Bosch Axxess washer 230 volt supply plug

We have purchased this Washer and need to know what connections are needed to the outlet. I have a dryer 230 outlet near and it is connected with a Red, White, Black and Ground connection. I plan to pony this outlet connection on the dryer connections. I have been told that a 12/2 cable with ground is all that is required. I connection to the Red terminal and 1 connection to the Black terminal and ground connection to the ground. Any help would be appreciated.
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hamish wrote:

Look at the outlet on the wall and go buy a matching dryer cord from a hardware store. There should be a wiring diagram on the back of the dryer and/or instruction sheet with the dryer.
Note do not use 12/2 that is too small and does not have the red wire. The dryer cord will be the correct size (10 gauge). Kevin
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He's trying to ADD a 230V outlet for a WASHER. Running the black, red and ground to the new outlet is correct, assuming the washer only needs 230V, not 115V. However 12 gauge wire is NOT OK. The wire size must be compatible with the breaker. Assuming the existing wire is of the correct gauge, then the run from the existing outlet to the new one should be the same gauge. If you use 12 gauge and someone later were to plug in a larger load, fire could result.
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On Mar 22, 11:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Agree the wire size must match the breaker. Assuming this is in North America with the typical 115/0/115 (230 volts between the two 115 volt legs) and that the Bosch washer does indeed need 230 volts (as do European models) the red and black connection sounds correct and the white neutral shouldn't be required. Proper grounding should be emphasized. However the OP does not appear to know enough and there may indeed be some doubt about the Bosch washer voltage specification, for doing the job correctly and safely. Would recommend a completely separate circuit to it's own circuit breaker. Not something 'tapped on' to an existing circuit! Also just "being told that 12-2 is needed" is not good necessarily good info. One has visions of some 12-2 tacked onto an existing dryer outlet (correctly or incorrectly?). Then later with the dryer running the washer jams or something and the breaker starts tripping ................. Then again it may get hooked up and work that way for years, not conforming with electrical safety code and 15 years fom now there is an unfortunate 'incident' and an insurance company investigation finds 'Non conforming wiring' and declines to compensate. Get proper advice!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

If using the same circuit (which should be fine) the breaker needs to be appropriate for the washer. That probably means changing it to 20A (still 2-pole 220V). Check the washer installation instructions.
I suggest changing the dryer outlet to one that matches the washer.
--
bud--

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Why is that? You can plug a 15Watt nightlight into a 20 amp outlet. And if he lowers the breaker to the min for the washer, the dryer is gonna trip it. He does need to be sure the existing breaker and wire can handle the loads of both the dryer and the washer.
>That probably means changing it to 20A

But sounds like the washer is 230v, with two hots, one ground. Suppose the dryier is 4 wire, with 2 hots,neutral and ground? Why change the dryer outlet at all?

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

A nightlight is designed to be connected to a 20A circuit.
The washer is designed to be connected to a circuit of some max amperage. It should be in the literature supplied by the manufacturer. The manufacturer might allow the washer to be connected to a 30A circuit, but I doubt it. A cord that matches the 30A breaker does not solve the problem if the washer is not designed to operate on 30A circuit. In addition it is a code violation to have a breaker larger than the manufacturer's instructions.
The OP said nothing about an electric dryer being used. I assume he is not using one. If he is, you are right that he can't reduce the breaker. To state what probably everyone knows, the washer and an electric dryer can't be used at the same time (on the same 30A circuit).

I am assuming there is no dryer. If there is and the washer is not rated for a 30A circuit there should be overcurrent protection appropriate for the washer between the dryer circuit and an outlet for the washer.
It is not stated, but I suspect the washer comes with a cord/plug installed. If it does, changing to a 30A cord may not be real easy.
If you need to change the washer cord or the outlet, replacing the outlet (and breaker) is more appropriate.
To resolve the questions the OP would have to answer: manufacturers max circuit rating is an electric dryer being used does the washer come with an attached cord
--
bud--

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He said he wanted to run the washer off the dryer outlet. That would sure seem to me to imply that he has an electric dryer. Gas dryers are generally 120V, as are washers. Given that the dryer is 230V, it sure sounds to me like it's an electric.
I think the right answer here is he should just run another dedicated line for the washer.

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

He said he has a dryer OUTLET, not that he has an electric dryer. Homes are often built with both gas and electric provisions for the dryer (the builder doesn't know which the ultimate homeowner wants).
In my home, I have a gas dryer and an unused 220V outlet right next to it.
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Interesting. Around here (NJ) in every case I've seen, builders give you one or the other. Which kind of makes sense, as it's extra cost to them to run both gas and electric for a dryer.
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On Mar 22, 2:15 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

First to clarify the situation, and thanks for all the advise given, we have a new dryer and washer and have a 230 dryer socket which was in use with the previous dryer. The new washer is plugged with a special plug which is 250 volts 15 amps. the washer draws 12 amps at maximum. In looking into the situation more fully, and removing the dryer electric socket and box I can add a connection to the socket up to a new two pole 230 volt fused switch (15 amp) ncr and then feed a new outlet with the socket for the special plug on the washer. Cable will be 12/2 with ground. At 12 amps load and overload and short circuit interruption capacity at 15 amps ncr I think this should protect the washer, and the dryer. The dryer is protected by 40 amp breaker. Any comments, thanks for your interest and suggestions
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wrote:

First to clarify the situation, and thanks for all the advise given, we have a new dryer and washer and have a 230 dryer socket which was in use with the previous dryer. The new washer is plugged with a special plug which is 250 volts 15 amps. the washer draws 12 amps at maximum. In looking into the situation more fully, and removing the dryer electric socket and box I can add a connection to the socket up to a new two pole 230 volt fused switch (15 amp) ncr and then feed a new outlet with the socket for the special plug on the washer. Cable will be 12/2 with ground. At 12 amps load and overload and short circuit interruption capacity at 15 amps ncr I think this should protect the washer, and the dryer. The dryer is protected by 40 amp breaker. Any comments, thanks for your interest and suggestions
*I can't say what is there now, but in many cases the existing 120 volt laundry receptacle is a dedicated 20 amp circuit. It could easily be converted to a 220 volt circuit by changing the receptacle and adding a two pole circuit breaker at the source.
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hamish wrote:

It would work but you probably can't run the washer and dryer at the same time.
The wire from the dryer outlet to the disconnect should be rated 40A.
Dryer circuits I have seen are 30A. If the dryer outlet is 30A the breaker should be 30A. If the breaker is 40A you might want to check that the wire is #8.
If this is going to be inspected I suggest you run what you want to do past the inspector.
=============With both a washer and electric dryer I like John's idea. (I would only add you should tape the white wire black at each end.).
If this is going to be inspected you should also run this past the inspector. The NEC has required a 20A laundry circuit for a long time. I don't see a requirement that it be 120V, and IMHO this meets the intent of the code. (The breaker may have to be 15A depending on the receptacle required and the manufacturer's instructions.)
--
bud--

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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Heh! It's extra cost for them to provide a roof, too.
The gas is already there - the water heater sits next to the dryer. So, we're talking about the incremental cost for, oh, thirty feet of wire and an outlet.
I have the same arrangement for the range. My range is gas, but there's a 220V outlet next to the gas valve. For this, the cost to the builder is greater since the range is another ten feet from the breaker box.
So, then, in my case, to add electric capability to a gas-powered house, the builder had to pony up thirty 1968 bucks for 70' of wire, two breakers, and two outlets. That leaves the cost of the installer's time.
Here in Texas (a RTW state), finding a Mexican whose hand fits a screwdriver has never been difficult. In New Jersey, having a union electrician install two outlets may be a significant expense.
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