vacuum filling ink cartridges



Worth a try at 5.99/set compared to 40 or so for Epsom genuine!
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On 26/12/2012 21:11, ss wrote:

Some Youtube videos suggest that the syringe is used as the vacuum device. Insert ink into cartridge one one side, turn it over so the filling side (bunged up) is at the bottom and the syringe used to draw off the air (lock) pocket.
Other methods suggest that the ink input is a tube connected to the replacement bottle and the method of filling is to use the syringe to pull the ink through - and at the same time removing the air.
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Wouldn't it work if you injected the ink first, bunged up the filling holes, and then put the cart in the bag and evacuated it so as to prime the cartridge by drawing ink through the print head?
Spinning the cartridge in a centrifuge with the head facing outwards should work. I've managed to prime ink cartridges by tying them on a plastic bag in a suitable orientation and swinging it round above my head.
Messy things.
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On 27/12/2012 01:37, Graham. wrote:

The carts that came with the printer caused all sorts of issues when refilled and thats when I discovered they require a vacuum fill. seemingly the air at the bottom of the cart limits the ink flow. I could ony get around 30 pages and the ink stopped flowing. I did try several cleans and primes to no avail, I now have replacements but they will need filling shortly.
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On 27/12/2012 08:34, ss wrote:

I may try something like this, worth a bash.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tNmORhMqow&list=HL1356601978&feature=mh_lolz

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all with:

I think you would get more negative air pressure by sucking air out of the cartridge with a syringe than using a big plastic bag and a 'vacuum' cleaner.
I think you only need to reduce the air pressure in the big plastic bags by a very small amount for them to be compressed by atmospheric pressure - you are probably mainly removing excess air rather than creating much of a vacuum.
Perhaps you might be better off with a small vacuum pump and a bell jar or demijohn where you can route your tubing through the stopper and keep a small reduction in air pressure inside the jar which should be all you need to remove air from the cartridge.
Mind you it is a long time since I did 'A' Level Physics when they gave you this kind of toy to play with :-)
I am wondering, though, why they need a vacuum fill?
Presumably previous cartridges had some kind of two way breather so that air could be vented when ink was added under pressure, and air could enter as the ink was used up.
Speculating wildly, this might encourage evaporation and the cartridge drying up. So they may have introduced some kind of valve or membrane to prevent this.
I still wonder why a vacuum, though.
If the internal pressure of the ink is higher than the outside air pressure then air should flow out of the cartridge. Reducing the external air pressure may speed this process but ink should still flow in and air should still flow out as long as there is ink pressure from the syringe.
Cheers
Dave R
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On 27/12/2012 11:53, David WE Roberts wrote:

Without the vacuum there can be a layer of air just above the printhead that causes the ink to stop flowing,apparently it acts like a dam, if vacuum filled then this air doesnt exist within the `sponge`and the ink flows freely.
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On Wednesday, December 26, 2012 9:11:03 PM UTC, ss wrote:

A Vac-u-vin stopper, or a Vac-u-vin coffee jar, will go down to about 1/4 atmosphere, which is enough for most "mechanics" processes where you're looking to generate a pressure differential. Handy for degassing epoxy or silicone resins.
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On 28/12/2012 01:33, Andy Dingley wrote:

atmosphere, which is enough for most "mechanics" processes where you're looking to generate a pressure differential. Handy for degassing epoxy or silicone resins.
That sounds like a good option for trying.
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