Unreliability of upright vacuum cleaners



Have you thought of oiling it? Clearly the motor is getting overheated because of a dry bearing somewhere, either in the motor itself or the brush bar.
[snip]

The cut out isn't the problem, it's only doing its job. Oiling may only be a temporary cure if a bearing is shot somewhere but it's certainly worth a go.
Tim
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Tim Downie wrote:

The other possibility is there is a blockage somewhere and the motor is not getting the flow of cooling air it requires. Many of them depend on a decent air flow to cool the motor - without it the things get hot, bearings can seize etc.
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Thu, 02 Apr 2009 12:54:18 +0100, MM wrote:

I always seemed* to end up completely stripping them down and cleaning them out at least once a year, along with checking the motor brushes. No matter what the design, dirt always seemed to find its way to the motor and then everything starts overheating.
* we're mostly on hardwood floors now, which makes life a lot easier!
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On Thu, 02 Apr 2009 12:54:18 +0100, MM wrote:

That's the thrmal cutout, doing its job. Which means the motor's overheating.

Bearings drying out.
Are you keeping the air filters clean? Most modern vacs have one or two foam filters and a hepa filter. The foam filters need rinsing and drying out every three or four weeks. The hepa needs replacing every 6 months.
Just recently replaced an elderly upright with a modern Electrolux. Truly astonishing just how much dust and fluff it picks up each week - we blame it on the cats! But....
If the foam filters get clogged up the airflow through the machine drops dramatically and the suction falls off quite markedly.
--
The Wanderer

Everyone brings happiness.
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I believe some (or most?) vacuum cleaners direct the filtered air through the motor for cooling (on Dyson a further filter removes any carbon residue from the brushes). So a blocked cleaner will lead to overheating very quickly. I know someone who seems to have problems with cleaners - when I look at them they are on their last legs - clogged through sucking up soggy food dropped by the kids
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Did you contact Panasonic? Most would expect an expensive vacuum to last much longer than this - unless it was a Dyson, of course. They tend to be fashion items and changed often to stay in fashion.
I have an MC-E452 which is somewhat over 10 years old, and despite having a long haired dog and a cleaning lady who loves Dyson and does her best to break it, refuses to die. It's only had the usual wearing parts replaced - although I gave up on the light after the second bulb failed in short order.
--
*Snowmen fall from Heaven unassembled*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thu, 02 Apr 2009 17:52:43 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

No. I thought at the time that as it was out of warranty by then they wouldn't want to know.

It wasn't all ~that~ expensive. Cost me around 79 in a local department store.

Last longer than a couple of years, certainly I would have expected that. I also have a 25-year-old Electrolux cylinder model (which was my only cleaner till I bought the Panasonic upright). The Electrolux is still working and has only been serviced once. When the Hoover packed up the other day I had to finish vacuuming with the Electrolux, but it was a PITA after the ease with which one can push an upright around. I still keep the Electrolux for doing out the car, though. (However, someone said in this thread that Electrolux was a rubbish brand, too. But mine, being a 25-year-old design, is probably still from the era when goods were made to last. E.g. my Sony portable TV is now 17 years old.)

I checked earlier and found the motor was listed as a replacement part. 59 quid!! I could buy a new upright for that!!
MM
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Quick calculation... My Hitachi 14" portable TV is now 26 years old. It will be chucked out when analogue signal is switched off though, if it's still going at that point. (It was 250 when I bought it;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel
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On 02 Apr 2009 21:36:29 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

I'm going to see whether I can get by with a set-top box. Down to 14 quid in ASDA now.
MM
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If it was just a matter of a set-top box, I'd consider it. But it's the two remotes, and lack of integration which blows it for me. 26 year old set has no SCART, so there would be no automatic switching that way. If someone made a set-top box, which could be programmed to relay different infrared commands through to the TV, for 20 which is already more than the TV is worth, I'd consider it. The TV is too old to recognise most of the preprogrammed Hitachi codes that third party remotes have nowadays, so the set top box would need to learn directly from the Hitachi's remote.
--
Andrew Gabriel
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Set top boxes I've had take care of channel + volume as well as all the obvious digital thing, so no need for the TV remote. Leave TV on one channel, tuned to the RF output of the STB, the end.
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This message is in MIME format. The first part should be readable text, while the remaining parts are likely unreadable without MIME-aware tools.
---559023410-1483920592-1238764075=:8425 Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: QUOTED-PRINTABLE
On Fri, 3 Apr 2009, Clive George wrote:

Yes, all you need is to make sure that the set-top box outputs to RF (to avoid the added expense of an RF modulator).
Kostas ---559023410-1483920592-1238764075=:8425--
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On Fri, 03 Apr 2009 13:31:32 +0100, Clive George wrote:

Yeah, that's our setup too, although the STB's remote does know enough to turn the TV on and off (rather than relying on it waking up when there's a signal and going into standby when there isn't).
We've got one STB sitting in the office (so not really ST at all :) which feeds two TVs via co-ax, then on the back of the TV where the co-ax plugs in is a little (unpowered) module with a rabbit ear antenna. I assume what happens is that the STB remotes also send out an RF signal which is picked up via the closest module - communication than happens back down the co-ax to the STB so that it can switch that particular line to the requested channel.
First time I've ever had any kind of digital TV setup, so maybe they're pretty much all like that these days - but it's nice that I don't need one STB per TV, and nice that the STB remote doesn't need to control the TV (other than hard power control, but if needed then physically hitting the power switch on the front of the set isn't exactly a hardship :-)
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FreeView is mainly 16:9 aspect ratio so a 4:3 set is not going to show the correct picture, unless it has a 16:9 setting - unlikely with one that old.
--
*When did my wild oats turn to prunes and all bran?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Get yourself a Miele vacuum cleaner; by far the best vacuum cleaner we have ever used.
We had a Dyson for 8 years and a Vax for 2 years, now both have been replaced with Miele vacuums, one of them is a cylinder and one is the new S7 upright.
Both are quiet, have excellent filtration which the Dyson did not have, hygienic dustbag change and very powerful.
There are so many good things I can say about the vacuum.
Everything about it is so well though out.
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David wrote:

Maybe you could add your thoughts here: http://www.wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=Vacuum_Cleaner_Review If any problm posting, you can always reply on ukdiy for it to be included.
NT
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David;2929567 Wrote: > On 2 Apr, 12:54, MM <kylix....uk> wrote: > > Since moving into my new house five years ago I have bought not one, > > but TWO upright vacuum cleaners. > > > > The first was a Panasonic MCE468. It lasted about two years, then > > simply stopped working. I reckoned the price to repair it was > probably > > more than a new machine, so in July 2007 I bought a > > factory-refurbished Hoover PurePower 1900W. The local shop that sold > > it to me said that these machines (they are always replenishing their > > stock of factory "seconds") are refurbished by Hoover, then sold at > > roughly half price. So I paid 34 for mine and it looked brand-new. > No > > trace of dust in the bag cavity, for example. It came with a > six-month > > warranty. > > > > Huzzah, I thought. A virtually new Hoover for 34 can't be bad. And > it > > was fine. It sucked up the dust brilliantly. Until a couple of weeks > > ago. > > > > It began to cut out. I thought the same thing had happened as > happened > > to the Panasonic. Dead for ever more. But no. After ten minutes or so > > I switched it on and lo and behold it worked again! > > > > Over the past few days, however, it is cutting out so frequently that > > it has become unusable. Also, it now makes such an awful screaming > > noise I have to wear ear defenders like roadmenders with a pneumatic > > drill. > > > > So I have two choices: Get it repaired or buy a THIRD upright! > > > > If I choose the latter, I've just checked the Argos catalogue and the > > choice is overwhelming. So what would you recommend? > > > > I can't afford to spend a fortune, so a Dyson is out of the question. > > The catalogue starts with an Argos own brand at 38.99 and ranges > > through a Panasonic (spit) at 59.99, an Electrolux also at 59.99, a > > VAX bagless at 63.59 to a VAX bagless at 73.39. But there are > dozens > > of others. > > > > Alternatively, I could replace the motor myself if spares are > > available. Are they? > > > > I took the Panasonic to pieces and checked every connection to the > > motor, right up to the brushes. Juice is there, but the motor simply > > won't run. I was told by somebody that these things have a thermal > > overload device that causes them to cut out, but where would it be on > > the Panasonic? What does such a thermal overload/cutout device look > > like? > > > > Thanks! > > > > MM > > Get yourself a Miele vacuum cleaner; by far the best vacuum cleaner we > have ever used. > > We had a Dyson for 8 years and a Vax for 2 years, now both have been > replaced with Miele vacuums, one of them is a cylinder and one is the > new S7 upright. > > Both are quiet, have excellent filtration which the Dyson did not > have, hygienic dustbag change and very powerful. > > There are so many good things I can say about the vacuum. > > Everything about it is so well though out. Dysons rock! But if you let the carpet people know you have one it will void your warranty.
--
Dymphna
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MM wrote: <SNIP>

Put it down - move away from the Argos catalouge!

Thank heavens - poor performance, unreliable. Known in the trade as Die Soon.

And they will all die within a few years.
THE best upright vacuum on the face of the planet is the Sebo BS36 http://www.sebo.co.uk/Pages/bs4636.html - full spec commercial machine, will run rings around a Die Soon
Might cost a few hundred, but it will prolly outlast you.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman
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i was waiting for the dyson haters to start posting :)
horses for courses i guess,
my mum bought one of the first DC01's, when she got a DC07 'because it was better than the 01' the 01 got religated to the garage, where it's lived for the past 7 years being used to hoover the concrete floor of shavings, dust, muck, screws and nails, and being connected to the tools with suction points including a router table and chop saw.
when mum got a DC14, and i moved into my own place, i got her DC07, still works perfectly, we have a very hairy dog and right now is her moult season, so it's getting used a lot on a combo of carpets, wood and tile floors,
we spent today cleaning the car to sell, i haddnt hoovered it for about 5 years and the rear was half an inch thick in dog hairs, i got the shop vacuum out as i figured it would have the most suction being a 2.5kw motor, damn thing hardly lifted the dog hairs,
so i got the dyson out to hoover the mats laid on the floor in upright mode, and just tried the wand on the seats, damn thing got almost all the dog hairs off the seats, had to empty the dust chamber 5 times it pulled so much crap out of the carpets and back seat.
the one thing i do with all the dysons tho is to take them appart once a year, and use compressed air to really blow the passages and cyclone bits out, the 07 is great for that, as everything just unclips, when i get a clog i just need to release a clip to take the section of tubing on the body out to pull it clear, of course that means lots of seals where the tubes would be one piece on other vacuums, but under suction they compress and seal tightly.
if my dyson died tommorow, i'd either fix it or buy a new one,
The only place i don't use the dyson is in the motorhome, but that is because i fitted a centeral vacuum system to it years ago, only a small system with 2 suction points (mot inspectors always ask what the large bore pipes with 2 core wire clipped to them, running from each end of the van cris crossing the chassis to meet at one location are. they never believe i have a centeral vacuum system, so i have to show them it working)
A 3 meter hose allows me to reach from end to end using the 2 suction points, turbo brush does a fairly decent job of getting dog hairs out, but it gets clogges from hairs wrapping around the drive quite often, tho to be honnest i rekon they are my GF's hairs that do that, bit too long to be the dogs i rekon,
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On Thu, 02 Apr 2009 18:41:28 GMT, "The Medway Handyman"

I've checked the prices. Can't afford that kind of thing. Far too expensive. Ludicrously expensive, actually, now I come to think of it. We are talking: a motor, flexible hose, a dust collection system, a beater bar. Big deal. Okay, so the production quality is good, fair enough. Let's say, it's worth therefore three times the cost of the cheaper models, so around 150 tops. But a price comparison website lists the Sebo BS36 at up to 303 !!!
MM
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