Why street lights on all night?



can I clarify? The point I am making is that most people think they can see to stop on the motorway at night when in fact the reason they dont crash is the low likelihood of there being anything to hit. When at the front of a group of traffic at night on dipped at 70+, they think they are driving on eyesight observation, they are actually driving on the gamble motorways are usually clear.
--
all thumbs

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clumsy bastard wrote:

And my point is that his is in fact the case with all driving anyway, night or day.
All you can do is play the percentages intelligently. I don't drive in very heavy wind,because about a person a year dies when a branch falls in front of them.
I don't speed in towns because the chances of something appearing suddenly are large.
I slow down where there are woods against the roads here, because its crawling with deer, and one or two people a year write cars off against them.
I leave 3 times the gap on the M25 that anyone else does, because there is nowhere to run and you need all the time you can get if the (quite likely) accident occurs.
But I am perfectly happy doing 130mh down an unlit autobahn in the middle of the night, because there is virtually zero probability there will be anything on it.
And, if I have to dip my lights, there is virtually zero chance hat the bit of road for the next mile that I could clearly see before I dipped them, has suddenly acquired an unlit sherman tank, and of course, even that won't fill the WHOLE road.
Oh, and most people will survive a high speed accident as long as they don't hit something very large, heavy and immovable.
30mph is only fatal to pedestrians these days: I came upon the result of a 120mph accident. Even the guys in the back who weren't wearing seat belts survived. Cut to shit by glass, and a couple of broken bones..but they made it, I heard from the police later.
OTOH the woman who drive off the road - probably at 40-50mph.. and vanished for 6 months, till someone spotted her Volvo at the bottom of a lake, didn't.
If you are going to have an accident, and one day it probably happens to everyone, try and pick a soft target to have it against..
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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Surely you don't avoid all activities that kill one or more people per year?
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no, normally we drive to be able to stop in half the distance we can see + allowance for the child behind car etc

One a year? I wouldn't worry about that.

yep.
or anywhere where something can leap out

or any motorway compared with the next to nothing many leave.

there is no "before you dipped them" in my scenario, who gets a chance to use main beam on our motorways?
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clumsy bastard wrote:

you obviopusly do not drive at 2a.m.-4a.m...
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I do, but my scenario was the more normal situation of drivers forced onto permanent dipped at 70+ and they cant see to stop and rely on chance.
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On Thu, 08 Jan 2009 10:47:43 +0000, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

That one seems not worth worrying about, statistically. Of course caution can be applied appropriately if driving in heavy wind...

Yep.
I think there's estimated to be one deer for every five people in this state - you quickly learn not to collect any on the front of your vehicle (and I've seen them come barelling out of the trees and straight over 4' high fences into the road many a time)
After dark you get used to looking out for the reflections in their eyes :-)

I think a lot of people miss that. Always devote part of your concentration to knowing where to ditch if the completely unexpected does happen. It's all about managing risk; anyone who thinks that 100% safe driving is possible is clearly nuts.
cheers
J.
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wrote:

If your dipped lights illuminate 400 yards away I suggest you get them adjusted.
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On Wed, 07 Jan 2009 19:00:36 +0000, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Operative word "bright" and it relies on the road being straight so the object is in the (dipped) beam.

Deer, cows, horses generally aren't (eyes excepted), tend to be dark in colour and move unpredictably, suddenly and fast.
A rabbit leapt out(*) in front of me a while back I was doing about 55mph it took out (apart from itself) the radiator grill, wind deflector, knocked the headlamp of its mountings and broke one of them. That was only a rabbit anything as large as the above is going to do serious damage to the car and probably you as well.
(*) I mean leapt as well the above damage was on a Discovery so 2 to 3' above the ground.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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Ever been hit by a pheasant ?
that can be a tad disconcerting
... but tasty
--
geoff

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On Sun, 11 Jan 2009 01:35:19 +0000, geoff wrote:

Yes at least twice, fortunately not had one come through the windscreen yet. Last one hit the top nearside corner and emptied it bowels down the near side.

If you eat that sort of thing. B-)
--
Cheers
Dave.




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absolutely
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geoff

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Dave Liquorice wrote:

God, lost count of how many of the things I have hit. Partridge and pigeons too..and bunnies.
One phaasant hit with a hell of a thump and I thought 'dinner' and stopped ..but couldnt find it.
I did 3 weeks later when I washed the car. Rammed into the radiator grille.
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Mainly because it is both cheaper and more reliable that way, although there are also safety considerations on major roads too. Dusk to dawn lighting simply needs a very reliable and cheap photocell controller in each light unit. The light columns can be connected directly to the nearest mains and if one controller does fail only one light goes out. Timed lighting requires a separate supply to the street lamps, running back to a central control unit. If that fails, or gets out of step with the correct time, a whole bank of lights are affected. Timers also need regular servicing, which adds considerably to the cost. There were some experiments with individual timers in each column, but that turned out to be a logistical nightmare.
Colin Bignell
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nightjar <cpb@ wrote:

In these days of radio-controlled alarm clocks for a fiver (or less), is having the correct time such a problem?
And what servicing does a timer need? Assuming a nice simple thing like a central heating control. No moving parts. Nothing to go wrong except, maybe, a replaceable rechargeable cell for backup.
--
Rod

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...

I rather doubt that a commercial quality timer, capable of switching gas discharge lamps, would be anything like that cheap. I also don't think the quality of radio singal inside a steel lamp column would be that good, while an external aerial would result in complications of installation and extra cost.
However, assuming that the cost, including fitting, was only 5 more than the existing system, that would add nearly 3million to the capital cost of street lights in my County. I don't know the current tariffs, but street lights always used to get very favourable rates, because they operated mostly through the late night and early morning periods, when any load on the system was welcome. If they changed to evening only, I would expect a higher tariff, which would reduce any savings achieved.
Colin Bignell
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nightjar <cpb@ wrote:

I was rather assuming that the timer mechanism itself simply had to provide a low voltage on/off signal, maybe to switch using a relay? Obviously the fundamental ability to switch on/off gas discharge lamps must already be built in. Surely the timer does not have to be closely coupled to the switch? But I do accept that the cost might be a bit more than that of the high street versions.
Of course the metal column isn't an ideal environment for radio reception (though I have had a number of mobile conversations inside metal lifts). But, designed in from the start, the obvious place to consider for an aerial is up in the glass part.
I had in my mind the sophisticated timers I have seen in lamp posts in the past. They certainly looked like precision mechanisms and would undoubtedly have been quite expensive. I would guess that making non-mechanical device would by now be less expensive.
Your favourable rates part is a good point.
--
Rod

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On 8 Jan,

I'm sure I read somehere of a (possibly Chinese) manufacturer of lamp posts fitting them with GPS receivers to control their on/off times. If they knew where they were installed, they could work the times of dusk/dawn out easily.
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B Thumbs
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Makes sense - up to the point that any timer does! And especially useful on self-propelled street lights that might end up in a different place every day.
I was imagining either the (former) Rugby time signal, one of the cellular networks, Radio 4 long wave (a la Economy 7 switches) or similar.
--
Rod

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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

How could a lamp post with a GPS receiver *not* know where it was installed? That's half the point of it!
Andy
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