Trimming doors to fit new carpets



Interesting. In-situ use it says. Deserves further investigation. Thanks.
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Chris

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On 30/03/2018 14:25, Chris Hogg wrote:

[snip]

But be aware that the one in that link needs a 110 volt power supply.
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Mike Clarke

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On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 15:13:57 +0100 (GMT+01:00), Jim K

Hmm...perhaps not so interesting then...
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Chris

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On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 14:25:06 +0100

The problem with that is you need to know how much to trim off before the carpet has been laid.
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On 30/03/2018 12:52, Chris Hogg wrote:

Consider fitting rising but hinges and you may get away without having to cut the doors (or limit the cut), especially if there is a metal carpet joining strip at the door which will compress the carpet at that point.
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If you don't mind ugly hinges!
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electric plane...watch your fingers.....
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On 30/03/2018 12:52, Chris Hogg wrote:

If you only have a jig saw and a manual plane lay the door across a table or something with it horizontal. Clamp some bits of wood to the edges of the door at the bottom to prevent the saw splintering it. Position a straight piece of wood across the door to guide the saw, and clamp it firmly. Use the saw with no elliptical action so it doesn't splinter the wood. Also you might decide to score along the cut line with a knife, again to prevent splintering. In that case cut with the saw a tiny distance away from the score line. Use to plane to finish off, being careful not to splinter the edges.
Bill
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On Fri, 30 Mar 2018 19:34:52 +0100, Bill Wright

Thanks Bill, helpful and appropriate for the tools I've got.
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Chris

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Other thing is to lay a bit of wood with parallel sides on the floor up against the door and mark it. Then use that line as a level guide for your batten when cutting. In case the floor isn't level.
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*You can't teach an old mouse new clicks *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 30/03/2018 20:05, Chris Hogg wrote:

I had to take a few millimetres off one of our doors.
I marked the depth with a pencil, then hand plane, door on one side, cutting down. Of course you can't make the edge splinter - the floor is in the way! So you have to turn it over to do the bit that was by the floor. No real problem there, I don't see what all the fuss is about.
Andy
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Bill Wright submitted this idea :

Which means - never go all the way out to the very edge. When you get close to the edge, plane from edge towards middle of the door.
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On 30/03/2018 21:14, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

But watch out if you have a B&D power plane, as my one spins 'front to back'. So you have to work from the middle of the door outwards!
I have all sorts of tools that I've found out the hard way I'm not really competent to use.
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On 31/03/2018 13:42, GB wrote:

That's probably true of any tool in anyone's hands though ;-)
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John.
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On 31/03/2018 13:42, GB wrote:

Really? Have you checked for Live / Neutral reversed?
;-)

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Do they not fit internal doors on rising butt hinges any more?
Brian
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On Saturday, March 31, 2018 at 9:06:05 AM UTC+1, Brian Gaff wrote:

Door fitters use a plane on vertical surfaces because often they don't have room to lay a door out flat. A circular saw cut is dead fast, dead accurate, and always square. No brainer for most of us. Where is TMH when you need him?
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On 30/03/2018 12:52, Chris Hogg wrote:

Mike
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Muddymike wrote:

I made a sawboard once, but on the very first cut with it, my saw let the smoke out, unfortunately the replacement saw had a wider rather than narrower sole plate, so it could be cut-down to fit.
Now I have a pair of clamp guides
<https://its.co.uk/pd/Clamp-Guides_VNT20082.htm
And the saw has a dymo label on it reminding me of the distance from either side of the sole plate to the far edge of the blade, thankfully both my blades have a kerf width of 2mm, if I have to cut from the 'wrong' side.
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