holy crap, high end furniture assembled with nails everywhere.

I was wrong all these years. I always thought you glued and clamped. My wife dragged me to this high end store , in a very high end town.
A lot of the furniture was nailed together,some with the nails still exposed, some plugged with filler.
I have to say I have never seen high end stuff nailed and with the nails showing both on the outside where the shelves were nailed with a air nailer and left unfilled. And the right angle corners and face frame had the nail holes showing. this on a nice looking piece aside from this distraction.
Another piece had nail holes filled with a non-matching filler... Drawers were nailed together.
I saw many useless barn door sliding hardware pieces that were over used, and they didn't roll well.
The price was high for all pieces.
So my wife wanted me to reproduce piece.. I said shit.. no problem it's just nailed. But I think I'll add glue, and maybe drop the nails..
--
Jeff

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wrote:

So you'd cheat people out of the nails they've paid for?
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On Sun, 14 May 2017 18:33:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

NEVER!!!! I'd glue a box of nails into the corner on the underside- - - - - -
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On Sun, 14 May 2017 20:14:55 -0400, clare wrote:

Nice to see the tradition of solid customer service lives on in the East!
Cheers, Colin
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On Sunday, May 14, 2017 at 6:13:52 PM UTC-4, woodchucker wrote:

Maybe Norm put the nails there while the glue dried.
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On Sun, 14 May 2017 17:27:35 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Well, at least they left some exposed so they'd be easier to pull after the glue dried.
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I feel your pain     

and let her know what it's really worth.
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On 5/14/2017 5:13 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Some people are fooled into thinking high priced means high end.
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wrote:

And many more are fooled into thinking "hand made" means quality - - - -
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca writes:

And some people are fooled into thinking that nailed furniture is bad :-)
Quality is in the eye of the beholder, methinks.
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 17:27:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Sure, some even buy from Ikea. Kitchens, no less!
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On Sunday, May 14, 2017 at 5:13:52 PM UTC-5, woodchucker wrote:

I agree with Leon and cl snyder.ca. Just because something costs a lot of money or is handmade, does not mean its good quality. And on the flip side , because something is nailed does not mean its bad either. Everything is tied together. Materials, construction technique, design. I'll admit to m aking a box with handcut through dovetails. But it still did not turn out to be a fine piece of work worthy of a museum.
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 12:52:44 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

I disagree. I can't imagine *any* reason to use nails on furniture.
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 21:34:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

For upholstery is the only use I want nails then I really do not want to see them, not even the trim ones. YMMV as well as taste.
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 21:34:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Particularly where they can be seen. In cabinetry sometimes a few brads are in order.
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Probably just a fad. I remember huge pieces of furniture made with 2X6s, 2 x8s, and even bigger that were stained nearly black and called "Mediterrane an". Doubtful they would have taken credit for it.
I remember when heavy, clear finished pine was the rage, big knots and all.
I remember rustic that was assembled with rusty nails and screws with strip ped heads, and defects were very highly prized. The fence guy I had at the time had folks stop by every job to see if they could buy his weathered ce dar.
I remember distressed finish furniture. You took a nice piece of furniture with good joinery, and then screwed it up by hitting it with metal junk, l aying screws, nails, wire and other crap in the surface and tapping it unti l it dented the wood. Indentions of screw threads were very highly prized. Then we wiped the damage with two different colors of stain to highlight t he damage before top coating.
No doubt in my mind that they exposed nails weren't meant to be any kind of statement of craftsmanship, but just another decorating fad.
Hope it goes away. Looking at that kind of thing is really annoying, even though I know the reason that kind of crap is made.
Robert
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On 5/16/2017 1:03 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And don't forget the Spanish style furniture with the rusted hardware that is so undersized that it would surely break if used regularly, not to mention the used motor oil stain. LOL
Kim and I went in to a new model home the other day, the kitchen cabinets were built with wood that had open defects, face frames, door frames and raised panels. Literally no part of a board was cut out for ascetics. Now I will say they were so heavily stained/painted that the defects were simply deep indentations with no change of color. Not as bad to look at as you might imagine.
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On Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 8:34:57 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Crap, I forgot all about that. We were at ground zero for that since so mu ch came up from Mexico. I actually had a guy that was on a job tell me how they got that look. They left the hinges outside in the weather, banged t hem up with hammers, and many were actually hand assembled from stamped pie ces, so they made sure they were poor fitting. The "finish" was pieces of roofing tar or asphalt dropped into gasoline and where it melted and then w as slathered on with a rag.

It sounds pretty awful. Rather than to look at that, I think I would rather have a good quality MDF product or a convention that is gaining steam in E urope. MDF carcasses, wood stiles and rails, and then super high density ( really stable) doors that are painted a contrasting color.
Robert
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On Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 11:01:34 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

much came up from Mexico. I actually had a guy that was on a job tell me h ow they got that look. They left the hinges outside in the weather, banged them up with hammers, and many were actually hand assembled from stamped p ieces, so they made sure they were poor fitting. The "finish" was pieces o f roofing tar or asphalt dropped into gasoline and where it melted and then was slathered on with a rag.

er have a good quality MDF product or a convention that is gaining steam in Europe. MDF carcasses, wood stiles and rails, and then super high density (really stable) doors that are painted a contrasting color.

Some of you guys are almost making me feel bad...LOL... about some of my pi eces and work, but I don't readily sell my pieces. Referencing details of my gun cabinet, with *nails and "distressed areas"- https://www.flickr.com /photos/43836144@N04/19333945635/in/photostream
It's made with old salvaged hand hewn boards, so there's lots of nail holes . Well, this (pic) is the "high-end" (the crown) https://www.flickr.com/p hotos/43836144@N04/34316203350/in/dateposted-public/ The curved (inside) center is kerf bent. Old boards, as this, don't steam bend, well, if at all.
From the above pic, scroll left for 1) A "lower end" (inside the upper cabi net), shows details of the shelf and bracing. And 2 & 3) The "lower end" ( lower cabinet top). I supposed the holes would gather dust, so I installe d old cut nails into these holes. These nails were pulled from old lumber and saved, for just this sort of decor application on this and future proj ects. Actually, on the gun cabinet, there were so many holes, it looked ba d. Filling the holes help the look, a lot, and the nails solution was bet ter than any dedicated filler.
*I'd guess at least 50% of craftsmen, here, slap together projects, for qui ck sale. There doesn't seem to be much desire, on their part, to improve t heir poor skills. *I'm not impressed with many of the pieces display at a recently opened (2 yrs ago) "Paul Michaels". They seem to market to the unknowing, yet wealt hy, clientele. *Shabby-chic painted furniture was the rage not long ago, but that seems to be on the down turn, these days. The furniture they paint are poor exampl es of good-to-quality pieces, also.
Sonny
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wrote:

Nice size but not nearly enough guns. ;-)

The shelf and bracing are pretty neat. Nice overall!
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