Rot in window sill

I have a redwood window sill that has a current 1/2" x 3" x3/4" deep spot of rot. It has been treated 2 or 3 times over twenty years and filled. It continues to rot around the fill. In addition to the wood stabalizer should some type of rot inhibitor be used? If so what is recomended. Thanks CP
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On 10/20/2016 4:44 PM, MOP CAP wrote:

With the time and cost of materials you are spending on trying to save the sill, it would be cheaper to replace it.
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says...

Replace it before it rots through and the framing underneath starts to go.
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Is it trapping water, for some reason? Is water sitting on the sill after a storm?
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"MOP CAP" wrote in message
I have a redwood window sill that has a current 1/2" x 3" x3/4" deep spot of rot. It has been treated 2 or 3 times over twenty years and filled. It continues to rot around the fill. In addition to the wood stabalizer should some type of rot inhibitor be used? If so what is recomended. Thanks CP
CP, first fix the leak that's causing the rotting.
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On 10/20/2016 9:14 PM, tdacon wrote:

Do you have a fix to prevent rain?
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"Leon" wrote in message

Don't be disingenuous, Leon. It doesn't become you.
Tom
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Have you considered the possibility that the window sill in question is on the exterior side?
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Prattlers. They always have something to say, even if they have nothing to say.
One suggested that the sill be replaced. By that reasoning, if you get an ingrown toe nail you should amputate your leg and get a prosthetic leg.
Another said "find the leak and fix it". The leak is the sky.
Not one prattler has addressed the original question.
Is there some type of rot inhibitor?
CP
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On 10/22/2016 12:00 PM, MOP CAP wrote:

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=redwood+rot+inhibitor
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On 10/22/2016 12:36 PM, Tim Daneliuk wrote:

And the very first hit there is:
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/redwood-rot-99622.html
Which - among other things - says this - the very same things others here have said:
--------------------------
Physical Rot Prevention
The major cause of rot in redwood is persistent moisture. Even redwood's resistance to cracking and rot will eventually diminish if the wood becomes wet and stays that way, so the first step to making redwood virtually rot-proof is to ensure that doesn't happen. Decks need to be designed in such a way as to ensure that moisture cannot pool on the surface, which ought to prevent the planks from rotting. Any deck or fence post that is placed in an area where water naturally pools needs to be set so as to better protect that part of the post that is underground. For minor problems, set the post in concrete and then sculpt the top of that concrete plug so it slopes downhill and away from the fence post. For severe problems, dig a drainage ditch or install an underground drainage canal. Refinishing for Rot Prevention
The other way to keep moisture, and thereby rot, out of redwood is to either seal the redwood to repel moisture directly, or to top up the redwood's natural water-repellent qualities. The former course involves the application of two or more coats of outdoor water sealant. This is often used for decks, but can just as easily be applied to any other outdoor redwood application. The latter course involves applying a wood oil finish to the redwood, and perhaps the most logical type of oil to use is redwood oil,
--------------------------
The "rot inhibitor" you're looking for is to *prevent the wood from staying wet*. If you cannot - because as in this case it is an exterior sill - you have to let the wood dry, remove the rot and finish it with a sealer. Since this is not trivial to do, there is the reasonable suggestion above to replace the bad piece of wood.
Public Service Announcements: It's ill mannered to call people names when they're trying to help you.
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On Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 12:00:49 PM UTC-5, MOP CAP wrote:

Well, obviously, your previous fixes and/or preventative maintenances haven't worked, for the long term.
Change the damn sill, asshole, and have it slope about 8 to 15 degrees, downward/outward, as it should be, then paint or seal it.
Additionaly, don't powerwash your windows (and doors), including facings, in the future! And don't install nails/screws/hooks in it, when decorating for holidays, etal.
Sonny
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says...

Yeah, its' called "new redwood".
<plonk>
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Thank you all for your replies.
CP
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On 10/22/2016 12:00 PM, MOP CAP wrote:

Couldn't just put a bandage on it?
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Sure.
The best for home use is probably copper napthanate. It is a pretty green. Another uses tin, it is clear. Borates are another that is clear but it uses water as a vehicle, no if the wood gets wet.
Undeniably, the best fix is to replace the sill, assuring it slopes properly and has a drip cut. If you don't want to do that, about the best you could so is remove ALL of the bad wood, fill with thickened epoxy, prime and paint.
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On 2016-10-22 21:31:24 +0000, dadiOH said:

Thank you.
CP
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On 10/22/2016 5:31 PM, dadiOH wrote:

If the OP is determined to keep the sill, then one solution is to cover it with Aluminum or plastic sheeting. I have seen bad windows sills "fixed" that way when the owner had the siding replaced with vinyl.
However the sill will keep rotting underneath and eventually the sill will have to be replaced.
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If it's painted/stained, it shouldn't rot unless it's sitting in water. That's why I asked if it was trapping water somehow.

You can look at rotdoctor.com. I've used some of their stuff successfully but the root cause is still water where it shouldn't be.
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How about opening the window, sticking a level on the sill in various places and be sure that there are no "hollows" and that there is a good 5 deg or more slope away from the window?
If there isn't then crank up the tools and fix it.
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