band saw belts

anyone tried link belts on their band saw
keep hearing how much better link belts are for other applications but have not seen mention of using link belts on a bandsaw
probaably cost more but they are supposed to perform better than a solid belt
also the holes might help to prevent gunk build up under the belt
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yes
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On Tue, 6 Dec 2016 10:21:54 -0800, Electric Comet

I have link belts on my 14" Delta band saw, it is both a wood and metal bandsaw with a transmission, it requires two sets of belts.
Price that resarch you could do yourself.
I also have them on my Unisaw.
Yes I did edit your post it is so much more readable!
Mark
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On Tue, 06 Dec 2016 14:27:09 -0600

yours has 4 belts or more not sure what you mean
the common term that i did not use is tire so are you using link belts instead of tires or just link belts from the motor shaft pulley to the bandsaw wheel

gonna try them on the ts too i think
sort of a year end upgrade
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On 12/6/2016 1:21 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

No, why would I want one? None of my belts are link belts, and all my tools have been working great for 60 years. If your belts ain't working, your machine sucks, set up sucks, or imagination is wild. How could they improve on "working great"?
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Jack wrote:

Just a hunch (as I don't own one). They could get rid of any "memory" a typical belt could acquire.
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On 12/6/2016 6:19 PM, Bill wrote:

My guess is any "memory" would be erased after a few revolutions. Just a hunch, but most of the vibration is in the sales hype of the link belt marketing department.
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On 12/7/2016 12:40 PM, Jack wrote:

There are multiple quality type v-belts. Automotive tend to be the highest quality. Unfortunately tool manufacturers tend to not use them. I would have replaced my DP v-belts with automotive quality but the link belts were less expensive.
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On 12/7/2016 3:37 PM, Leon wrote:

Hmmm, didn't know link belts were less expensive. Seems stupid that tool manufacturers would use more expensive, inferior v belts on their expensive tools when they could be using cheap, but superior link belts. Makes the mind boggle...
I can see an advantage if you don't know what size belt you need, as I understand length is adjustable. Lots of moving parts on a link belt, right? I wonder if they are as durable? Most of my belts are 60 years old and still work like new.
If links are cheaper and work better, if I ever replace another belt, I'll look into the linked belt. As it stands, none of my equipment vibrates severely and far as I can tell, the belts are ready for another 60 of years of service.
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On 12/8/2016 9:53 AM, Jack wrote:

No, no, no, Automotive v-belts are not what you get with typical machinery. Typically industrial v-belts are cheap, automotive v-belts are typically 2~3 times more expensive but the quality is immediately visable. Industrial are designed to work on less than desirable applications. I was going to step up to either an automotive style or link belt.

Yes about every inch represents another part. It baffles me how these things work with less vibration. I have read that the vibration is absorbed by each break, at each link. And link belts do no take a set. I will add that my link belts are not necessarily quieter, quite the opposite but they do run much smoother.

Stick with what works. ;~) My old 1983 Craftsman contractors saw had an industrial v-belt on it when I sold it about 16 years later and it ran relatively smoothly.
Or take your old belt to an auto supply and ask for an automotive quality belt. Some automotive belts have notches cut out of the inner surface, perpendicular to the rotation of the belt, this allows the belt to bend around tighter radius pulleys.
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AKA "cog belt"
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On 12/8/2016 2:11 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Cog belts are typically timing belts that engage a gear type pulley. The notched I am talking look similar but are v-shaped and do not engage teeth on a pulley.
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On 12/8/2016 11:16 AM, Leon wrote:

This is news to me. Generally "industrial" means high quality, expensive, long lasting. I actually thought automotive fan belts were cheap. I don't have a lot of experience buying belts for my tools, so I'm certainly no expert. I bought a fan belt for my jointer once, because I replaced the cabinet it sat on and needed a different length belt. Had I known link belts were cheaper or even the same price, I would have gone with that mainly because the length is adjustable. It's a bit of a pain determining the correct length of a belt, and I'd assume link belts would be the ticket.

Perhaps old belts run smoother than new belts? If my belts are anything, they are old. On the other hand, I don't get how a belt weighing a few ounces would make a 300-1000lb machine vibrate severely?

I've seen those type of belts, but don't have any. Belt wise, I've been happy with what has been working forever. If I ever need to replace one, I just might go with a link belt. I see Harbor Freight has a 5' one for $26. I guess I could get two 2 1/2' belts out of that. I'm still thinking an automotive fan belt would be cheaper, but not sure.
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On 12/9/2016 8:26 AM, Jack wrote:

Yeah I can see that. I retired from the automotive world and sold thousands of belts. With dealerships we only carried top quality automotive style belts. When I was very young I worked for an auto supply store that carried automotive and industrial belts. A customer brought a belt in that he wanted to match in size. It just so happened the only fit was an industrial belt and I later learned that he put it on a vehicle, the belt lasted about 3 weeks. Had he told me what it was going on I would not have sold him a belt at all, we did not have an automotive quality belt in stock.
I actually thought automotive fan belts were

Pricing is relative. With the dealerships back in the 80's Dayco belts cost the dealer $14~$20. I suspect if you buy an industrial belt at a industrial supply or like company the belt will also be expensive. Industrial at the auto supply were about half the price of the automotive. One of my vendors sold automotive lamps for cars and he owned an airplane. When he bought air plane lamps from an aviation supply the cost was 3~4 times the cost of what he sold the same lamp to automobile dealerships.

Think about how a 1 oz. wheel weight in the wrong place on a wheel makes the whole car shake. Industrial belts are not as precision made and or come in a variety of qualities, as automotive, they often have high spots and wide spots. Automotive belts are pretty uniform in shape

That is where I got my link belt and at the time it was a name brand belt. That was surprising, you could buy the same brand at a number of other places which is not the norm for Harbor Freight. Any way the single belt was long enough to replace the two belts on my DP.
Keep in mind that link belts do stretch quite a bit after a bit of use, I ended up having to remove a link after some use.
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On 12/9/2016 12:11 PM, Leon wrote:

Good point. On the other hand, I'm thinking about how a grossly out of balance fly cutter on my drill press does not make my DP vibrate severely. Also thinking about off centered turnings on my lathe. It takes a whole lot to get it vibrating severely or at all, far more than a lowly v-belt could possibly deliver. I'm thinking a wheel on a car is attached to springs that allow movement, unlike a stationary tool that is designed not to move so much. At any rate a fly cutter is grossly out of balance vs a v-belt, or a 1 oz tire weight. Does your drill press severely vibrate with a fly cutter?
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On 12/10/2016 10:03 AM, Jack wrote:

The farther the heavier spot is from the center of rotation the more the vibration will be amplified.
Springs on a vehicle are to absorb bumps, struts/shock absorbers prevent over oscillation of the springs.
BUT if you have ever seen a vehicle going down the highway/freeway and the tire is bouncing on a smooth surface that is typically an out of balance wheel/tire along with a worn out strut/shock absorber.
AND a little known fact, most tires are checked for balanced at the factory before they are mounted on wheels. If you look at a quality brand new tire that has never been mounted there is almost always a small wax spot, typically red or white, stuck on the tire near the bead on the out side surface. That dot is the lite location on the tire. It is to be placed adjacent to the valve stem, the heavier spot on the wheel. ;~)
I have not used a fly cutter at all. But concerning that if you upped the rpm on the fly cutter the vibration would be more noticeable.
But virtually all vibration disappeared when I replaced the two factory belts with the link belts. And I might add that the vibration was not much noticeable on the lower half of the speed range with the factory belts.
AND the link belts are intended to be used in a single direction so I'm mot sure how that works on lathes with a reverse feature.
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On 12/10/2016 2:49 PM, Leon wrote:

Absolutely.

Maybe that's it, I run my drill press at medium speed 99% of the time. I slow it down only for the fly cutter as it seems unsafe at higher speeds and I think I could set wood on fire at high speeds. Fly cutters turn my safest tool into the most dangerous, imo.
I'm not sure I would trust my self with a variable speed at the touch of a button DP like the NOVA. Yes, I once started my DP with the key in the chuck... I also started my lathe with the key in the chuck, I think I did that 2x, which is incredibly stupid. The lathe I attributed to old age stupidness. The drill press I was young and in a hurry.

Good to know. The only belted tool I have that goes in reverse is my shaper. If any tool vibrates it would be that one as it turns at high speed. My lathe doesn't vibrate enough to notice even when turning an off centered piece. The belt on my lathe is loose as well, so it will slip if I jam something up. Not sure what impact a linked belt would have on that?
I've done the nickle test on my table saw once because people here (you) mentioned it, and it passed, which I thought it would. I think all my tools would pass once up to speed. Start up I'd expect would drop the nickle on most of my tools, but that's not a belt vibration issue.
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On 12/11/2016 9:33 AM, Jack wrote:

I am certain the lower speeds hide a lot of potential for vibration. If nothing else fly cutters have an added element of danger because of the asymmetrical shape, easy to get your fingers in the way.

Well that would certainly be something to consider but like most new tools/equipment there is a "getting to know you" period. You probably would only make that mistake one time. ;~)
Yes, I once started my DP with the key in

Well I don't think stupid or old for either, just a normal human. We don't learn everything by reading the cautionary lables, sometimes experience from the school of hard knocks is a frequent teacher. The safety check list is just too long to put into print. Now if you continue to make the mistake, that would be a different matter. LOL

I certainly would not switch belts for the sake of doing so, only to eliminate a vibration introduced by a belt.

I was tickled, for the entertainment value, of doing the "quarter" test on my TS. It passed during start up too. IIRC it took me longer to balance the quarter than to conduct the test. LOL and 700lbs of mass does not hurt. FWIW my saw has two automotive style serpentine belts, a belt for the motor to a middle double pulley and another from that pulley to the arbor pulley. I'm certain that the two vs. a single long belt help to keep the vibration down.
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No, in general "industrial" is lower on the totem pole than "automotive", with the latter being somewhat less than "military". Automotive specs are, in general, much more rigorous than industrial.

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On 12/9/2016 8:10 PM, krw wrote:

That's news to me. To me, industrial describes something designed to last a long time in continuous duty, IE; high strength, superior build lots more money. The term is used often in advertising such as "industrial strength" cleaner, so it means that to more than just me, probably about everyone or the ad men would be using "automotive strength" cleaner instead.
Automotive strength is a term I never heard uttered. Probably because most people think auto's are designed to fail routinely, specifically shortly after the 3 year warranty expires, you can expect frequent failures until replacement.
Military strength is synonymous with industrial strength, but cost 10 times more than industrial strength, and 20-200 times more than non-industrial strength.
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