220 volt to 110 volt

Page 1 of 3  
I have a 220 volt line that powers my pool pump. I want to run 110 volt lights near the pool pump and would like to convert 220 to 110. Is this as simple as taking the 220 wires, and connecting only one hot wire side with the common wire and ground wire to a standard 110 volt outlet?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am not an electrician, but....
I believe that is how they do it on 220V electric ranges.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then perhaps you should consider not answering electrical questions...

.. especially when you don't know the answers.
To the OP: ignore Tater.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 20, 5:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

now that i think further about it, if he has a three wire 240v line going in, he shouldn't do it.
now if he has a four wire (red, black, white, bare) line, then he can.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. Stoves and dryers are the only special case where you could do this. It's been against US code for a couple of years now, so you can't do new installations that way anymore.
[It's been against Canadian code for at least 30 years.]
I wouldn't dream of doing it with a pool pump outdoors. You're compromising the ground. That plus water that you immerse yourself in doesn't mix.
If you lost a ground connection (many ground connections really aren't that good - I've seen too many people just wrap them without wire nuts - or worse, assume that simply lying against the electrical box sides was sufficient), the pump frame, the fixture, and everything else bonded to them in the area could go hot. And you're just asking for corrosion - which'll kill the ground eventually if it's carrying any current.
Bad. Really really bad.
This is one of those "it'd probably work for a while" _will_ eventually bite you.

Either he has four wire, or he converts the pump to 120V. Either way is reasonable. Might not be able to convert the pump to 120V, or the circuit may not be beefy enough for it. Strictly speaking, probably both approaches are still against code (code doesn't like sharing motors (except very small ones) with anything else on a circuit). But an inspector would probably let you get away with it for a light bulb or two on a "change" (rather than new install).
A 240V bulb is by far the simplest/cheapest solution.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

.. which is exactly what I said a day and a half ago.
Is there an echo in here?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, it's that simple. No, it's not legal or proper.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They make 220 v lightbulbs you know.
Living temporarily in Europe where it's all 220V, 50 Hz, we use our same lamps and just buy the 220V bulbs. Works fine.
Sure you can buy transformers but for lights there's no point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, it's not.
Go sit in the corner with Tater.]

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just for future reference, it's 240 and 120 -- hasn't been 220 and 110 for a long, long time.

No. You probably need to pull a new cable. A 240V circuit consists of two hot conductors and a ground -- and NO neutral conductor. A 120V circuit consists of one hot, one neutral, and one ground.
In other words, to get a 120V circuit, you need a neutral, and you probably don't have one. It's possible, although unlikely, that your pool pump circuit contains an extra conductor -- check the cable going to the pump, and count the wires in it. If there are four of them (black, red, white, and bare), then you can do this easily and safely: black and red to the pump, black and white (or red and white, doesn't matter) to the 120V outlet, and bare to everywhere that needs a ground. Verify at the breaker box that black and red go to a double-pole breaker and white to the neutral bus bar.
If you only have three wires in the cable going to the pool pump (black, white, and bare), then you don't have a neutral, and you need pull a new cable that does have one. Rather than remove the existing 3-wire 240V circuit and replace it with a 4-wire 240V/120V circuit, it's much less trouble to simply install a new 120V circuit.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

--
The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
minimize spam. Our true address is of the form snipped-for-privacy@prodigy.net.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

safely install a 120V *outlet* without having a neutral conductor present, which he probably does not have.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is a major difference between making something work, and making it work safely. Equipment grounding conductors are NEVER used to conduct anything but fault currents. You'd create an electrical hazard by using a ground instead of a neutral for your 120 volt circuit

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The question is the neutral. Does the wiring out to the pool pump provide a neutral? If not, you really should not do this.
If there is a neutral, you can take a 110 volt socket off the circuit for low wattage appliances. It is not acceptable to use the ground as a neutral.
--

Christopher A. Young;
.
.

"Tool" < snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Nov 2007 08:20:28 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Finally, a correct and useful answer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Since the code requires an insulated 12ga copper ground wire to a pool pump it will usually be wire in conduit. Adding a neutral should not be that hard. For that matter pulling in 2 wires for a totally separate circuit is not that hard either. Just be sure you put the GFCI on the load end of that conduit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No: You cannot safely use the ground as one side of an electrical circuit! Especially in the vicinity of a pool electrical safety is extremely important. Also non standard wiring might invalidate any liability insurance, if discovered, even if an an accident did not occur.
The use of ground as one side of a circuit, even an electrical cooking stove, is not standard or approved in any jurisdictions that anyone with an electrical background is aware.
The ground wire is there to safely connect items to ground and prevent electrical shock and/death 'in the event of a fault condition'. Under normal no-fault conditions the ground wire does not carry any electrical current.
Suggest you get someone competent and probably licensed, to reduce you r liability for something dangerous. Also suggest that the circuit you are proposing be equipped through a GFI, either an outlet or GFI type circuit breaker. This may be mandated by regulation anyway in your jurisdiction.
Respectfully suggest that anyone asking that question in that manner does not have the knowledge to safely do such work. Yes; it might work, the lights may come on an everything 'appear' to be OK until something happens! With any electricty in or near a pool make sure someone present knows CPR.
Also depending on regulations in your jurisdiction it likely may not be legal to connect pumps and lights to the same fuse/circuit breaker. many of these items may seem onerous but they make sense and in some ways are to protect us from ourselves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Suggestion: If all you need is a convenience light 'near' the pool it may be possible to use a transformer. The transformer would convert/ step down the 220 to 110 volts to feed a conventional lamp. A transformer for say 100 watts would not be too expensive or large. The metal frame of such a transformer and the box it is mounted in should be grounded for safety. The output of the transformer could have switch to control the light. But again everything should be wired/ mounted in standard way to conform with approved electrical safety and insurance practices.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.