Safely terminating unused gas supply

Hi
I'm currently remodelling our kitchen and right in the middle of the floor is a no-longer needed gas supply:-
http://tinyurl.com/3bxfup
I'm surprised to see that the pipe is embedded directly in the concrete - it does not appear to be sleeved in any way. I believe this is an original feature (house was built in 1980).
What is the best way to deal with this?
Cheers,
Steve
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stevelup wrote:

No brainer - the branch pipe(?) needs to be traced back to its source and isolated there.
The fact that it's not sleeved means it's vulnerable to corrosion too, so this would really want attention even if you were wanting to continue to use it.
David
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To disconnect/cap the feed before it goes under the concrete. What other gas appliances have you got and how are their gas supplies fed?
--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
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On Apr 9, 11:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Hi
It's very hard to tell -- the whole installation is buried in concrete. There is a 22mm supply to the boiler which is located between the meter and the old cooker supply that I need to remove. The cooker point is 15mm. The boiler is the only device in the house that needs a gas connection.
I'm assuming that at the location where the pipe splits and goes to the boiler I will find a reducing tee of some description. I've tried breaking random holes in the floor and cannot locate this point though.
I've now got a bee in my bonnet about the fact that these pipes seem to have been covered in concrete with no protection. I have checked my neighbours house and the installation seems to be identical.
Steve
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stevelup wrote:

Metal detector?!

I don't think I'd be happy either. IANAE but from what I've read cement corrodes copper and you run the risk of leaks. And in 1980 copper pipes wouldn't have been as thick-walled as they were in previous decades (though probably thicker than they are now!)
Where does the pipework dissappear into the concrete? How about an alternative solution, ie running a new 22mm from the boiler back towards the meter, as far as necessary to bypass the buried section?
David
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...

ISTM that the simplest solution would probably be to run a new supply to the boiler and to remove as much of the old pipework as is convenient / aesthetically necessary.
Colin Bignell
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On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 08:00:52 -0700, stevelup wrote:

Really the only thing any I can recommend is that a new supply pipe to the boiler that complies with BS 6891 is laid in and abandon the substandard installation.
In practice one might come across this professionally and I believe that provided the pipework is in good order, dry and otherwise compliant the risk categorisation would be 'AR'. I.e it is strongly recommended to fix it but you can go on using it but don't blame the gas fitter.
Trying to access the pipes in the floor will likely do much more harm than good.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk
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On Fri, 13 Apr 2007 19:15:46 +0000 (UTC), Ed Sirett

snippety snip>> I would tend to agree with Ed. This does not look like an ideal situation although it may well still be sound. It may well become a problem in the future. Best thing to do whilst you are ripping the house apart is just abandon this pipe and run a new supply to the correct standard.
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I'm not happy about the state of the existing pipework, nor do I know where any of it runs exactly.
On that basis, I've decided to have a new feed run directly to the boiler from the incoming supply.
I'm doing all the preparation (banging holes etc.) and I've been quoted approx 65 to have the work done which seems extremely reasonable.
Thanks for all the replies.
Steve
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I was going to comment on the poster who mentioned copper pipe thickness though it probably isn't necessary now ! Anyhow wasn't it in the late 70's/ early 80's that there was a copper shortage and all the copper pipes were thin walled and impossible to bend ?
Rob
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Our gaff was built at that that time (79) and we had some pipe problems so much so that one actually leaked, and did like suggested scrapped that and a new supply outside and in thru a wall not under the house!...
--
Tony Sayer



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