Repetitive Strain

Have you noticed that some people go through life putting un-necessary
strain on innocent items such as:
1. Locking the car and then pulling the door handle 3 times to check it is
locked.
2. Turning off a tap, drying hands and then giving the tap a further turn.
3. Inserting a plug and then giving it a thump.
4. Winding up a flex from the plug end instead of the appliance end.
(applies particularly to hairdryers, irons and hair straighteners)
Any other pet strains you have noticed?
Reply to
John
Pulling up handbrake without pushing in the button at the end.
Sometimes seems that actors are told to do this as it is rare not to hear the ratchet mechanism in films/TV.
Reply to
Rod
As I recall....and I'm not going out to the car right now...my car manual tells you not to push in the button when applying the handbrake.
OK, it's not a totally conventional handbrake handle, but near enough. (Ford S-Max 2006)
Reply to
Bob Eager
I wonder for how long we will hear the sound of an SLR to convince us in films that a photo has been taken.
My wife still asks - "did you pull the chain" when grandson uses toilet.
Reply to
John
That is because if you depress the button it is possible to release it and have the ratchet just catch on the tips. It can then release and run you over.
It can happen on other cars but the driver will always swear they have put the handbrake on properly even if they have never read the manual.
Reply to
dennis
In article , snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com says...
To be honest, how often have you had to replace a hand-brake ratchet in the last ten years? Perhaps once upon a time it was a problem, but it's certainly not a major cause of mechanical breakdowns.
Reply to
Skipweasel
In article , snipped-for-privacy@killspam.kicks-ass.net says...
And how will pressing the button prevent that? I'd say you're just as likely to drop the pawl on a chipped tooth as you are to catch one on the fly.
Reply to
Skipweasel
If the instructions are anything like those for my Mondeo, you are supposed to keep the foot brake fully depressed, then yank the handbrake on firmly without touching the button. If you release the ratchet whilst you are doing this, it is almost inevitable that your pull will have relaxed slightly by the time you engage the ratchet. The recommended method ensures you capture maximum pull.
Chris
Reply to
Chris J Dixon
Chris J Dixon used his keyboard to write :
That works on any car....
Keeping the foot brake pressed down compresses the shoes/pads permitting the hand brake lever to be pulled up further and to hold it on tighter. You can feel the difference if you press down on the pedal at the same time as you pull the lever up.
I do push the button in as I pull the lever - if it hasn't dropped into the ratchet properly, you can feel it on the button as it is released.
Reply to
Harry Bloomfield
What about car wheels always squealing even when the car has been driven off in a straight line at 20mph. Or a public address system / mic always squealing / feeding back when a person takes to the lectern, even if they never moved the mic ? Simon.
Reply to
sm_jamieson
Honestly - never. But I particularly notice it when the cars are period and might be affected by wear.
All those decades ago when I had driving lessons, my instructor made a big deal about pressing the button in - maybe to prevent wear, maybe because he couldn't stand the sound - I know not.
Since then, I have always noticed when others let the ratchet clickand prefer to to inflict that on others.
Reply to
Rod
In article ,
Many cars have totally separate handbrake mechanisms with no connection to the footbrake at all. Most BMWs, for example, have disc rear brakes which includes a drum in the centre for the handbrake. Jaguars used to have a second mechanical caliper on the rear discs for the handbrake only.
Reply to
Dave Plowman (News)
Message-ID: from Rod contained the following:
It was the general advice as I recall. But then so was the advice to get into top gear as soon as possible. Nowadays they teach 30mph = 3rd gear
Reply to
Geoff Berrow
Slamming the car door with a bunch keys of keys in the lock. You can count how many times they have done that by the number of chips in the paint caused by the other keys.
Reply to
Matty F
Pressing harder on remote control buttons when the batteries are going flat. If they're really on their way out, pressing hard and thrusting the RC towards the TV in a stabbing motion.
Reply to
PM
After serious thinking sm_jamieson wrote :
I find the squealing tyre sound effects even more amusing when the vehicle is being driven on loose sand, gravel, grass or even bare earth.
Is the tarmac in supermarket car parks specially developed to produce the squealing noise at every turn?
Reply to
Harry Bloomfield
And twiddling that knob underneath to make them change faster. Not many people know that the knob is there for visually impared people - it rotates when the green Man is on.
And pushing in front of you to press the already illuminated Lift Call button.
Reply to
John

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