clorox anywhere spray

Page 3 of 3  
Michael A. Ball wrote:

I doubt they had O.R. supervisors or infection control nurses in his Aunt's time. Correct me if i am wrong but it IS surgical spirits isn't it? It's still being used in some hospital operating theatres today, maybe not in the USA, I wouldn't know that but certainly some hospitals are still grateful for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had not heard the term "surgical spirits before you used it--yesterday. I just now looked it up. "Surgical spirit: ethanol to which has been added a small amount of methanol to render it unfit to drink. It is used to sterilize surfaces and to cleanse skin abrasions and sores."
You might already know this, but ethanol (ethyl alcohol, a.k.a. grain alcohol), an accepted toxin, is a two carbon atom substance. Methanol (methyl alcohol, a.k.a. wood alcohol), a recognized and avoided toxin, is a single carbon atom substance.
Even ethyl alcohol is too random and inconsistent to be suitable for OR. Of course, there are OR where anything would be appreciated. Even with what we have here in the US, the incidence of nosocomial [hospital-acquired] infections is unbelievably high.
A dog's life is too short; their only fault really.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael A. Ball" wrote:

Forty years. She was a supervisor. Big pension. Lots of new cars.

But you recommended it for shopping carts.

killing germs these days, phenol is less common than other phenolics. It's used in Noxema shaving cream for sensitive skin. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 15:42:32 GMT, BeesMom9905

To each his own.
Nan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Where does killing mold fall into this list? I am extremely sensitive (allergic) to mold and need to clean up a few places in my home where it has formed over the winter. I was wondering what would be best to use to clean it. The windowsills and lower edges of the aluminum windows are the biggest place. These would be over the wooden windowsills.
Thanks Jann

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

From: http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/home/articles/0128ho7fill0126.html
"The product contains sodium hypochlorite, the same compound used in household bleach but in a much lower concentration that's more akin to pool water. The product contains 0.0095 percent sodium hypochlorite, compared with 3 to 6 percent for household bleach. advertisement The lower concentration makes it less effective at killing germs than a disinfectant, and it does not kill viruses or other microorganisms."
Here is the MSDS: http://tinyurl.com/rn6vh Boring.
If you can do the math, you can make the product. I urge you to note the limitations of this product.
There are many ways to achieve your goal. You might consider a restaurant type, quaternary ammonium chloride disinfectant. They have no perfumes, zero (or Very close) detergent, leave virtually no residue, require no rinsing and are nontoxic at in-use dilution--which can be up to 1:512, depending on the product. Note: proper dilution for this grade of product is essential.
Whatever it takes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael A. Ball" wrote:

I don't know who wrote that description, but hypochlorites are considered generally effective against viruses and other microorganisms. They take time to work, and a dilute solution will probably work faster. A drawback to a dilute solution is that it won't disinfect a surface with a lot of organic matter. If you mix your own with baking soda, you can make whatever concentration you please. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I do not see any flaw in the description. They don't dispute the efficacy of hypochlorites against microbes. The product is a sanitizer: not a disinfectant. At "0.0095 percent sodium hypochlorite," they admit it is not viruscidal. Especially true, in the hands of untrained users.
I'm not sure why you think, "a dilute solution will probably work faster," but I disagree. I do agree that a weak solution is quickly inactivated by organics; but a sufficient organic load will inactivate a Strong sodium hypochlorite solution. Chlorine excels for a very small number of applications, but is by no means considered a good microbicide.
My chemistry is not very good; so, please tell us what adding baking soda does to one's sodium hypochlorite solution. I bet baking soda would really clog a trigger sprayer! :-)
Play with fire! Zildjan drum sticks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael A. Ball" wrote:

microorganisms." Used correctly, it does kill them. That's why it's useful in swimming pools and drinking water.
Chlorine treatments make oxygen available to react with organic matter including microbes. If there's much organic matter in a pool or drinking water, the oxygen may be depleted. The same is true of trying to disinfect a dirty surface. You could use a stronger hypochlorite solution. A stronger solution lasts longer, but it bleaches more slowly because the pH is higher, making less oxygen available in the solution at any moment.
At the local restaurant, they disinfect (or sanitize) dishes in the rinse water so that there's not much organic matter to react with the bleach. The proper concentration is something like a tablespoon per gallon. Dilution reduces the pH so that enough oxygen is available for the quick killing of microbes. The Board of Health checks. If there's too much bleach,the solution is not considered effective enough.
A public pool may need a stronger solution because people might otherwise bring enough organic matter to deplete the oxygen. An acidic salt is used to bring the pH down to a point where there's enough oxygen in the water to kill germs fairly fast. I wouldn't use it at home because too much of the salt could cause the bleach to release chlorine gas.
Baking soda is a buffer that tends to bring a solution to a pH around 8. That's too high to release chlorine but low enough to make household bleach fairly quick. The buffering makes the mix easy on the skin, and the bleach smell is easier to rinse away.
A dilute solution of baking soda and bleach cleans out bottles better than bleach and detergent. A paste of bleach and baking soda whitens grout better than bleach alone. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You are mixing too many apples, oranges, and mystery fruits, but I will address this paragraph.
When you use the word "it", what are you referring to? The Clorox spray? Sodium hypochlorite? Or chlorine?
1. "It" as the Clorox spray product will not inactivate viruses--no matter how it is used: correctly or incorrectly. 0.0095% is not a toxic level dose of chlorine.
2. "It" as in sodium hypochlorite is not used to chlorinate drinking water.
3. "It" as chlorine is used in pools and in drinking water. A chlorinator draws from a liquefied chlorine tank and injects gaseous chlorine into the water.
So, depending on what "it" means, and in which sentence, I agree with you--or disagree.
From: http://www.clorox.com/innovations_anywhere.php "It's the perfect solution for sanitizing around the home throughout the day. And, Clorox has done away with all those harmful chemical residues in typical sanitizers and made a spray that you can feel confident using in your busy home. All you have to do is spray and go!
Clorox Anywhere Hard Surface spray kills 99.9% of bacteria including E. coli, salmonella, staph and strep."
This seems to contradict what the Arizona Republic published. However, "other microorganisms" could include anything from rickettsia to prions. I enjoy the language of advertising! :-)
I nearly forgot! In another post, you wrote, "Citrus packers have found household bleach and baking soda to be the most effective disinfectant for washing fruit. I think their mixture amounts to a teaspoon of bleach and a teaspoon of baking soda per quart of water."
Your fascination with bleach and baking soda is amusing, but I'll have to do my homework before I decide how scientific it is.
Percussion: a masterful mix of speed, force and finesse.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Michael A. Ball" wrote:

The line I quoted is from the paragraph you quoted. Did you quote it without knowing what they were talking about? They clearly said they were talking about Clorox spray and that this is dilute sodium hypochlorite.

What is the toxic dose of bleach for a bacteria cell? It would take a certain concentration of salt, for example, to kill the cell, but it takes only chlorate anion. As I recall, a gram molecular weight of bleach can produce 6 x 10^24 chlorate anions.
Paradoxically, with a dilute solution, such as 0.0095%, you won't have to wait so long for an anion to find the germ because there will be more anions in the water than in a 5% solution.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_purification Scroll to Disinfection.

That is sometimes the most economical way to put chlorate anions into drinking water. It's tricky in pools because swimmers can end up in hydrochloric acid.

http://www.fao.org/Wairdocs/X5403E/x5403e05.htm That says 0.005% to 0.01% sodium hypochlorite, roughly the same as the Chlorox spray, is a rule of thumb for packing citrus fruit.
The paper in question is 98-020 "Use of Sodium Bicarbonate in a High Pressure Scale Washer for the Control of Postharvest Mold of Citrus Fruit," dated December 31, 2000. It was prepared for the California Department of Pesticide Regulation by Paul Sorenson, Principal Investigator for Sunkist Growers Inc.
The concentration of sodium hypochlorite was 200 ppm, a little higher than usual. The bicarbonate brought the pH down to 8.3-8.4, which allowed 13% of the chlorate to be available.
Spraying the bleach solution alone didn't reduce decay at all. Spraying with sodium ortho-phenyl phenate, followed by the bleach solution at 100 psi reduced decay by 4.5% Adding 3% sodium bicarbonate to the bleach solution reduced decay about 77% if dipped 35 seconds and 78.7% if sprayed at 100 psi.
This was a worst-case scenario, using oranges 5 days old. Tests with oranges less than 36 hours old showed nearly 100% decay control.
So baking soda can increase the efficacy of bleach from 0% to approximately 100%, and that's at a concentration of 200 ppm, which I think you consider "not a toxic level dose". *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BeesMom9905 wrote:

I don't know what's in that spray.
Citrus packers have found household bleach and baking soda to be the most effective disinfectant for washing fruit. I think their mixture amounts to a teaspoon of bleach and a teaspoon of baking soda per quart of water.
I use it in the kitchen. The baking soda helps the bleach work faster, helps it remove greasy films, and makes it milder to the hands. Once mixed, the shelf life is short, maybe less than a day. I keep some bleach in a detergent bottle and some baking soda in a shaker so I can mix some disenfectant in a jiffy. For some uses I add less water. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.