"captive" T-blade adapter

I'm looking for a T-blade adapter that I can "make captive" (either permanently or on a tether).
This *might* do the job -- but I can't see the "other side" to be sure: <
http://assets.peavey.com/images/large/118485_25910.jpg
Another option: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> albeit not quite as easy to "captivate"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Jan 2016 10:28:37 -0700, Don Y

Why? NEMA is trying to prevent you from, plugging 20a equipment into 15a circuits and you are defeating theat protection. If it is really a 20a circuit, why not just install a 20a receptacle?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/25/2016 11:38 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Who said it was "20A equipment"?
I have a 100ft spool of 12/3 and another of 10/3. Both are capable of supporting 20A loads. Both have 20A *plugs*. Does this mean I can never use the *wire* to support a 15A device on a 15A outlet? Should I have to remove the 20A plug and replace it with a 15A plug when using it in such a situation? Or, replace the 15A *outlet* (which might only be on a 15A branch circuit) with a 20A outlet for that duration?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Jan 2016 11:49:35 -0700, Don Y

Poor choice of plug in the first place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/25/2016 1:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

So, I should put a 15A plug on a cord that will be sized for 20A loads? Poor choice of *cord*?
Silly boy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Jan 2016 13:32:51 -0700, Don Y

Do whatever you want to do. You can cut the plug off and shove the wires in the receptacle if you want.
out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/25/2016 1:44 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

(sigh) Response from someone clearly incapable of rational thought. Go throw your temper tantrum in the corner -- "TIME out".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 2:56:49 PM UTC-6, Don Y wrote:

It's clear *you* are the one over-reacting...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2016-01-25 4:04 PM, bob_villain wrote:

The breaker/fuse is sized to the wiring/plugs, not what is plugged into it, simple and end of story.
--
Froz...

Quando omni flunkus, moritati
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/25/2016 2:14 PM, FrozenNorth wrote:

No. Run a 16AWG extension cord -- better yet, daisy chain 5 or 6 of them together -- then throw a 15A resistive load on the end and see what happens. (hint: 15A breaker won't trip) Do the same with an inductive/reactive load.
Connectors are sized to the expected loads because wires are not "ideal" conductors. They have losses (which can be complex if coiled, etc.).
The XMAS lights we use can be daisy-chained -- logical as it makes stringing them much easier; the earlier string(s) act as extension cords for the later strings. But, the wiring is flimsy: why size it for 15A when the current string doesn't use more than an amp or two and its unlikely that there will be 6 or 7 strings fed, in series, off of that one!? OTOH, you *know* Joe Average will mindlessly keep plugging strings into each until they've reached whatever length they need (total number of lights). So, you put a fuse *in* each string to ensure the fuse blows before the wire "overheats".
You don't want someone to "see" a connector at the load end of a cord that *suggests* they can connect a 20A device there (esp if the other end of the cord is 100 ft distant). Likewise, you don't want to limit where a (extension) cord can be used by fixing the connectors on each end: - one cord with 20A plug and 20A (or 15A) receptacle - another identical cord with 15A plug and 15A receptacle especially when the cord -- and the reel through which it is supplied power (think: commutating brushes/rings) -- is costly.
Instead, you (I) want to be able to do double-duty with the cord while ensuring that anyone using it is aware of the limitations of the circuit to which it may be connected. Having a *captive* adapter forces the person using the cord to think about what they are plugging it into and the consequences of that choice (adapter on vs. adapter off).
There's a *reason* manufacturers make such adapters! Trick is finding one that is easily "made captive".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's perfectly acceptable to use a larger gauge of conductor, than the baseline for a given ampacity. In fact, the code tables for ampacity vs. gauge note that for longer runs, you must increase the gauge to avoid voltage drop due to resistive loading of the conductor.
NEMA 5-20R are specifically designed to allow a NEMA 5-15P, so using 5-15P on your extention cord not only conforms to the NEC recommendations, but is a logical move as well if have a desire to use the same cord with a NEMA 5-15R.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, that's perfectly fine, to-code and makes a lot of sense, unless you've used a L-series receptacle. Note that NEMA 5-20R will accept either a NEMA 5-15p or a 5-20p.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

YOur spools of wire are not rated for what you think they are. While the wire will carry the current, there is enough voltage drop that you should not be using them at 20 amps.
100 feet of # 12 should be used for up to 12 amps and 100 feet of # 10 should be used up to 15 amps from a wire chart I looked at.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

GF the argument ensues....
--
Tekkie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, January 25, 2016 at 11:28:35 AM UTC-6, Don Y wrote:

8SCE>

For a guy that has an answer for everything...you ask some dumb questions! (ಠ‿ʘ)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.