dado on front and back of cabinet drawer only

Hey everyone,
I'm working on a cabinet drawer for a spice cabinet box. I have planned on placing the sides on the inside of the front and back of the box and using pocket holes for the joinery. As I thought about it more, I have considere d using a dado joint to insert the bottom of the box (to help ensure it is inserted level), but only cutting out the groove on the front and back of t he box.
I'm sure there are questions abound (why aren't you dadoing the sides and f ront and back, why are you dadoing and pocket holing, why are the sides on the inside of the front and back and not on the outside) - but basically I want to know if there is any value (or any issue) with my intended set-up. I'm a novice - so learning more is always helpful. Thanks in advance!
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On Thursday, June 21, 2018 at 9:13:40 PM UTC-5, Robbie Brusso wrote:

n placing the sides on the inside of the front and back of the box and usin g pocket holes for the joinery. As I thought about it more, I have conside red using a dado joint to insert the bottom of the box (to help ensure it i s inserted level), but only cutting out the groove on the front and back of the box.

front and back, why are you dadoing and pocket holing, why are the sides o n the inside of the front and back and not on the outside) - but basically I want to know if there is any value (or any issue) with my intended set-up . I'm a novice - so learning more is always helpful. Thanks in advance!
One very good reason not to do what you are thinking about is the minor iss ue of your bottom getting a warp or bend and ceasing to fit properly, or (w orst case scenario) falling out.
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On 6/21/2018 10:16 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

...
While a lot of folks do so, it's not the best option or the traditional--which is to dado the front and sides and leave the back the width of the depth of the drawer. The drawer can then be assembled and the bottom inserted later.
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The downside on which is that the bottom sags at the back and stuff falls out behind the drawers where it's a pain in the butt to find.
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On 6/23/2018 10:12 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Well, no! :)
The back edge of the bottom is pinned (where's Norm's brad gun? :) ) which keeps it in place but is removable for repair if needed...with the advent of plywood instead of solid bottom stock isn't as big an issue, granted...
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That's the theory. I've had too many drawer bottoms sag at the back to ever be comfortable with that concept.
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On 6/23/2018 2:04 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

They're overloaded, then...the bottom needs to be sufficient to support the load in any drawer, no matter how it's constructed.
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They don't come with a capacity marked on them, so saying that they're "overloaded" when they're full of typical household oddments is a bit disingenuous.
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On 6/23/2018 4:43 PM, J. Clarke wrote: ...

If the bottom sags, they're overloaded! :)
Now, that they may have been underdesigned so they only will support a minimal amount of "stuff" far under the physical size is something else entirely and pretty much the norm for recent commercial cabinetry...
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Beat me to it!

The problem is that one of the fundamental laws of the universe is that "stuff" will accumulate to fit the space given. Weight isn't often of concern.
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On Saturday, June 23, 2018 at 10:52:03 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Well, eventually it is.
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On Sat, 23 Jun 2018 19:57:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Nah, it's the damned drawer's fault.
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On 6/23/2018 2:04 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

Then simply put in screws, pocket hole screws work well.
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On 6/25/18 6:00 PM, Leon wrote:

Or just dado all the sides/back at one time. I don't know why people in here constantly try to reinvent the wheel. Not only reinvent it, but go back in time and make wooden-spoke carriage wheels. :-)
It's so easy to dado the all the sides/back/front as one piece, then cut to leangth. Heck, they even sell them already slotted and pre-finished.... https://www.woodcraft.com/products/pre-cut-drawer-side-60-x-4-stock
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On Tuesday, June 26, 2018 at 12:42:10 AM UTC-4, -MIKE- wrote:

mbled

the

,
ack

Sometimes it's a matter of necessity/limitations. I have a very small shop. It's actually (sometimes) easier to dado 4 smaller pieces than 1 long one.
The OP mentioned using a router table. We don't know if it's a bench top, a standalone, or a table saw extension. If it's a bench top (possible since this a "early project" for the OP) small pieces are probably going to be easier to handle.
As skills and equipment progress, techniques will also.
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On 6/25/2018 11:42 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I cut grooves on all 4 sides on all of my drawers. Out of the 2~4 hundred drawers that I have built this way none have had to be repaired.
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On 6/23/18 10:12 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

I've seen drawers constructed that way and they usually have brads in that section to hold the drawer bottom tight against the back or some sort of metal bracket.
Most drawers like that use flimsy 1/8-3/16" hardboard for the bottoms and they sag in the middle of the drawer, anyway. Regardless of how far around the drawer the slots are cut, a thin bottom is a design flaw in my book.
I like the idea of being able to install the bottom before or after assembly. A properly build drawer has a bottom that is stiff enough to only need side support-- anything else is belt & suspenders.
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On 6/23/2018 12:21 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

+1
Drawers were built this way long preceding the invention of the various engineered materials; it's only the more recent advent and with the penchant of commercial cabinets in particular being design to be as cheap as possible to build and cover up the shortcomings with flash o the surface that became such a problem.
I virtually always still use solid bottom panels excepting for the most utilitarian and even then would never go under 1/4" ply for single-wide.
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On Saturday, June 23, 2018 at 10:12:08 AM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:

Yes, I don't know how far the dado is from the bottom? 1/8 or so? You could glue a thin support cleat, maybe. Just a thought.
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On 6/23/2018 10:12 AM, dpb wrote:

Tradition schmadition. Unless you are trying to exactly duplicate some antique piece you should use the best available method and material. I routinely use bottoms that are 1/2" thick solid material, beveled on the bottom surface, and fitted into 1/4" dadoes which are cut into all four sides of the drawer. Sure, I can't easily pop it out for repair, an acceptable thing in my mind, since a 1/2" solid bottoms aren't likely to sag or fail while a bottom tacked into place depends entirely on the fasteners which may pull out or split the stock. If a replacement was actually needed in the future then a simple cut across the bottom of the rear would allow the loose bottom to be slid out.
Oh, and I also use dovetails all the way round -- blind in the front and through at the rear.
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