Radishes. . .

Radishes are supposed to be so easy and quick to grow that Fourth Grade students use them as science projects.
But in that field, I flunk. For years I've planted radish seeds -- in every place, in every kind of soil, deep and shallow, but no matter what, they always come up, form a spindly stem, and that's it. I never get a root.
What's the problem?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hopefully, it is hard soil. This year I have very soft soil and I'm hoping for a better crop of radishes. Shouldn't be long before I find out. The other possibility is too much nitrogen which favors vegetaive growth instead of root growth. Try steamed bone meal (1-13-0), and some greensand or wood ashes, to stimulate root growth.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lack of sunlight will do this.
EJ in NJ
Billy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My problem is definitely not hard soil, nor is it lack of sun. It has to be something else. Maybe the excess nitrogen, but I've tried planting in many different locations. The result is always the same -- leaves, stems, and no roots.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here in NY I've found radishes do best planted in very early spring, during cool/cold wet weather... sown once it warms up it's mostly the leaves that grow, the radishes become woody, very small, insect infested, and overly sharp tasting, once planted past the peak time it's hardly worth the trouble. I don't plant radishes every year but weather permitting I will sow a packet in my herb garden by my back door where I can see them from my window. I pick them early before they become too large and are pithy. I don't ordinarilly buy ordinary radishes, I usually buy those giant diakons, they're mild and crisp, very nice in a salad or even a light soup... diakon is good in ramen along with bock choy, napa, garlic, 'shooms, etc. Too bad diakon isn't available bright red skinned, least I've never seen any. I've tried growing diakon but no luck... I think "No Luck" is the name of a Chinese market.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Radishes have been my worst crop and I am trying it again. The soil is tilled and the radishes have been up for two weeks. It has been raining everyday for the past 8 days and the soil is saturated. The radishes I harvested last year were small and bitter, probably from being in the ground too long or maybe not enough sand. No signs of insect damage. They are not spindly at all, as they are getting plenty of full sun.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you want to plant a good radish that is not hot or woody, try the German Parat radish. I've had very good luck with them and they taste good and grow very well to a large to medium size. I got mine from Gurney. I think Burpee has them too.
__________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature database 4055 (20090506) __________
The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.
http://www.eset.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.