New dryer trips breaker as soon as plugged in

I have a new GE dryer and it trips the circuit breaker as soon as it is plugged in. The power cord and connections appear okay and tight. The breaker is on a 40amp circuit. I'm too far from a city to get service so hoping to DIY the repair. So much for GE!
------------------------------------- Thanks!
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?"dc29" wrote in message
I have a new GE dryer and it trips the circuit breaker as soon as it is plugged in. The power cord and connections appear okay and tight. The breaker is on a 40amp circuit. I'm too far from a city to get service so hoping to DIY the repair. So much for GE!
Is it set to the correct voltage if dual voltage type
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Londonman wrote:

Also-
Is it an earth leakage breaker? If so, are *all* the connections the right way round? No N-E crossover, for instance.
Other than that, check the resistances from L-N, L-E and N-E with the dryer turned off. L-E should be open circuit, L-N may be open, high or low, depending on what's connected internally across the input, and N-E should be open circuit. Also, check the socket is correctly wired. It wouldn't be the first time I've found that a socket I've not used before was wired back to front and sideways.
--
Tciao for Now!

John.

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If it is a new dryer it will be under warranty
For a non technical approach
Try it in other sockets in the property where similar appliances (eg washer) work
If it trips the breaker there the fault is most likely with the appliance call the supplier and have it collected for replacement
If it does not trip in other locations investigate the socket
Regards
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I'm sorry but you have been conned into thinking that Flashnewsgroups is some kind of web based help forum when in fact it is a third rate rip off of an internet structure known as Usenet.
See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usenet
Your request for help has been dumped on the respondents of the UK based usenet group free.uk.d-i-y which is for people seeking help with DIY project problems in the UK.
Respondents here are unlikely to be able to help you with your problem..
Feel free to complain to Flashnewsgroups about the way you have been misled.
--
fred
FIVE TV's superbright logo - not the DOG's, it's bollocks
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Sorry but you have been misled into thinking you have a clue.
See https://www.flashnewsgroups.com/fng_index.php
MBQ
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In article

Noted.
--
fred
FIVE TV's superbright logo - not the DOG's, it's bollocks
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On Feb 11, 5:08am, dcampeau29_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (dc29) wrote:

2 possibilities a) the dryer's faulty b) the socket is miswired, either behind the socket or at the CU
Plug it in elsewhere, in a known good socket then you'll know which it is
NT
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On 11/02/2011 05:08, dc29 wrote:

Judging by your wording, I am assuming you are not in the UK... If that is the case then the advice we can give will only be rather general in nature.
When you say the breaker trips, is this a normal breaker, or does it also include a Ground Fault (circuit) Interrupter (what we would call a Residual Current Device or RCD)?
I don't know what type of response curve your breaker has - but chances are if its genuinely being tripped on over-current rather than earth leakage, then you must have a dead short in the cable or the machine. A similar breaker in the UK would need a fault current of about 200A to open instantly as you are describing. Hence a few resistance measurements with a basic multimeter ought to identify where the problem is.
--
Cheers,

John.

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dcampeau29_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com says...

This doesn't sound like a UK setup. I don't want to be nasty, but you may find more appropriate answers in a group that's specific to your country.
If it is UK then I apologise!
--
Skipweasel - never knowingly understood.

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