Tea stain removal

Hundreds of years ago, when our children were young, we resisted the purchase of a dishwasher on the grounds the nothing could beat good old elbow grease :-( When they left home, they were much more open minded and they took the first opportunity and bought their own. We were amazed how well these machines did the job - if only we had not been so superior - we would have avoided all those 'It's not my turn' arguments :-(
Anyway, we quickly rushed out and purchased our very own! Everything was given the dishwasher treatment - well nearly everything ;-) In particular, we were astonished how well our stainless steel tea pot came up! It looked like new! Mugs and cups became tea-stain free. It certainly beat Steradent tablets.
The downside is now, after many years, the cups and mugs and the teapot cannot now be de-stained - even Steradent does not now work. :-(
Does anyone know what treatment we can do to get these back to pristine condition again?
--
Marcus

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Marcus Foreman wrote:

Tried clothes washing powder? But I expect that won't work either now....
Two-pound hammer, perhaps? :-(
David
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snipped-for-privacy@frenchay.demon.co.uk says...

Make up a 10-20% solution of bleach (I've used Parazone at times)and soak the cups in it over night.
--
Paul Mc Cann

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Marcus Foreman wrote:

Bicarbonate of Soda. use neat, with just a little water as per scouring powder.
--
David Clark

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Marcus Foreman wrote:

It sounds really as if glaze has failed after all those years, so even if you can get them clean, the chances are they won't stay that way for long. Although modern dish washing powders are much better, some of the older ones that you probably used a few years ago used to be very abrasive.
You may find one of the oxygen bleaching additives designed for boosting laundry detergent performance will do the trick.
--
Cheers,

John.

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I've occasionally wondered if cleaning with very harsh caustics (caustic soda), ... Followed by reheating the pottery up to glazing temps would work.
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Marcus Foreman wrote:

caustic soda.
if tat doesn't work - or handwasing with a scourer, get new mugs.
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On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 11:15:21 GMT, Marcus Foreman

Hi,
If strong household bleach fails try something containing oxalic acid, like 'Barkeepers Friend' or decking cleaner(!)
Using liquid dishwasher detergent instead of tablets may reduce the problem with any new cups, AFAIK tablets contain a mild abrasive.
cheers, Pete.
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