Mandevilla

I was at the Home Despot and picked up a Sun Parasol Mandevilla. It was big and $10.
Since I'm in Atlanta, 7b, and freezing temps are not uncommon, I'm going to either bring it in or enjoy it for the season.
How far can you cut these back, and how much light will it need to overwinter?
I suppose I need to build a trellis now. I wonder if I've just given myself a problem I don't need!
Somehow, I got rid of all my honeysuckle, I didn't think that was possible!
Jeff
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My wife bought four nice sized ones at $15 per. Nursery lady said they may be marginal in our area, but my wife assured her that she was wrong. We'll see. They are a nice looking plant, very healthy and established, and should do well on the fence. I just hope they make the winter. We have some cold spells here. Must get them planted soon so they have a good shot at making it through the winter.
Steve in XXtreme SW Utah, 3700' elev.
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On 7/22/2011 1:11 AM, Steve B wrote:

I just looked up the weather for St George. I'm sending you a dozen eggs to fry on the sidewalk!
The cold hardiness I see listed is 30F. Good luck with yours and we'll catch up next spring.
Jeff

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Where I am at, we get down in the teens, sometime single digits with 30 mph north winds or more.
I don't understand it. My wife said they would grow.
Steve
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Mandevilla, in my experience -- and I am in a mild Mediterranean area -- is very finicky. I tried it a few times, then gave up, and now trying again. So in an area that gets frost -- I dunno...
HB
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On 2011-07-23, Higgs Boson wrote:

There must be varieties of them. I bought two the other day. One says it is not hardy below freezing the other has a tag that says it will with stand temps down to -25. What gives?
--
Bud

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Along that line, I live in Toquerville, Utah. SW Utah, 27 miles north of Arizona line, about the same distance in east of Nevada line. In different gardening books, I am classified as different zones. I am still not sure what zone I am actually in.
I see containers that say good for zone such and such. Unless you're smack in the middle, the outcome could be a tossup.
I brought some birds of paradise back to Las Vegas from San Diego, those ones that grow all over down there. I did not expect them to last past the first summer. They are five years old now, and although not thriving like the ones along the California coast, they are alive and well.
I pretty much go by what the people at the nursery say. A local nursery near my little home town. I just take in what the one twenty miles away says about what will grow where. Just like the labels. And a lot of the staff at those nurseries are told to say anything will grow anywhere, just load it on their truck.
You can position things so they are protected either from wind or sun or cold, and they may perform good. Things might not be supposed to grow here and there, but they do. Then things that should grow don't. I went through eight ocotillos in Vegas under a nursery guarantee, the third and fourth planting being done by their staff, and none of them lived. There was a huge one in the same planter that we started with one cane we stuck in the ground with no soil and no fertilizer, and now it is a monster.
Go figger.
Steve
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There are several species of Mandevilla, some are tender and one is hardy
M. boliviensis, M. splendens (aka Dipladenia), many hybrid Mandevillas such as Alice du Pont are quite tender and will not survive frost.
M. laxa, common name Chilean Jasmine is root hardy to about 5 F.
This comes from Sunset Western Garden Book. I didn't see any info about 'Sun Parasol' but see if your tag says (M. laxa) it should be OK.
Emilie
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wrote:

There are several species of Mandevilla, some are tender and one is hardy
M. boliviensis, M. splendens (aka Dipladenia), many hybrid Mandevillas such as Alice du Pont are quite tender and will not survive frost.
M. laxa, common name Chilean Jasmine is root hardy to about 5 F.
This comes from Sunset Western Garden Book. I didn't see any info about 'Sun Parasol' but see if your tag says (M. laxa) it should be OK.
Emilie
I got the tag, and mine just says Sunparasol "Pretty Crimson Mandevilla." There is no hardiness or temperature rating. I did find on google it is good for zone 8-10. A lookup of my zipcode states I am in zone 8, although I have seen it rated differently. I'll plant it, and see what happens. It should have enough time to get established before winter.
Steve
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