Best entry level drill press

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Can you suggest a good entry level drill press. Ryobi, Delta ???????? or other
Regards Mark
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snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote:

how much you wanna spend? I've got a floor model Delta that suits me fine. 17-965. plenty of quill travel and adequate quality. much nicer of a DP than the Delta 14 BS.
dave
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Hey Dave, You and I have the same DP. I like my 965 also, good price, good quality (for a Chinese machine), and it just feels like a solid unit.                         Mark L.
Bay Area Dave wrote:

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Mark L. wrote:

glad you like yours too, Mark. It's one of only 3 pieces of Delta gear I have. Unisaw, sander, and the DP. Other Delta equipment has let me down. I won't mention exactly what, or you'll see 16 guys whining that I'm bringing up old news. :) Here's a hint: the tools rhymes with "grandpa".
dave
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I've heard you had a BS problem...... ;-)
Bay Area Dave wrote:

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yes, but I avoid mentioning it for fear of not getting into my flame retardant suit quickly enough to avoid the flames! :) My current BS is a Powermatic, which I really like a lot. (But I bet you already knew that, huh?)
dave
Mark L. wrote:

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Ummm, are you sure I meant BandSaw???? :-)
David wrote:

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On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 15:24:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote:

Why entry level? Afraid you're not going to use it much? Hah! The drill press may well be the most used tool in my shop. It probably will be in yours, too.
Get a 16" or 17" (or whatever dimension they're calling them these days) floor model drill press and you'll never want in that tool category again. Delta has changed their drill press (and other tool) model numbers, but the old 17-900 which was supplanted by the 17-965 is hard to beat at around the $300-400 price range.
I'm not a fan of Jet, but their drill press has been well reviewed by several posters here and on other fora.
Powermatic also makes one in the same range that probably would be good, too.
Don't discount General, either (or General International, their import line).
Almost anything you get is going to be a Chiwanese import, if that matters to you. You would probably be hard pressed (and cash poor afterward) to find an American made drill press.
Call me fickle, but I haven't found much of anything from Ryobi that I would care to have in my shop. Some other manufacturer's products aren't listed here for the same reason.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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LRod wrote:

ONE Ryobi piece that's ok IMO is the OSS. Bought one after Mike in Mystic told me how much he liked his. He was right. I've given up on other Ryobi tools. I have their ROS: POS. Replaced it with a PC and let the Ryobi gather dust.
dave
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Nope - I'd call you careful. That said - their OSS and the BE321 VS 3x21" Belt Sander have found a warm spot in my heart. The more I use both - the more I'm convinced they're in a nice weekend-warrior / value spot.
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On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 15:24:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote:

Drill presses are not high expensive items, so try to get the best you can afford. I have a floor model Delta and love it. One drawback is to change speeds you need to juggle a belt over two cone pulleys. A variable speed "dial" model is more money, however. You want one with very little run out.
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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As for the table height adjustment, excellent point. I learned the hard way with my entry-level DP that does not have it. I am now in DP time-out - making due for now.
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Refurb'd Delta 12" Benchtop from ToolKing. $125.
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A $50-$100 good used unit from your local want ads. I spent $100 on mine at an estate sale; big motor, 17 speed, 15" "benchtop" (at 100 lbs and 37" total height, calling it a benchtop is iffy). 20 year old Chinese import at that, and it's *still* good, little to no runout, etc (it was an industrial model, used strictly for metal drilling by prior owner).
thanks, --randy

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Newby here... what is "run-out" ???
Alex
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Movement of the chuck other than centered on the axis of rotation. If you've ever bent a bit slightly, or chucked it a touch off-center, you've noticed the tip makes little circles. If the DP quill / chuck combination has runout, the small circle is the _best_ you can hope for.
It says it was presented at a "symposium on hole technology," but in spite of that ominous-sounding intro: http://www.lionprecision.com/spindle/targaarticles.html

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wrote:

It has to do with precision. Lower cost machines with have lower tolerances. This may or not matter depending on the use of your drill press. Basically, you test for run out by chucking a piece of stiff wire (such as a coat hanger piece) and bending the wire so that it barely touches a large circle path on the table top. When the chuck is turned, the gap should be the same all the way around if there is no run-out. Personally, I'd shop for a high precision machine with the fewest gadgets to get a good value.
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Thu, Jul 8, 2004, 3:24pm snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wants to know: Can you suggest a good entry level drill press. Ryobi, Delta ???????? or other
I've read the other responses. My response is, it depends.
Depends on a number of things, as usual. How much you got to spend? What do you want to use iit for? Drilling holes in wood will never require the accuracy that some metal drilling will. Etc., etc., etc.
I've got a $50 Harbor Freight bench model drillpress that handles most of my drilling needs, in metal, or wood. The rest is taken care of with a B&D drill. Both are plenty accrate enough.
What I don't do, is use both every day, or to make a living with them. If I used them every day, I might, or might not, get something else. If I was concerned with making a living with them. I'd have heavier duty versions of both. As is, I doubt I'll replace my HF model.
JOAT What we see depends mainly on what we look for. - Sir John Lubbock
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snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca wrote in message

This is the one I have. I picked it up after Charley Self recomended it as a best buy a few years back http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G7944&gid^5B455D-A9B1-417A-A95C-B02C0831EACA&site=grizzly
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