Trimming doors to fit new carpets

We're having some new carpets and vinolay fitted, and the carpet shop says their fitters don't remove or cut doors. The doors are also new, so there's a real possibility that some at least will need trimming across the bottom. While it's within my capabilities and should be fairly straightforward, I've not done it before, so any tips, do's and don't's would be welcome.
--

Chris

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Remove the door, and support above the ground horizontally. Clamp a batten to use as a guide for a circular saw with nice decent sharp blade. That IMHO is the easiest way to get a nice clean edge with minimal skills. Unlike planing. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 30/03/2018 13:28, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

+1
Planing was the traditional way in the days before the common availability of portable circular saws. Since it was the only easy way to take a few mm off the bottom of a door. However it does require some skill, and planing in from both sides so you don't plane off the edge of the jam and split the edge off.
A (small block) plane is still handy once you have cut it with a circular saw though - go round and stick a bevel on all the new sharp corners you have left - makes it less likely to catch on the carpet and stops the edge getting damaged as easily.
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John.
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Sandpaper on a block? ;-)
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*It's this dirty because I washed it with your wife's knickers*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 30/03/2018 15:19, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yup, that works. Although I find breaking edges with a small plane is somehow quite satisfying ;-)
--
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John.
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On 30/03/2018 15:44, John Rumm wrote:

I hardly ever use a plane these days. My late father in law (who was a wonderful carpenter) used to sharpen them for me, but I can't manage anything like the edge. And yes, I've read all the articles and have all the kit. I just don't have the touch. Yet I can reliably get dimensions to one or two tenths with an ordinary micrometer.
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On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 13:28:17 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

Music to my ears! I don't have a circular saw, but do have an old but still serviceable Black & Decker jig saw, which if used steadily without pushing it too hard, does a half-decent job. Thanks.
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Chris

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A jigsaw used carefully may be OK on one side, but likely not on the other side of something this thick. Even a cheap circular saw will make a better job - and well worth it considering what doors cost.
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*America is so advanced that even the chairs are electric.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 30/03/2018 14:15, Chris Hogg wrote:

Unless your jigsaw blades are a lot more rigid than my Bosch ones the thickness of a door will cause the blade to wander all over the place making the bottom of the cut very wavy. Mike
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On 01/04/2018 10:46, Muddymike wrote:

A good quality jigsaw with a bit of pendulum action on can usually cut a door fairly straight IME - so long as you don't try to force a cut line along a batten. Oddly enough the egg box doors can be much harder to cut with a jigsaw than solid ones.
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John.
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On 30/03/2018 13:28, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

+1
Do you know how much you need to take off? Hollow internal doors have relatively thin framing at the bottom and, if you take too much off, the frame can disappear altogether. That's happened to me a few times! You then have to make up a new piece of framing of exactly the right thickness to fit between the outer skins, and glue it in place.
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Roger
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On Friday, March 30, 2018 at 10:17:11 PM UTC+1, Roger Mills wrote:

... and if you cut it will a saw rather than a plane you will have exactly the right bit of framing wood left inside the piece you just cut off (just peel off the hardboard strips.
R
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On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 13:28:17 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

I always find the screws are painted in, in an older property.
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On Mon, 02 Apr 2018 10:10:17 +0100

Clean the slots out well and use the /big/ screwdriver.
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I find an impact driver works well where screws have been painted over.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Mon, 02 Apr 2018 14:19:07 +0100, "Dave Plowman (News)"

Dig out the paint from the slots with a pointy thing; insert screwdriver and give it a whack with a hammer before twisting, to make sure it's well seated.
--

Chris

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On 02/04/2018 14:39, Chris Hogg wrote:

Its one of those jobs for which the old clomp it with a hammer style impact driver is actually quite handy:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/File:ManualImpactDriver.jpg
(I must have bought that over 35 years ago, and I have probably found a use for it about once per decade!)
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John.
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On Tuesday, April 3, 2018 at 1:51:11 AM UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

The old brace and bit is good for waking up screws, something to do with the impact of the swing
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On Mon, 2 Apr 2018 22:37:36 -0700 (PDT), stuart noble

I was pleasantly surprised a while ago to find that my father's old ratchet B&B circa 1950 was quite happy to take hex Phillips and pozi bits, as well as the traditional flat blade screwdriver bits designed for it. You can get a lot of torque as well as pressure with a B&B, sometime more than enough to simply shear off the screw.
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Chris

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How many doors? I’d be tempted to hire a proper door trimming saw or get a man in who is used to doing it (with the appropriate saw).
Eg. https://www.onestophire.com/door-trimming-saw.html
Tim
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