Effective method to prevent emerald ash borer

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Just came across this information on preventing and killing emerald ash borers. I live in Michigan and we are getting infested all over in our area. Trees are dying everywhere and our local municipalities are destroying ash trees which isn't doing a thing except making areas look like wastelands.
Finally we found a tree in our yard that seems to be getting infested now. After some talking around and doing some online research, I have found there might be hope to prevent these borers from killing more trees. Although it could be expensive depending on your situation, there is a product out there called "Bayer Advanced Garden™ Tree and Shrub Insect Control" that has been proven effective on killing/ preventing ash borers. Best of all, it's simple to use. Just mix & pour around the base of the tree and you're done for 12 months.
See this PDF for further info:
http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/E2955.pdf
-- Chris
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Many tree problems are associated with the following help trees vitality. The higer the vitality the better chances you have to healthy trees.
They are Case Sensitive.
Troubles in the Rhizosphere http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
Unhealthy Trees from the Nursery / Improper Planting http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub1.html and Look up "Tree Planting" http://www.treedictionary.com
Improper Mulching - http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub3.html and http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/ Look up "Mulch"
Improper Pruning http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning
Improper Fertilization (See A Touch of Chemistry) http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
Tree Farming and Related Problems http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
Just came across this information on preventing and killing emerald ash borers. I live in Michigan and we are getting infested all over in our area. Trees are dying everywhere and our local municipalities are destroying ash trees which isn't doing a thing except making areas look like wastelands.
Finally we found a tree in our yard that seems to be getting infested now. After some talking around and doing some online research, I have found there might be hope to prevent these borers from killing more trees. Although it could be expensive depending on your situation, there is a product out there called "Bayer Advanced GardenT Tree and Shrub Insect Control" that has been proven effective on killing/ preventing ash borers. Best of all, it's simple to use. Just mix & pour around the base of the tree and you're done for 12 months.
See this PDF for further info:
http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/E2955.pdf
-- Chris
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Pesticides http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/spring.html
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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Just came across this information on preventing and killing emerald ash borers. I live in Michigan and we are getting infested all over in our area. Trees are dying everywhere and our local municipalities are destroying ash trees which isn't doing a thing except making areas look like wastelands.
Finally we found a tree in our yard that seems to be getting infested now. After some talking around and doing some online research, I have found there might be hope to prevent these borers from killing more trees. Although it could be expensive depending on your situation, there is a product out there called "Bayer Advanced GardenT Tree and Shrub Insect Control" that has been proven effective on killing/ preventing ash borers. Best of all, it's simple to use. Just mix & pour around the base of the tree and you're done for 12 months.
See this PDF for further info:
http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/E2955.pdf
-- Chris
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Product pusher. Bayer also claims to be a feeder of trees as well.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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I was thinking about a question you posed a few days ago about Micro nutrients.
We used a local product called green sand and have also used granite dust. We my Dad and I think of these as long term feeding similar I guess to granulated lime. Slow on breaking down. I have not touched green sand for about 30 years. Went with cover crops and chicken waste composted rarely usually just topical and tilled in.
Bill
http://www.google.com/search?q=Marlton%20green%20sand
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade

Balgreen Portal to the Souther Realm
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symplastless said:

You'll learn to sing some other tune when these insects arrive in your neck of the woods. They are a monumental catastrophe. I live near ground zero. Millions of ash trees, in forests and back yards, have been killed. The non-native emerald ash borer attacks healthy trees as well as stressed trees. The skeletons of dead ash in nearby wildlands eerie and obvious. All due to a surprisingly small green beetle.
Long term (maybe very long term indeed), breeding resistant strains of North American ash and finding appropriate biological controls will be needed or the American ash is history.
http://www.emeraldashborer.info /
Should I Replant or Save My Ash? (PowerPoint presentation): http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/ToReplantorProtectAsh.htm
Options for 'do it yourself' homeowners unwilling to give up on their ash trees: http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/E2955.pdf
(As for me, if I had to make a choice, I would the ash tree removed and be done with it.)
Quote from http://www.emeraldashborer.info/homeownerinfo.cfm
"IMPORTANT NOTE: Using insecticides to control EAB on ash trees is an option in Michigan and the EAB quarantined counties in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. If your tree is located within an area designated for eradication or suppression activities, it may be removed by regulatory agencies even if it has been treated. In those cases where government- ordered tree removals occur within the contiguous EAB quarantine counties, consideration will be given to ash trees treated by certified applicators utilizing methods and materials recommended by Michigan State University. If your ash trees are located outside of this area in Michigan, Indiana, Illinois or Ohio, using insecticides may not be recommended. If you are not sure about the regulatory status of your area or whether you should consider insecticides, please contact your county Extension office."
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
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I'm a registered forester in Michigan, Pat.
Ignore this "symplastless" guy... he's a wanna-be forester. Lacking some serious formal education, and thus professional background.
Myself and my colleagues have had to sort through the majority of his posts on this forum.
I do not believe that the American ash is "history", but there is no doubt the bug has done some serious damage to many of our hardwood stands in the central lower peninsula (or "810" area code as I call it - even though the actual problem extends far beyond that area code's boundaries).
I live in Osceola county (just South of Cadillac) and it has been found in my county, but not doing damage to the extent that it did in lower Michigan. I have not yet seen it in a stand up here. I hope it continues that way.
The biggest problem is vectoring. It cannot vector itself very far (maybe a mile or two), but people can vector it very broad and very fast via cars, hence the "moving firewood bugs me" campaign.
Once it gets to a place where there are any form of ash trees, it goes on a feeding frenzy that is like no other.
I've sold timber in Defiance County, Ohio - which was also one of the EAB problem areas, but timber in NW Ohio is scattered enough as to not be a problem for EABs.
EAB resistance is more than likely a futile attempt. The best way to eliminate the problem is to eliminate the hosts where populations of EAB are found. This critter is not known to prey on other trees.
Pat Kiewicz wrote:

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Pat
Please explain how bark forms.
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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I agree that no one should believe anything because I said it. But believe it because they see it for themselves. About wanting to be a forester like you Does that mean I would have to convince people that logging increases forest health? Logging does anything but address issues of trees requirements and their associates. Saying that logging increases forest health is like saying that you can buy a bag of tree food off a shelf. When was the last time Pat fed a tree? Where is Pats dictionary?
I did call Bayer today and they said they sell fertilizer, nitrogen and not tree food and they will look into changing labels.
many docs can be found here on effects of logging. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/hardtoget/index.html
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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Your tree dictionary is a piece of crap, why do you insist on posting here when real, trained biologist point you out as a fraud.
Beware a so called tree biologist who has never studied biology.
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test

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For those interested my dictionary is here: www.treedictionary.com
If anyone else has a dictionary online based on tree biology please post it for review.
BTW, Don Staples, what are you?
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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wrote in message

Your worse nightmare, someone actually trained in biology.
Beware a so called tree biologist who has never studied biology.
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LOL, people are so fiesty on these groups!
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On Aug 8, 7:48 pm, Geoff-consulting forester in the US

I find Symplastless to have a good understanding of trees, theier biology and appropriate care. To ignore him is to dismiss the teachings of Alex Shigo- anyone claiming to understand or know about trees without due regard for Shigo's work is one to be taken with a pinch of salt.
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The point you miss is it is Shigo's work, not Keslicks. A wannabe whose education is a series of 2 and 3 day short courses. I wonder if he is even a member of any national society of arborists.
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Not sure if I missed that point, thank you though. I have no idea of Symplastless's route of education, nevertheless, if he is passing along information tried and tested by Shigo and his cronies, well, no point in dismissing it point in hand. People were not always receptive to Shigo when he began spreading his findings, in fact, I recently read an article where the writer claims that a man invited Shigo outside to pyhsically settle the issue of flush cuts versus branch (bark) collar cuts. In the Uk to become a menber of of the Arboricultural Society is not a matter of simply signing up. Belonging to a prestigious group can, sometimes, mean little more than one is a member of a prestigious group. Consulting a tree surgeon on a local council's recommendation list does not guarantee quality, knowledge or good practice. I have seen work carried out by such contractors, much of it is appalling.
The vicinity in which I live, and work, has many a treeman (mainly all men, in fact I have never seen a woman working with trees around here) who knows nothing about tree biology, little about the mechanics of trees. I have seen all manner of short term thinking in terms of tree care; Situations where a tree surgeon carries out pruning work that lessens the lifespan of trees, unnecessary felling, ruthless pruning etc. I receive phone calls from men looking for jobs who are barely able to identify trees yet alone understand the nature of trees. That Keslick makes an effort speaks well for him, in my book. Many of the men with which I have worked study day release, or simply got their tickets through two-three day courses. Self education has its place. To gain a thorough education in tree work via studying at a national institute is costly and time consuming- many a person, alas, has to work in order to live, and their families cannot afford to support them during three plus years of study. For people to spread the word about good tree care is important for everyone in the industry, from self learners to university educated people. To me the difference between an arboriculturalist and a tree surgeon is education. People have interfered with trees much longer than people have officially, for want of a better word, studied trees. I have seen tree work in the USA and the UK, and both countries have a long way to go before finding a harmony between people and trees. People have all manner of ideas about trees, and not all are interested in trees beyond their intentions, which only feeds into shoddy workmanship.
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Don, how do you know that Keslick has such a meager education? Many arborists in Mass. have a BS degree- or at the minimum a 2 year degree from a reputable arborist school- such as one at U. Mass. Then, they have to get a state license after taking a test.
I took the basic arborist course at U. Mass.- it was one of the best courses I took there- we spent all our time walking the huge campus looking at sick trees.
Joe

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If it is such a good school, why do they have so many sick trees?
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