Replacement windows

Not a DIY question, but you lot know stuff ...
We're thinking of having some windows replaced with uPVC and despite much Googling, I have some questions.
We're down to two local firms, one of whom uses Liniar 6-chamber extrusion based windows without steel reinforcement and the other Rehau 3-chamber extrusion with steel reinforcement. The Liniar windows have better thermal performance, but ...
Can a window without steel reinforcement meet BS7950 or "Secured by Design"? Our house is single storey, so security is of particular interest. The supplier's brochure doesn't mention it, so I'd suspect not.
I've done shed-loads of reading (and we've had uPVC replacement windows twice before) so we're 'au fait' with the common questions (*), which are all the zillions of websites I've looked at seem to answer, so ... is there anything obscure I should be thinking about?
(* Thermal performance, quality of uPVC, coated glass, locking systems, bump/snap proof locks (there are some doors, also), warranty, who the fitters are).
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On 10/02/18 15:08, Huge wrote:

I have the Rehau steel reinforced frames and I'm quiet impressed with their overall strength. I've also seen a locksmith get into a uPVC front door without steel in 2 minutes using a lever to bend the frame.
So, me: steel every time.

To be honest, the glass is still the biggest heat leak factor, on area alone - the frames are minor.
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That's kinda the decision I'm coming to, especially for the doors.
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Also watch out if you have bay windows, too many horror stories about insufficient supporting of the top. Brian
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Huge wrote:

By coincidence I had all the windows in a flat replaced with UPVC by a firm in Borehamwood recommended to me. They did a brilliant job.
I happened to be working there repairing some of the wooden doors when they did the work. I could tell by the men employed and the way that they behaved that they were professionals.
Everything was fitted tightly. None of the shoddy fitting and later filling with caulk. The quality of the materials is excellent and although the heating had packed up, the temperature difference was immediately noticeable. If you would like the name of the firm I would be happy to supply it without hesitation.
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On 10/02/2018 18:31, Pinnerite wrote:

The modern way of fitting them is to use brick screws that are nominally 7.5 mm diam and use a 6.5 multi-purpose drill bit that goes right through the frame and the brick.
The gap is carefully filled with expanding foam to stop air leakage and the 6 mm gap around the frame and the brick opening is covered with quadrant or flat upvc mouldings that are superglued on, then a bead of clear silicon sealant used between the moulding and the brick.
This is how Anglian do it.
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On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 21:46:57 +0000, Andrew wrote:

Speed...

Properly sized there won't be a 6 mm gap all round.

Aka "Bodgers R Us". Anglian is a franschise operation. When (not if) you have problems head office will just point you back at the franchise. It says something when they need to have have a full time team following the installation teams fixing the problems...
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[12 lines snipped]

Anglian didn't even make the long-list.
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On 11/02/18 10:06, Dave Liquorice wrote:

In an ideal world... In reality, the effort required to ensure the cutout is uniform and perfectly square is not really worth the effort - and I found that, after the frame fixings, a cm of foam all around really makes the frame firm.
I do regard the plastic trim as a bodge though - all mine are plastered in after the fact :)

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On 11/02/2018 10:06, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Yes there will. If you remove Bolton&Paul timber windows there is a scallop in the back of the frame (that you cannot see from outside) which will be filled with mortar.
Crystal windoows advised measuring the brick opening and allowing for a 5 mm gap to allow for this.
Some of the 1970's timber frames weren't even exact rectangles !.
The catnic lintel above my kitchen window was 6 mm higher on one side and it wasn't obvious because the gap was filled with mortar. If I had measured the higher side, the UPVC window would not have fitted.
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On Sun, 11 Feb 2018 19:38:14 +0000, Andrew wrote:

You didn't measure the diagonals? More fool you.
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On 12/02/2018 09:35, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Wouldn't have helped.
The brick opening was exactly square but the lintel was not horizonal and the rain deflector at the top of the window, plus the lintel were mortared over in such a way that it wasn't obvious that one side was higher than the other.
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Not so sure about that.
I replaced a tiny window with a 2 meter wide (approx) one. So had to form and entire new opening for it including lintel. 6mm isn't a lot to allow the new unit to be installed absolutely plumb.
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On 12/02/2018 00:12, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

+1
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[25 lines snipped]

Thank you, but that's too far away.
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On 10/02/2018 15:08, Huge wrote:

I used Crystal Windows for some DIY-fitted windows. They had a series of options that Ford would have been proud of and I used the cheapest. OK for 48.25 inch width but the 72.25 inch wide ones deflect too easily and need to be fitted with foaming pu adhesive along the top as well as the usual mechanical side fittings.
Windows with plastic inserts rather than metal deflect very easily, so go for metal inserts every time.
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On 10 Feb 2018 15:08:25 GMT, Huge wrote:

The area taken up by the frames. When our old steel frames were replaced with uPVC we noticed the difference in light, especially with the smaller windows. If I were after new windows now, I'd seriously consider aluminium frames. They seem to be pretty good nowadays; 25 years ago I wouldn't have touched them.
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[19 lines snipped]

Doesn't bother me. We've had 2 lots of uPVC replacement windows in previous houses. What does bother me is when people don't have dummy sashes in the non-opening windows so the sight-lines are all wrong. Like this;
https://www.albionwindows.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/albion-case-study1-300x225.jpg
And this is supposedly an example of good workmanship!!!
Here's a better example;
http://ruislipwindows.co.uk/____impro/1/onewebmedia/Sightlines.jpg
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On 11/02/2018 11:09, Huge wrote:

I'm undecided on that for the many Victorian terraces where the bay windows have narrow side lights. Equal sight lines result in narrow glass (and loss of light). Might be better with slimline, metal-reinforced uPVC or modern aluminium+thermal break but I haven't seen much of that.
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That's this street. And all the replacement windows in PVC or ally look positively hideous. With some worse than others.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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