cordless Circular Saw

Can anyone recommend a cordless circ saw? It needs to cut at least planed 2" timber, so 45mm at least, and cost a lot less than the Bosch etc offerings at a few hundred. Erbauer do a 15cm blade one at about £110 (screwfix), was just wondering if there was anything else you'd recommend more? It probably wont get a great amount of use, so similar performance to a mains cheapie is probably ok in this case. I'm doing less diy these days.
cheers, NT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

I'd wonder just how much you could cut with a cordless type? They're pretty power hungry devices.
--
*I'm not being rude. You're just insignificant

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a Ryobi one+ model, and with 11mm OSB it does 11 x 1200mm cuts before losing power.
This has a 150mm blade, and it will cut 45mm regularised, but not 50mm rough sawn
dg
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dg wrote:

Thats the one I was looking at, just barely big enough. 44 foot of cut on a chanrge should do the trick, so I might go for that. Thanks. Would be nice to have something better specified re depth & power, but I'm not going to spend a few ton to do it.
NT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Is this Ryobi One much quieter than yer average mains circ? I'll probably get one, just wanted to get a bit more idea about it first.
Thanks for the input so far
NT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have the B&Q Power Pro OEM version which was based on the previous Ryobi 18V cordless circular saw. It's pretty good and can cut three or four 2400mm cuts in 18mm WBP before it needs a charge/battery replacement. I have used it to cut 50mm+ rough sawn, the trick being to cut about halfway through on one side then turn over and cut through on the other side. use the rip fence for accuracy and you get an extremely clean cut.
I wondered about getting a much larger circular saw, mains powered. What put me off was having to deal with a cord while cutting and I don't do enough jobs to make it worthwhile.
What I do appreciate with the PP circular saw is that it cuts extremely well and doesn't tend to wander off the cut. It's very easy to cut an exact straight line while hand-holding the saw.
Sadly B&Q seem to have dropped the range, they cost about 1/2 to 1/3rd of the price of the Ryobi version and it was difficult to tell the difference between the two (other than the case colour and logo). The Ryobi "One" system seems to offer a better range of tools and the prices are reasonable.
If you do see one of the B&Q Power toolsets on sale (Circular Saw, Reciprocating Saw, Drill, Torch all using the same 18V battery) I'd grab it. The only beef I have is with the quality of the batteries. After several years I think mine are ready to be re-celled since they don't hold a charge as long as they used to.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Batteries are the problem with all cheap tools. If you do re-cell with decent ones you'll likely find the tool performs better than new - as well as running for longer.
--
*When cheese gets it's picture taken, what does it say?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have a mix of batteries, three slow charge which were supplied with the set of tools and three rapid charge (one hour) supplied with the jigsaw that I bought separately, the batteries are almost identical except that the rapid charge ones use a thermal sensor to stop charging when they get too hot. The slow charge ones don't have the sensor hence cannot be used in the rapid charger. I'd love to get hold of three sensors but I've not been able to source them. I think it may be a troll around RS or Maplin to see if I can identify the component.
As you say, no-name tagged cells and I suspect that I could source better from the "pound shop".
On the positive side the battery boxes are well made and easy to open by removing a handful of screws.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Firth wrote:

I can't think of anything more frustrating than a cordless circular saw.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 7, 7:54 pm, % snipped-for-privacy@malloc.co.uk (Steve Firth) wrote:

If the saw disc isn't sharp it'll zap the batteries too as it works a lot harder.
The only issue I have with mine is the base plate is only secured one end so if you press too hard the cut goes of vertical.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 1 Feb 2008 08:09:24 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

No. All the ones I have tried left so much to be desired that I used a hand saw.
(Mostly sheer lack of power)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave wrote:

pretty power hungry devices.
EricP wrote:

Bgger. It figures though.
NT
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 1, 4:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

This any good?
<http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/SIP-01388-24V-CORDLESS-MITRE-SAW-WITH-LASER - LINE_W0QQitemZ130193676722QQihZ003QQcategoryZ106000QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem>
cheers, Pete.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

I bought an SIP badged jobby with 2 x 18v 2 ah batteries last year. You can have it if you collect. Useless except on thin ply etc.
Even with 2 batteries it struggles, charger won't charge them as fast as you use them up.
Went back to a mains 165mm Makita, very small & light, 54mm depth of cut
I expect to get a good one you would have tp spend around £400.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Will give you all a report on the 36V Dewalt later in the week when it arrives.
Steve
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Feb 2, 12:57 pm, "The Medway Handyman"

I have a PPro one I think, and I bought it to rough cut a kitchen worktop so it would fit in the car. I'd say it'd do maybe two or three cuts through something so thick before losing power but use it on lighter things and it lasts longer. They're no where near as powerful as mains one but I find mains ones to be a bit scary :-) Mine has a fine-ish toothed disc so it makes fairly neat cuts and I'd say it's one of the best tool buys I've ever made. It seems like a well made B&Q product rather than some of their poor quality stuff.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.