Replacing outbuilding windows

I have some wooden outbuilding windows that were installed c. 1976 where the windows are rotting, but the frame is fine. I would much rather replace just the window, but am not set up for joinery and the windows do not justify paying for it. I am probably out of luck, but does have anyone any suggestions on a way to search the Web or suitable places to look in the Cambridge area?
At that time, they were called 'storm' windows - i.e. they have the outside overlapping by 1 cm all round.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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On 04/09/15 20:29, Nick Maclaren wrote:

We did all this a few years ago for the house with the following result...
You can phone Soham joinery for quotes, you can phone other people for quotes some of which will be ridiculous (in the £1000s) and then you can face reality and end up with uPVC which while not actually cheap is at least affordable.
If that's not appropriate for this application then . . . at least get a quote from Soham joinery who at least know what they are doing.
PB
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Thanks for your information. I was afraid of that. But uPVC wouldn't solve anything, because it would be exactly as much hassle as replacing the windows and frames with wood. I might just use borax inserts and fill the rotten bits - it depends on which is easier.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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Cut some polycarbonate sheet to size and screw over existing window frame. for ventilation leave the door open when you are in there !
adds to security and is pretty vandal proof too
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On 05/09/15 09:21, peter wrote:

Well said, living on a busy street with very thin Edwardian glass I've had the same thought often but never done anything about it. Would also cut down the traffic noise. There's a place in Cherry Hinton that sells that sort of thing. http://www.edplastics.co.uk/
PB
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snipped-for-privacy@needham.csi.cam.ac.uk (Nick Maclaren) wrote:

If filling is an option, perhaps 'wood replacement' might be too? I have, on recommendation from a College carpenter, been using this epoxy resin alternative to replace rotten bits on the window sills of the cabin:
http://www.repair-care.co.uk/products/dry-flex-4-2-in-1
Having seen it in action and having been able to inspect the post-repair results on bits around college after a few years, I have become reasonably confident in it's 'wood replacement' value (as opposed mere 'filling' capacity). Ridgeon's carries it (but on a separate shelf from the 'wood repair' section which used to confuse me).
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Oh, yes - been there, done that. Our main windows are the original 1930 ones, and I fixed up some of them with lots of borax against rot, wood hardener, 6" nails, epoxy filler and that sort of filler. And they have lasted another 30+ years with no more than repainting.
Regards, Nick Maclaren.
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On Friday, 4 September 2015 20:29:48 UTC+1, Nick Maclaren wrote:

Make your own windows. Simple DIY project for a shed. All you need is saw, hammer, drill and tape measure. Cost maybe a tenner if you can reuse the glass.
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big tubs of car body filler are a lot cheaper than plastic wood. almost as good.
[g]
On Friday, September 4, 2015 at 8:29:48 PM UTC+1, Nick Maclaren wrote:

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