Ground Beef Recall Expanded

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i've never seen the stunner used on the back of an animal's head. it, like the .22, is positioned in that X between the ears & eyes. the 'stunner' actually kills the animal instantly, so 'stunner' is a misnomer. we used these to kill animals when i was in college in the early 70s. i was an ag major. lee
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They do when hit with the stunner in an abattoir too although I don't know what mechanism it uses to drop them.
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wrote in message

I'm thinking that maybe it's done in different ways. What a concept. We certainly wouldn't want to descend into Om logic and claim it's done the same way everywhere, just because cousin Clevis does it a certain way.
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Dunno, but Wiki has the following: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captive_bolt_pistol
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Oh the whole thought of that is simply heartbreaking to me. I'll never eat meat again of any kind and haven't for years. It has only improved my health as we don't need anywhere near the level of protein nutritionists used to suggest. Actually, it's low on the food pyramid
On Thu, 04 Oct 2007 09:03:17 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

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No indeed bleeeding out is not quick.
But I still believe stunning before bleeding out is a better way of killing. Animals which are killed in the conventional method are kept calm as animals that are upset produce more carcases which get called "dark cutters". This means that the meat loses value - no abattoir aims to do that as its a loss of profits.
Cattle killed in an Abattoir are stunned as soon as they walk through the door and then bled out. It's painless.

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in a slaughtering plant the processing line has a number of stations and each person does one of two "cuts" and then the meat moves on to the next station. companies want that line to go as fast as possible so the precision of gutting the animals is going to determine if the gut is cut or not. at the high speeds of today's lines the gut is going to get cut. example: chickens are dipped into water to wet their feathers so the machine can strip the feathers off and I am sure there is crap in that water that is now distributed well over the whole chicken. Ingrid

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It's not as cut and dried as you are making out. Transmission during slaughter is not an automatic thing which is what you seem to be suggesting.
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General Schvantzkoph wrote:

Bacteria is going to be on the surface of the meat. Inside the meat is sterile. Problem when you grind burger is as you say. That's why it is safe to eat a steak cooked rare but not a hamburger. Chicken are another story. Practically impossible to gut them and keep clean. (You can gut a cow and keep gut off meat.) That's why there is more food poisoning from chicken than beef.
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On Oct 1, 12:58 am, Charlie wrote:

Problem is worst with factory chubs. Too many cows being sent down the line, inevitably a few are going to get their gut contents spilled into the meat.
Either buy in-store ground, or grind your own.
Most recipes that call for ground beef are improved by substituting cubed. Not difficult to do yourself with a sharp, well-maintained knife. Can't understand why ground beef is so popular here.
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cheap (comparatively), easy & it uses up a lot of cuts that most people nowadays don't want or even know what to do with. very few people want roasts (take too long for "busy cooks") & they have no clue what to do when confronted with anything besides a steak or ground beef. before fast food became widely available, there were very few steak houses, because there was nowhere for the other cuts to go. now it just gets ground up & sold as burger. lee
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in

I can usually get chuck cheaper than hamburger. As I say, it improves most recipes that call for the latter. Chili con carne is a good example (*especially* when you substitute beer for water -- gives it an agreeable sweet taste with no identifiable hint of beer). Excellent served over rice. Be adventurous with the beans. Don't just throw in a can of kidney beans -- too boring. Throw in a can each of garbanzos and black beans, too.

Cook it just like ground beef. Sear it in oil with black pepper and a teaspoon of chopped garlic to marry the flavors early. No great culinary skills needed beyond turning on the stove and stirring.

How much is it from how well McDonalds has us trained from childhood?
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And McDonald knows. They get their flavor from smoke stacks in New Jersey.
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Billy

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Creosote? That's occasionally used for smoke flavor, by Burger King in particular, IIRC.
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Ferd, get a grip. You're trying too hard here. Your not bleeding likely to find a wood fire in one of those smoke stacks. You must have been thinking of chimneys. You are a comedien (consider getting a large black board as a visual aid). If you want creosote, go suck on a post. It's cheaper than a whopper. You might want to add some mustard, onion, tomato, and pickle though. No, I was referring to New Jersey as the original "Skunk Works". If it is a smell or a taste, it's made in New Jersey.
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I was serious.
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On Fri, 12 Oct 2007 19:45:07 -0700, Father Haskell
Oopsie!
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I only knew of wood creosote but I know now of coal tar creosote. Neither sounds appetizing or healthy.
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i wouldn't know. there weren't fast food franchises around until i was in my teens (that is, they hadn't really expanded so much. they existed, just not where i lived). i have cookbooks from WWII era & earlier which ask for cuts of meat i *never* see in stores. i can only vaguely remember cutting them in meat cutting class in 1972. i'm afraid i didn't pay close attention since i took the class while in my vegetarian phase. OTOH, i have a 7 year old & hamburgers are way down on his list of foods he'd prefer. i think the current top of the list is artichokes. he loooooves artichokes. lee
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On 10/11/07 8:37 PM, in article
wrote:

And there are cuts now that appear to invented in recent days. Tri-tip anyone

Mine brings wasabi to the rink - for a little fire in her belly. She loves sushi and will try nearly anything once. C
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