may want to check the archives of this NG for opinions on Craftsman tools. A lot of their offerings are top quality, but many are not up to the standards of other well known brands. If you're considering buying an expensive tool you've never used before, get acquainted with your local tool rental store. Try out their tools for weekend projects to get a feel for 1) if you really need it, and 2) how that brand survives in a rental environment. Consumer Reports has occasional tool tests that are useful. HTH
Joe
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Terminology. I think when battery technology was not up to what it is today, say 5 or more years ago, the battery saws were called "Trim Saws". However, today, they can stand up to the AC saw in many cases. I have an 18 volt DeWalt, which uses a 5 1/2" blade. When replacing a patio door with 2 double hung windows, a friend can over to help. He sort-of laughed at my "baby saw". I told him that after we were done with the job, the saw would still be working. We finished the job, including cutting framing studs, etc. and the saw was still going strong. My friend was impressed. I think much of this can be credited to the battery and the blade. The blade is thin and very sharp. Still, you need an AC saw for those big jobs. BTW, I only have one battery. If you were using it every day, 2 batteries would be good.
Joe Bobst wrote:

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On 20 Nov 2003 15:34:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comtosspam (Joe Bobst) wrote:

    This is also my understanding.

    Of all the cordless tools, saws seem to perform the worst. In the extra time it takes to get through a couple of pieces of wood a person could have found the extension cord and plugged a corded saw in. You really need a reason for it to be cordless to justify a cordless saw.
    Corded saws are easier to use and much, much cheaper.
                Peter
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Umm..depends on the brand you buy. We use a Milwaukee, and a Bosch 18V units, and I have to tell you, we use them from everything from framing in with 2X4s to like today...setting register vents in a home that had one layer too many (3) of 3/4 inch flooring laid. While you will not get the run time say, as a drill, you can get exceptional run time from the 2.4amp battery packs like we use.

Depends...really. Packs have come down in recent months, and it just goes to say, if you cant afford to break it, dont use it.

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Good advice till you hit that CR stuff. Consumer Reports, will tell you that DeWalt is top of the line, while the EXACT same, right down to the gears used in the drill, Black and Decker is not worth buying, yet, the only difference is the color of the case....it happens. They do the same thing with AC and heating equipment from time to time....rate one brand name higher than another, yet, both units are identical and made in the same plant...American Standard and Trane being one example, Rheem and Ruud being another, and Coleman and York being yet another. Their reports are, (do a Google search on this and see various takes on this opinion) slightly biased.

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