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wrote:

Don't forget the Rio Grand -- "too thick to drink; to thin to plow". Actually, the Sandias are to the east and the river to the west. Except the city has crept up the foothills and over the river.
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One other thing. New Mexico has lots of hummingbirds :)
I know moving is a difficult thing and the older you get the harder it gets to move, but if you look at it as an adventure and keep your sense of humor it could be fun. Albuquerque has several reservations around the area as well as at least 1 air base, and a very nice historical district.
Shell

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Madgardener said:

and climate information):
http://list.realestate.yahoo.com/re/neighborhood/search.html?csz=Albuquerque%2CNM
Housing prices look like an incredible bargain compared to where I live...
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Pat in Plymouth MI

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On Tue, 14 Oct 2003 06:03:50 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@someplace.net.net (Pat Kiewicz) wrote:

"Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets, but humbler folk may circumvent this restriction if they know how. To plant a pine, for example, one need be neither god nor poet; one need only own a good shovel. By virtue of this curious loophole in the rules, any clodhopper may say: Let there be a tree--and there will be one"
Aldo Leopold
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On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 18:51:11 -0400, "Madgardener"

Don't live in, but grew up in Albuq. Would love to go back. You might try the Albuq. Tribune web site (http://www.abqtrib.com /) for a snapshot of local life. The last time I looked at employment opportunities there, the wages offered indicated a low cost of living (or teachers would be starving in the streets!)
The climate is high desert (5,000 ft) with minimal rain and very little humidity. Add Albuq. to your Wonderground.com 'favorites' and check the weather. While it's hot in summer, temperatures cool 30 degrees at night, which makes it more than bearable. Plus, no humidity means that perspiration does the job it's designed for and shade *means* something. It snows occasionally in winter. The mountains are gorgeous. The sky is bluer there than anywhere. Great Mexican food, as you can imagine, but Albuq. is a big city, not a rustic backwater. According to their site (www.unm.edu), the University of New Mexico entertains close to 25,000 students. There's a lot of Hispanic/Indian influence on architecture, language, and culture. Gardening will be *very* different. I remember the main gardening chore being *watering*. Everything that isn't sprinkled or irrigated dries up and blows away. (See the film 'The Milagro Beanfield War', which is set somewhat to the north, and shows a *lot* of that blue sky!)
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Madgardener wrote:

Hi Mad - I'm in an area similar to yours (Central VA, zone 7). My brother and cousin have both moved to Albuquerque recently, one for school and the other for career reasons. They both liked it, were able to find real estate cheaper than around here (but where isn't it cheaper than Albemarle County!!!!), but they did find the landscape hard to get used to. As you know, we have the Blue Ridge mountains and abundant greenery, and it's a little dry and shrubby for their liking. But the culture is great, the artists' communities are great, the skiing is phenomenal, my cousin's kids love it, etc, etc etc. You will find it quite different from Tennessee, though, so if you can't imagine living anywhere else....
On the other hand, it would be another reason for me to get my *ss in gear and get down to Albuquerque for a visit. <g>
Callen in VA
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awww honey. You're too sweet! So you live in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountain area. I love that section of the country too. Went thru it when going up to DC to pick up Squire one year a few times and the drive thru the "Ridge" was breath taking. The valleys that lay between those ridges was inspiring to me........this is one of the hardest things I've had to decide since having to come to terms with moving HERE believe it or not. Everyone is supportative of whatever I decide. There are huge obstacles in the way, of which selling this house is one......we're having serious problems with the IRS again and I'm almost on the edge of sheer panic attacks regarding THAT, and just leaving a place where I've more than put roots down is hard. I finally got both my son's in the same area.........something that some would question. I am a very family type person and when my youngest was in Louisiana for those 7 years, and unable to visit like he wanted to and we were denied visits by his wife to see our grand daughters, it was hard on me then. I finally got him up here when he settled his marriage problems and divorced. He's now back in Tennessee, we moved the oldest son back from Iowa, and despite that he's currently living with us temporarily until he gets on his feet, just having both my son's closer is a comfort to me.
Not to mention that I've settled here comfortably despite that I "garden on a steep slope" and may never clear the woods adequately.
On the UP side. I have in pots all over the place and have had for years, cactus and succulents that I've always adored. I have one Cereus cactus that resides in a pot that it and the pot weigh close to 200 pounds. It would finally be "home" were we to relocate, as the other prickly babies I have would love as well. Leaving the massive amounts of plants would be hard, but hardest of all would be having to leave the plants that I am endeared to. The dragon lilies. (The blue Enigma might make it there, not sure) The Frakartii asters I adore and love. The various assorted shrubs that bloom for me, and my hellebores. If I were to make a list of things I just COULDN'T leave behind it would have about 25 or 40 plants on the list, within reason. But if Squire did apply for the job and got it, it would be a no brainer.
Another pull at my heart is WNCW that I listen to 24-7. But it's online so that wouldn't be a problem <g> my music is as much a part of me as my blood and mind.
I guess with this huge windfall blowing in, the crap with the IRS lately and this morning, the possibility of the mortgage lender embezzling the $13,000 that was supposed to go to the IRS for the Offer in Compromise........well that's enough for now. I have a huge plateful of problems that need resolving. Thanks for your kindness and comforting words. I will keep you abreast of the situation as it resolves itself. madgardener up on the ridge, back in fairy holler, where the fall rains have moved in and the air smells like damp leaves overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7, Sunset zone 36

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Madgardener wrote:

Since you know all about the four-year drought that finally broke in the Mid-Atlantic region, I'll tell you a little story.
We had a friend who moved from Central Va. to Sante Fe last year. Not far from Albuquerque, not sure of the distance. She moved from one bad drought to an even worse one, according to her. Water restrictions and all.
Since you are the 'Madgardener', you might want to really consider that part of the equation.
Whatever you decide, I wish you the best.
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I have 13 cousins living there. Went there for conference and met them then came back with my mother and DH to visit the cousins ... in July. Yes, it was hot. BUT.... they got enough water unlike Santa Fe. I dont think I have ever seen a more beautiful campus than the U of NM. The buildings and the landscaping. Since they do have winter, I think almost anything you have could grow there. The key is having water features in adobe walled gardens. Ups the humidity. But I would want to live up in the Sandias if I had a choice. Consider that it might not be forever either. I dont think I could move from Milwaukee area. Mostly cause most of my family and friends are here. I know you are considering Squire's feelings, but consider how happy he is going to be if you are really miserable. So make a deal for two years and if you cant take it, then maybe move back to the woodlands. Ingrid
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On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 18:51:11 -0400, "Madgardener"

It's a great place. Clean, nice weather, cool winters (apples and tulips), summer monsoons. Ethnically diverse. Beautiful.
Buy the Sunset Western Garden Book and find out what the zones are, because you may read the zone descriptions and decide you want to live in a particular situation. Forget the USDA zones, because they're worthless. I don't know how anyone can use them, to be honest.
Mary, Zones 11 and 13
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> Forget the USDA zones, because they're

Folks use them because plants are not sold with Sunset hardiness zone indicators and the zone information provided in the Sunset books is woefully incorrect.
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On Sat, 08 Nov 2003 16:08:11 GMT, "Pam - gardengal"

Really? I've never had a problem with the zone information. They're a little conservative, I know, but some of that is the microclimate problem. And plants aren't sold with USDA zone indicators either.
Minimum temperature is just not enough information. Even AHS says so implicitly, with their additional zone system. If you use minimum temperature, Palm Desert and, let's see, San Francisco, maybe, are in the same zone, 30 degF. I don't think so.
Mary
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