Timber types and selection?

Hey guys!
I'm a new DIY-er and an avid flight simulation pilot. I want to make my own cockpit using MDF and timber but have no idea where to start. I've been told not to screw MDF to MDF as MDF is a weak material and will not hold for very long. The advice was to use a block of wood to hold both pieces of wood together.
I've been to my local B&Q a few times but the wood available there seems to be rather soft and flimsy. I have no idea what to ask for but I was hoping for timber/wood that was harder. My plans for my pit calls for a few lengths of timber as a structural support --- I will make a "platform" with timber underneath and a "surface" of MDF. This platform is essential because I plan to screw on (attach) the side consoles and monitor stand to this assembly.
At this point, I am really very new so I am not sure of what specific questions to ask. Any help would be appreciated.
--
bagoako


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Get googling?
Jim K
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2014 20:12:53 +0100, Nightjar wrote:

It's Harry. We know the answer to that.
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'JimK[_3_ Wrote:

Wow! Why didn't I think of that?!
John Williamson;3227960 Wrote:

That pulls the MDF towards it... which I don't think would work. What I've been advised to do is to drill THROUGH the MDF and use the block of wood + screw to hold the MDF in place. Instead of having the screw teeth inside the MDF and pulling it towards the "jointing block," the idea was to have the screw teeth inside the block of wood and use that and the screw head to "sandwich" the MDF and keep it steady... I hope that made sense.
'Andy Burns[_9_ Wrote:

Thanks, I got that on my list!
Adrian;3228002 Wrote:

Well, I was planning to build a central area to which all other parts of the cockpit would be screwed onto. The central area would also support the pilot seat so thick support timbers would be great.
I would then have two "towers" that will screw onto the central area, these towers will hold my joystick and throttle -- I am using Thrustmaster Warthog HOTAS. As the two towers will only be small, I am worried that they might warp/bend with the stresses/torque from hard yanking-and-banking and this is where I am really worried that the screws will just come off if I use the soft timber I see in B&Q.
I plan to use 18mm MDF for the central area's flooring, then maybe 12mm MDF as the walls of the tower.
Lobster;3228004 Wrote:

Thanks David! He and I have quite a few things in common, but he's a commercial bus driver. I "fly" the F-16 Falcon in Falcon BMS.
'harryagain[_2_ Wrote:

I am well on my way to my bronze badge and I have been given control during aerotow since my first training flight. Stalls and recovery discussed and performed on my 5th flight. Assisted landing (P2 worked the brakes) since my first flight as well, and did my own landing on my 4th flight. I am told this is not "normal progression" for a glider student and even the CFI acknowledges that my flight sim experience is a factor for my skill level.
Pity an ASK 21 or a Discus 1000 can't carry missiles :)
F Murtz;3228057 Wrote:

'Andy Burns[_9_ Wrote:

No access to welding tools, no welding skills, and the aluminium stuff is just expensive. Buying an Obutto or similar would end up cheaper.
newshound;3228202 Wrote:

No, I am not building a replica cockpit. I just want this for a more ergonomic position. Sitting in an office chair with my Warthog HOTAS controls on the desk means my arms are in a higher position compared to an actual pilot in a fighter plane cockpit. I am after the function of things and with my limited woodworking skills (ie, NONE!!), the less cutting I have to do, the better!!
As I've said, I do plan to make the central area with 18mm MDF, with as thick timber as I can find. I wonder why there is constant reference to plywood though.... is it stronger than MDF? The other "load-bearing" parts would be the towers I've mentioned earlier.
I've also managed to buy an actual Martin Baker ejection seat and I would need to mount it using lengths of timber, so I would need really strong/hard timber so that it doesn't flex/bend/pit from all the weight of myself plus the seat.
I gather at this point that B&Q's selection of timber isn't quality material? Is there a rating system or name for the hardness of timber? I'd like to be able to go up to a guy and say "do you have CLS timber with hardness of 5 and legth of XX.Xcm"? Also, is it possible to get properly "squared" planed timber? I'd love to do this myself but like I said, no skill, not tools too!
Thanks!
--
bagoako

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On Monday, April 28, 2014 1:15:52 AM UTC+1, bagoako wrote:

plasterboard screws are the ones to get...

36x63mm CLS would do that

forget mdf, ply or OSB are the ones to use.

+1 all round, though I'd probably skip the hardboard

some diy sheds will cut to any rectangular size for you

vastly

36x61 should do it

its cheap spruce, fine for your app as long as you avoid bent stuff

There is, but its really not relevant for this app

its called PSE. Most planed is PSE now
NT
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/ 'JimK[_3_ Wrote: > ;3227959']Get googling? > > Jim K Wow! Why didn't I think of that?!/q
I think we all know the reason...
Jim K
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WelI have done both. And tiddly little home flight simulators are bollix. No flying skills are needed.
You have to spend millions to get anywhere near realism. And even then it's limited.
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On 28/04/2014 18:52, harryagain wrote:

I have done both too. I used to use the one I posted a link to when I had a Seneca III and couldn't get out to fly it. Being designed as a training aid, it allowed me to practice recognising and responding to emergencies without actually encountering them in real flight.

You are, as usual, wrong. The few thousand for the full Elite kit is quite enough for flight training and there is an excellent EE Lightning simulator at the Tangmere that has been built by the museum volunteers on a shoe string.
Colin Bignell
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scribeth thus

http://www.transair.co.uk/pp+Gill-Aircraft-Batteries-24V-Dry-Charged+3049
Humm... hope they last a while;!...
http://www.transair.co.uk/pp+Pilot-Parachutes+2647
Now thats something you don't but every day;!...

--
Tony Sayer


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On 28/04/2014 20:37, tony sayer wrote: ....

The latest Transair catalogue was always something I looked forward to getting through the letterbox.
Colin Bignell
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On Mon, 28 Apr 2014 22:14:25 +0100, Andy Burns

It's all rather tempting to think that harryagin's nom de plume was a well considered choice (he certainly harries the this news group) with his rather provocative, and often pointless, thread starters.
--
Regards, J B Good

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Drivel, you don't experience the G forces or the full controls co-ordination. Or the weather or cockpit conditions.
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On 30/04/2014 06:56, harryagain wrote:

If you are a good pilot, your passengers shouldn't notice any g forces in flight. About the only thing I miss is the kick as you fly into your own slipstream at the end of a good 360 degree turn.

You obviously haven't been using the right simulators.

The simulator at Tangmere *is* an EE Lightning cockpit. In fact, I found it to be a better simulation than the RAF's own EE Lightning simulator which I tried in the 1960s. That cost a few million quid and took a team of operators to run.
Colin Bignell
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On 27/04/2014 12:02, bagoako wrote:

You can buy plastic jointing blocks specifically designed to join pieces of MDF together at right angles.
--
Tciao for Now!

John.
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John Williamson wrote:

Certainly MDF screwed direct to MDF, won't stand-up to much abuse.

Also screws designed specifically for MDF
<http://www.toolstation.com/shop/sd3339/p11083>
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On Sun, 27 Apr 2014 13:02:55 +0200, bagoako wrote:

Yep. Depending on what sort of weight you need it all to support, you can either use square section wood or plastic corner blocks, as somebody else has already mentioned.
If you need it to be REALLY sturdy, then the stuff used to make the structure for partition walls is cheap and ubiquitous in 3"x2" cross section. Just ask for CLS.
You probably don't need the outer skin to be as heavy as MDF - ply would probably do just fine for much of it, with MDF for the bits that need to take more hammer.

Start off by heading to a proper builder's merchant or timber yard...
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Have you come across this guy?: http://tinyurl.com/lr9yw8w (or http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2609512/Man-forced-dream-pilot- spent-15-years-20-000-building-replica-cockpit-home.html)
Might provide some ideas?
--
David

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Lobster wrote:

Take the bit by the horn and build it out of welded square steel tube and cover with light ply.
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F Murtz wrote:

Or if welding's not your thing, use one of the aluminium extrusion/connector systems
<http://www.metallin.co.uk/shop/connecting-aluminium-profile
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Nah wood covered with doped fabric, couple of wings etc
There'll be a wiki somewhere.....
Jim K
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