Should I believe the AC repair man?

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Unfortunately, it sounds like this guy is telling you the truth. The new 13 SEER (seasonal energy effiency ratings) standards that went into effect at the beggining of 06' have put several other homeowners as well as large apartment complexes and municipalities in the same situation. Older systems do not have a TXV or thermostatic expansion vavle which will keep them from operating properly with newer equipment. In this case, the best advise would probably be to avoid the local jack-leg "tech" who may offer to only change out one of the units to save you money. Big Daddy wrote:

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Well, now. Supposing the fellow replaced the evaporator. The old one didn't have a TXV, and the new one would. What's the problem?
The only problem I can see if the compressor is low starting torque, and requires the orifice to rapidly equalize the system pressures.
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Christopher A. Young
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There is a lot more to it than that.
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A post without information is like a teaspoon of sugar. It sweetens that which it touches, and provides quick energy. But lacking in substance, it is not to be sought out.
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Christopher A. Young
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Its not worth the trouble to explain it to you because you just don't have a clue. How many evap coils did you replace last week?? last month?? last year?? Did that evap coil have a piston or a TXV??
Never mind.... you still don't understand how to correctly balance the refrigerant charge in a system, nor the physics or thermodynamics behind it.

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wrote:

    You gotta be kidding.
    Ask him 'how many has he ever so much as SEEN with the service panel off ?', you MIGHT get an answer. In the single digits at best.

    Hell, if it ain't R-22, he doesn't know what refrigerant goes IN the damned thing.

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<sigh> Your right....If ignorance is bliss, then he's euphoric.
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Big Daddy wrote:

Definately a gas leak. Look for signs of oil, they are a strong indicator for a leak.
This spring, when we had the freon filled, we asked

Dye was a good option.

Not true. Not easy but not true. Apply additive as recommended by snipped-for-privacy@gonefishin.net to seal leaks if the losses are small would be lowest cost solution.
I asked if we could replace the coils and he said he can't buy

Find another tech.

Find another tech.

He had to get one right eventually.

He needs to boost his christmas fund.

Absolutely!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
The size depends on the load applied. A heat load will determine the needs. As for cost, it depends on unit capacity.
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On 16 Jul 2006 21:53:29 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@pj.com wrote:

Too bad this wasnt it... Units under fifty pounds can be re-charged till the cows come home.
The May 14, 1993 regulations establish leak repair requirements to further minimize emissions of class I and class II substances.
The rule states that appliances that normally hold a refrigerant charge of fifty pounds or more are subject to the leak repair requirements.
An annual leak rate of 35 percent was established for industrial process sources and commercial chillers, while an annual leak rate of 15 percent was established for comfort-cooling. Where the leak rate is exceeded, the appliance must be repaired within 30 days. An alternative is to develop a retrofit or replacement plan within 30 days, outlining action to retrofit or replace the appliance within one year from the exceedance.
[Federal Register: August 8, 1995 (Volume 60, Number 152)] [Rules and Regulations] [Page 40419-40444] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
Now back to the bozo bin for you.
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