clorox anywhere spray

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This seems wonderful, but I was wondering if anyone knew what it is made up of, and if there is anything else that can be sprayed to almost anything to sanitize. I have a new crawler and a 1st grader, so I would need gallons of this stuff. I know if I buy a bottle, I'll be hooked and thought before doing that, I would search it out to see if there is a homemade way of doing it...
Thanks for any info you can offer, Monique
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Soap and water will SANITIZE most anything. The word "sanitize" has a specific meaning. It is almost synonymous with "clean." Do buy into the advertising hype. Basically you have in ascending order:
clean sanitize disinfect sterilize
Cleaning removes gross debris and dilutes organisms by physical means such as rinsing. Sanitizing will kill some organisms (many harmless), but it doesn't kill many pathogens. Disinfecting will kill many pathogens, but not all. There are different levels of disinfecting, the best being "hospital grade." This level will kill TB spores and HIV, but not hepatitis B. Sterilizing kill everything.
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Thanks for your input. So there really is not a homemade spray that can do what this claims. I just thought the ease of spraying down the toys between soap and water cleanings would be wonderful.
Monique
wrote:

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I would just spray them down with soap and water. The sanitizer really won't be any better. You could always use a 10% solution of bleach and water if the items are color safe. In dental offices, the most popular surface disinfectant (better than sanitizer) is Birex http://www.biotrol.com/SurfaceCleaners/index.htm
If you can get your hands on some of that, it would be much better than a sanitizer. Alcohol is a sanitizer.
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Wonderful advice - Thank You!
wrote:

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On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 23:12:09 GMT, BeesMom9905

You wash toys? I've never met anyone that does that, unless they're a home daycare provider.
I've wiped down my daughter's toys if they get particularly dirty or gunky, but I think washing and sanitizing toys is just too time-consuming and ends up as one of those things that makes it even more difficult for kids to build up their immune systems.
Nan
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yeah, I do. My son had his first ear infection a week after birth, and has had them on and off since that time. He has an older brother who brings home all his immune system can take on, from school, so I think he shouldn't be left to also fight off anything from his home. He's facing having his adenoids removed in coming months.

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New question - People are carrying bottles of rubbing alcohol w/ them for shopping carts and public toilets, can this be diluted to any degree to quickly disinfect from a spray bottle ?? And most importantly, not be harmful to kids, pets etc. Just curious.
Thank You, Monique
On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 15:42:32 GMT, BeesMom9905

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BeesMom9905 wrote:

What Michael said, quaternary ammonium stuff. They're pretty cheap and reliable. Phenolics are also cheap and reliable.
I think nurses use rubbing alcohol because it dissolves skin oil and leaves no residue. If you spray much of it, it's expensive. If you dilute it, it's less effective. There's an important type of bacteria that it doesn't kill.
Germs don't seem to survive on some surfaces. Years ago, scientists took cultures from various kinds of hand holds in the New York Subway. They didn't find dangerous germs. *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com *** *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
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wrote:

Quats, such as the blue Lysol liquid, have two primary weaknesses. They have no residual killing power and they are not tuberculocidal. There are some relative new products that are still called quats, but are tuberculocidal.
Phenolics, such as the brown Lysol liquid, are highly corrosive and toxic to humans. It is tuberculocidal and does have bacteriostatic properties. Of course, that residue is what corrodes surfaces--or skin.
Hospital grade quats or phenolics do have a low in-use cost, because they are so concentrated, but they still cost about $25.00 per gallon. Common dilutions are 1:128 or 1:256. Since I already have plenty of water, I buy the most concentrated products, because it saves on shipping.
Experience is something you don't get--until just after you need it.
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On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 17:00:48 GMT, BeesMom9905

I clean everything with alcohol. Go to a Dollar store or buy the Wal-mart brand. They're cheap and just as good as the name brand. I never dilute it. Pour it into a spray bottle. I doubt, since it evaporates, that it is harmful in any way. -- Piper
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That's what I was thinking too. Very affordable at .50 a bottle, and brings peace of mind w/ kids and animals running around the house.
Thanks Piper for your response. Monique
On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 17:40:51 -0600, Piper

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BeesMom9905 wrote:

Are you serious? What on earth is it coming to, cleaning shopping trolleys? cleaning public toilets? dear oh dear

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Well, just what is "it"? And what do you think it is coming to? LOL :-) I know what "it" is, but I do not know where it will end. Maybe Tyvek gear and full-face respirators for all. :-)
Today, I heard a successful businessman say that he would never sit in a motel bathtub.
Microbiology and pathology are so interesting.
Whatever it takes.
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Michael A. Ball wrote:

I would think one would have more chance of liver failure from the rubbing alcohol or possibly burning to death from a leaky bottle of surgical spirit and a carelessly thrown dog -end than the chance of expiring from a supermarket trolley handle infection-but I could be wrong.

perhaps he prefers showers? I am always wary of Norman Bates type characters when I shower in hotels

Indeed.
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Mrs Bonk wrote:

The average toilet seat has 40 germs per square inch. A keyboard as 4,000. A telephone has 25,000. Some viruses that cause colds can survive 72 hours on a surface.
I think the danger from bathrooms is food handlers who don't wash their hands. Phones and desktop stuff are exposed to hands and coughing. Janitors aren't asked to sanitize them because they don't look dirty.
Pennies tend to be sterile because of the copper. Coins in general are pretty clean because several metals kill germs. Dollar bills are the dirtiest because they pass through so many hands, but the germs are generally harmless. For example, lots of people have stapholococcus aureus, which is dangerous, in their nose, but it seems not to survive on money. One reason is that most hands have lots of stapholococcus epidermidis, and it protects us from s. aureus. You should never clean under your nails because that's where the protective bacteria lie in wait. If you see your surgeon washing his hands, fire him.

Would you like me to tell Mother you and Michael are ridiculing me?

Get a room, you two!
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wrote:

You are wrong. The mother of a good friend contracted salmonella from a cart. She was elderly and nearly died but for a wise doctor who questioned everything she did and everywhere she'd been. -- Piper
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Piper wrote:

"nearly died" doesn't count !
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Piper wrote:

Do you mean he couldn't diagnose her illness until he'd found out everything she did and everywhere she'd been? How did he find which cart she'd used? How many days had it been since she'd been exposed? How long would salmonella survive on a handle?
Salmonella is everywhere. That's a reason it's wise to wash hands before handling food.
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I believe you are thinking of Staph, but, if you can show a reference to document your statement, I'll stand corrected.
School - Four walls with tomorrow inside.
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