Metalwork - Rusty Weather Vane - Remove, Then Prevent Rust

Asking for a friend...
The image below is part of a steel weather vane. As you can see, it's rusty and getting worse. My friend wants to remove the rust then clear coat the piece to
prevent the rust from coming back.
You can't really tell from the image, but there appears to already be some type of (uneven) clear coat on the piece already.
What's the process to remove the rust and existing coating without damaging the metal and what's the proper product to prevent the rust from coming back?
https://i.imgur.com/bk3eTz5.jpg
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 1:58:29 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

ty and

ce to

e type

ng the

Derby, there is a polymer that converts rust to an epoxy like substance. C ar restorers and repair shops know about it. I first ran across it in the late 80's. Now, it would be nice if I could tell you the trade name, but t he memory files are rather spotty back that far. ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 8:15:47 AM UTC-4, Dr. Deb wrote:

usty and

iece to

ome type

ging the

k?

Car restorers and repair shops know about it. I first ran across it in th e late 80's. Now, it would be nice if I could tell you the trade name, but the memory files are rather spotty back that far. ;-)
The rust is really just surface rust. I don't know if there is even enough to "convert". Besides, I think it would come out very uneven, consider that the rust is uneven and t he owner wants the bare (but protected) metal to show.
I think whatever clear coating is on there should come off too since it obv iously isn't providing any protection.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    I'd say that the clear coating has worked, otherwise all of it would be rusty. I suspect that the coating developer a small hole, and the rust began there. You're options are to remove all the loose coating, the rust, and then refinish. And inspect regularly, it can be yearly, before the start of the rainy season, what ever.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 12:36:26 PM UTC-4, pyotr filipivich wrote:

s rusty and

e piece to

e some type

amaging the

back?

e. Car restorers and repair shops know about it. I first ran across it in the late 80's. Now, it would be nice if I could tell you the trade name, but the memory files are rather spotty back that far. ;-)

gh to "convert". Besides, I

d the owner wants the

obviously isn't providing

If it developed a hole, then it didn't work.

Uh, yeah. That was pretty much the idea behind my post. I know what needs t o be done. I'm looking for suggestions on the best methods and products for actu ally doing it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    If you expect anything to work until the end of time, well, the only thing that does that is prayer, and the Good Lord. After that, "there will be a time when it is not." B-)
    Things wear out in this vale of tears.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 5:31:45 PM UTC-4, pyotr filipivich wrote:

The weather vane was purchased in late March 2020, at one of the last crafts events held this year. (Only 100 people allowed on the grounds at any given time)
The unit has been outside for barley 2 months, not factoring in how long or where the craftsman himself stored it.
"The end of time" is a bit of a stretch expectations-wise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(PDT) typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Wow. That shows a failure of some sort. Choice of materials, application, conditions.

    Yep.
    Although I've been in companies which seem to expect to have it possible that nothing ever will go wrong. Maybe I'm old, cynical, and pessimistic, but planning for the worst helps to keep it from happening.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 May 2020 05:41:05 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I think if he wants it "raw metal" with no rust I'd have it blasted and spray it with cold galvanize.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 3:55:00 PM UTC-4, Clare Snyder wrote:

s rusty and

e piece to

e some type

amaging the

back?

e. Car restorers and repair shops know about it. I first ran across it in the late 80's. Now, it would be nice if I could tell you the trade name, but the memory files are rather spotty back that far. ;-)

gh to "convert". Besides, I

d the owner wants the

obviously isn't providing

I'll lend him my box of crushed walnut shells. I'd want them all back thoug h.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Does it contain Phosphoric Acid?
I think that's the key ingredient in many rust removal/conversion products.
Puckdropper
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 1:58:29 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Have it sand blasted, using walnut shell or similar blasting medium. I've had several small items sand blasted for $10-$20 each. Those blasting guys know how to take care of delicate items, if/when need be.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Another option, use a 3M ROLOC disk in whatever you've got. Ideally it's a die grinder but you can chuck in a Rotozip or a router motor or whatever you've got that will take a 1/4 inch shaft and can be adjusted to run below 20,000 RPM. It will work in a drill but it's happier if it's running faster.
National Auto Parts has a nice little starter set for around (IIRC) 12 bucks that usually hangs in the paint section. Tell the person behind the counter that you want some ROLOCs and if he or she isn't completely new on the job they'll know what you're talking about.
There will typically be some fine residue left--it's just dust, clean it off with whatever you like to use for paint prep.
Personally I wouldn't go with a clear coat--clear coat doesn't have any UV resistance to speak of, even if it says it does, and any of it is going to break down after a while. Personally I'd give is a coat of ZRC Cold Galvanizing (order it on Amazon--there's a similar Rust-Oleum product that is not generally as well regarded) and then paint it whatever color I liked--if you want it to have a metallic appearance there are metallic paints in rattle cans.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 11:02:42 AM UTC-4, Spalted Walt wrote:

I have a number of those items. I'd be worried about scratching the surface or burnishing some areas and leaving different colored spots.

That list of over 1000 items would need to be narrowed down to epoxy that is made to handle all sorts of weather, temps from below 0 to over 100, UV safe, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 May 2020 23:58:26 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Naval jelly? (AKA Phosphoric Acid (AKA Coke)) ' Then coat with clear something or other (at least every year or two).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It won't remove rust. Though they say their rust remover will, sorta, but not an better than steel wool and phosphoric acid. Boeshield does a good job of covering things like table saw tables (I use it) but I sure wouldn't use it on an exterior application like a weathervane. This needs to be something intended for exterior use (UV exposure, and all).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/25/2020 1:58 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I have mentioned this before. Wood glue, like TB III will remove rust. Put a small amount on the rusty spot, let it set about a minute and remove. Works like a charm when I get a glob of glue on my cast iron TS top.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, May 25, 2020 at 1:50:22 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

I'll pass the tip along, but your table saw probably doesn't have any kind of clear coat finish on it. I suspect that the issue with this object is a combination of normal rusting and something to do with whatever kind of finish is on the metal.
It was purchased at a crafts show. I wonder if my friend has a receipt or a business card from the vendor. I'm guessing he knows what he put on his metal work and the best way to get the finish off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 May 2020 12:52:55 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

On organic coating will really work any better than automobile paint. Sandblast it, then have it painted by an auro body painter.
Or, sandblast it and have it electroplated with zinc. One canl then have it painted.
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.