Are my tomatoes dead?

Hi
I have had a major tomato crisis and would welcome any advice. I put my seedlings in a plastic greenhouse and had been putting the outside for a few hours a day. Unfortunately there was a very hot spell and by the time I had got t them they had seriously wilted. I opened the greenhouse, moved the into the shade and gave them a good drink of water. Now a lot of them have crispy brown leaves and are looking somewha dead. Are they beyond salvation. I would welcome any advice. Many thanks Chri
-- CringleB
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On Mon, 12 May 2008 13:34:10 +0100, CringleB wrote:

They sound dead, fortunately tomato plants are cheap. I tried to raise tomatoes from seed last year because I wanted to grow some heirloom varieties. They all keeled over and died before I could transplant them so I went back to the old reliable garden center plants.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

What he said... but....
Was there any sense of revival in the first few hours?
Tomatoes are a very vascular plant and if there's going to be a hint of revival, it usually happens pretty quickly.
When is dead, not dead?
What we'd do, depends on the answers to the above questions and our time frame...
Likely we'd move to plan B right away and if there was any hint of life in the plants, we would continue to care for them for awhile.
If they survived, we'd have even more tomatoes........ :-)
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*snip*

*snip*
When they're tomatoes. We had some that got killed off by a frost, and replaced them. A couple weeks later, we've got plants coming back up from the roots of the dead ones.
While it's not a bad idea to replace your plants now, hang on to the others for a while more yet and see if they do anything.
Puckdropper
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You can only do so much with caulk, cardboard, and duct tape.

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On Mon, 12 May 2008 13:34:10 +0100, CringleB

I would keep them for a few days and see what happens. If all of the leaves are dead, forget it.
On clear day my greenhouse can go from 60F to 80F from sunrise to 2 hours later. plants survive in the greenhouse when the temperature get to 100F. I try not to let them stay in that temperature too long. On the other hand, our outdoor temperatures can get to 100F and the tomatoes do just fine. They may not set fruit, but they certainly don't die.
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Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
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Give then 24 hrs. If there is no sign of recovery, you're probably screwed. This is a learning situation. We've all done it:o) I'd suggest replacement from the nursery but I would also start more seeds. If nothing else, it is good practice.
--

Billy

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I think they were cooked. They were baked to death.

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