update - new install / boiler quickie thread



Got the quote back...
2100 for a Worcester Bosch 28Si2 2700 for a Worcester Bosch 30HE
Not sure I can justify an extra 600 bearing in mind the level of savings, 0.5 lpm hike in DHW flow, and the potential lifespan of the install / time before moving house (if it ever happens...)
Thoughts ?
-- Please add "[newsgroup]" in the subject of any personal replies via email * old email address "btiruseless" abandoned due to worm-generated spam * --- My new email address has "ngspamtrap" & @btinternet.com in it ;-) ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The difference in the list price of the boilers is about 250 + Vat. (If I have correctly identified the boilers in the Plumb Center 'Trade Price' catalogue. Where is the extra money going? Provision of condensate drain?
The government wants to make all new boilers condensing, see:
http://www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odpm_buildreg/documents/page/odpm_breg_024792-04.hcsp http://www2.dti.gov.uk/energy/whitepaper/chap3.pdf
Michael Chare
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 4 Mar 2004 01:00:43 +0000 (UTC), "Michael Chare"

A number of factors:
- more care with corrosion prevention - e.g. stainless steel heat exchanger (although I believe that the WB ones are a different alloy)
- condensate drain
- smaller production volume
- development cost recovery
- the market will stand a higher price
At the point when legislation dictates minimum efficiencies of 86%, older products largely disappear. Manufacturers might as well milk that cash cow for as long as they can and keep condensing boiler prices higher.
When the old ones do go, then production volumes increase and costs decrease on condensing models. the manufacturers can be heroes by making a small price reduction and the rest of what will appear to be a price hike in the general market will be blamed on the government as a stealth tax.

.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I noticed a similar difference at discountedheating

That may, depending on how it was done, be a potential problem - I have no conventional soil stack (the soil pipe is concreted into the floor of a ground floor extension), and the only way I could see them being able to route it would be...
1) via external wall down a shared passageway to the drain about 18 foot away (with associated freezing problems) 2) into guttering that collects the water off a flat-roofed extension (not sure on the rules for this, whether it would be allowed - it all runs to the same foul water drain) 3) run internally and connected via a connector to the existing toilet - this wouldn`t necessarily a hard run to do, considering the DHW would have to take exactly the same route.

I know - the wife just wants heat, but i`m sceptical about the hike in cost vs payback over the typical lifespan of a CH system (or cost relative to moving house well before any savings take the difference into account)
-- Please add "[newsgroup]" in the subject of any personal replies via email * old email address "btiruseless" abandoned due to worm-generated spam * --- My new email address has "ngspamtrap" & @btinternet.com in it ;-) ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not a good plan - too long unless you run it in waste pipe with a good slope.

I don't know of anything specific but not a good practice I think.

That would be reasonable. A separate trap for it would be a good idea between boiler and waste.

Over the lifetime of a CH system, assuming you look after the CH system and don't shorten its life by not filling with inhibitor, you should get the incremental payback easily.
If your horizon is two years, possibly not.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IIRC, it is explicitly allowed by the instructions. Mine takes this route. Any other route would actually be more likely to freeze, as the pipe would be run externally for a much longer run. Obviously, the recommended route is an internal drain, but this is sometimes just not possible.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.