what is the value of a sears craftsman10 inch radial arm saw model no. 113.29411

On 10/24/2015 8:53 AM, John McCoy wrote:

1. Horizontal hole boring. yes I did that with mine many years ago. 2. Works more like a shaper, if using a molding head cutter, than a TS. 3. Can be used as a planer, Yes I did that too to flatten a butcher block surface with a planer cutter attachment.

I first bought a RAS in 1979 and used it to build numerous pieces of furniture including our current bed room dresser.
They have their uses.
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A RAS is the Bees Knees for cross-cutting dadoes.
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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote in

Thanks to you and Leon both. None of those applications had occured to me (and, to be honest, I've never seen a RAS used except for the ancient monster the lumberyard uses for crosscuts).
John
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On 10/26/2015 11:47 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Image posted to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking says all...
--

Digger



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On Saturday, October 24, 2015 at 9:56:10 AM UTC-4, John McCoy wrote:

Up until a few years ago I was involved in an activity that involved cutting steel plates, anywhere from 1/4" to 1/2" thick. Some of the plates were up to 12" wide.
Multiple (multiple) passes with an abrasive blade on a radial arm saw worked great. With the steel clamped securely to the table, I could make some very accurate cuts. I had jigs for some of the odd shaped pieces that I needed. Multiple slow, shallow cuts were the trick.
I tried my miter saw with an abrasive blade for some of the smaller items but the RAS did a much better job. I had much more control since the height adjustment of the RAS determined the depth of cut and the speed was determined by how fast I moved the blade across the material.
You just had to make sure that everything was secured properly. Keeping track of where the sparks flew was important too. ;-)
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On 10/27/2015 12:47 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

[snip]

That's a use I'd not have thought of or, if I did, I'd worry like crazy about metal filings/dust winding up inside the motor. Did you take any precautions against this?
I tore the crap out of an homeowner grade Skillsaw removing some 90 year old maple flooring. Not sure if it was the ten coats of varnish and grit that got sucked in or the remnants of the occasional nail I'd hit.
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On Wednesday, October 28, 2015 at 10:08:06 AM UTC-4, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Actually, I was lucky enough to use a friend's RAS so it wasn't a concern to me. ;-) I don't recall that he had modified the RAS in any way.
His garage was set up as a shop almost exclusively for working on Soap Box Derby cars. We worked together as a team, making parts for our kid's cars. This was back when fabricating parts was still allowed.
Here is the rear axle mounting system for my son's World Championship car:
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/photobucket-2663-1399345879852_zpsf3c61506.jpg
The 4 piece axle mount was bolted to the large steel plate which was bolted and epoxied to the wooden floorboard. (The axle itself is that 3/4" x 3/4" bar running horizontally through the mount.) All of the parts for the mount, including the large plate were cut on the RAS.
Here's a picture of the car itself. That little slit under the helmet is all that my son could see through. Unless you looked straight along the top of the car, you couldn't tell if he was in it or not.
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/photobucket-10369-1399345975500_zps65263f4d.jpg
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

I think that people only see the angle-cut benefit of the RAS and don't see the depth control.
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On 10/30/2015 4:26 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Strange you should say that. The RAS can consistently cut at a certain height but if your material differs in thickness slightly so will your depth of cut. A TS will give you consistent depth control even with different thickness material.
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On 10/30/2015 10:13 AM, Leon wrote:

The importance of which will depend on whether you are interested in the depth of the kerf or the depth of the remaining material.
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A tS is great for sheets and ripping. Cross cutting is difficult. (try to crosscut a 15' 2x4.) Or make that a 4x4.
A RAS is great for cutoff and nominal sheet. Good for ripping.
So it depends on what you do. Make cabinets or other things.
Martin
On 10/30/2015 9:13 AM, Leon wrote:

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On 10/30/2015 9:59 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

Preaching to the choir. I have owned both, actually started with a RAS and built furniture for 4~5 years with that RAS.
IMHO cross cutting on a TS is easier when cutting wide stock, and with a sled probably easier. I think the most difficult part on a TS is squaring the end of a 15' piece of what ever. Either way I cut with a jigsaw to a manageable length and what I would do with a RAS also, you still have to deal with long stock tipping after being cut.

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wrote:

Sometimes that's a problem but often a benefit. If you want to make a box of a certain size, indexing off the outside is a benefit. The problem with the RAS is that the arm is never rigid enough. There is a lot of torque on the arm and it doesn't take much to throw the depth off.
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On 10/30/15 10:31 PM, krw wrote:

Yep. Even when perfectly set up, many of them dip a little at the end of the pull. Enough to make a sloppy dado/rabbet.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 10/31/2015 9:34 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

...

Only if it's a cheap POS (which, unfortunately, many are).
I've never had the issue w/ the old Delta 16" nor would one have w/ an Original Saw Company model or one of that ilk. Even the old 10" DeWalt if set up properly is perfectly adequate for the task.
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On Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 7:44:02 AM UTC-7, Sandra wrote:

There is a craftsman radial saw for sale on the internet for $70 with a table and cabinetright now in good condition
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

Don't you imagine Sandra has found one by now? It's been nearly three years since she posted that...
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It's not about what it's "worth", it's about what someone else will pay for it, and I think it's a buyers market on these things. Search craigslist in some relevant locales.
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On Thursday, September 26, 2013 at 9:44:02 AM UTC-5, Sandra wrote:

where u located I am interested in a radial arm saw like $125.00 if u are close to me in Oklahoma
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On Mon, 25 Dec 2017 16:46:45 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I might sell mine for that (with the recall kit, if I can find it) and at least I'm in the same year you're in, if not anywhere near Oklahoma. ;-)
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