repairing (?) plasterboard ceiling ....

Last year, our bungalow roof managed to develop a leak which dripped down the angled joists (whatever the proper name is ?) and onto the plasterboard that makes up the kitchen ceiling.
The leak is now sealed (I did it just before the 5 weeks of no rain :) ).
Where the water dripped onto the plasterboard, a section about 12" square has been slightly pushed down and broken through. The ceiling was papered over, and I must have done a good job, as the paper is intact apart from a slight hole I dug to drain the water.
Is there scope for somehow cutting out the damaged section, and replacing it with something like plywood ? The cosmetic finish doesn't have to be 100%, so I am thinking of slicing the stretch of paper involved out to undertake the work, and then restick it.
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Well, depending on how big I suppose. The smallest deformation can often be pushed back with some new dampness, but prolonged upward force is needed from a post. Brian
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On 15/10/2018 16:45, Jethro_uk wrote:

Remove damaged plasterboard, insert some wooden battens to bridge the hole, screw battens to existing PBoard, cut a piece of PBoard to fit the hole, screw the new Pboard to the battens, fill the edges, re-stick paper, have a glass of wine.
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Lots and lots of videos on youtube of mending plasterbaord by various methods
On Monday, October 15, 2018 at 5:01:24 PM UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

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On Mon, 15 Oct 2018 17:01:19 +0100, nothanks wrote:

Ah, starting to sound like a plan ...
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On Monday, 15 October 2018 17:01:24 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@aolbin.com wrote:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Fill
NT
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On 15/10/2018 19:08, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

or
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Patching_plasterboard
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"Jethro_uk" wrote in message

Cut out damaged section and cut a repair piece of plaster board that over-laps a couple of inches all round. Put in place from above with a brick on top seating on sloppy wet plaster. Cut second repair piece that fits the hole but is smaller by 3/8" all round, butter with a bit of sloppy wet plaster and secure in place with plasterboard screws. When that has set plaster up the 3/8" gap using skrim in your skim coat. When set you can remove the brick for next time :)
Andrew
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On 15/10/18 16:45, Jethro_uk wrote:

cut out a large section - all the damage
cut a new piece of plasterbaord to fit the hole
get some 1 x 1/2 battern and screw it around the edge of the hole to thecexisting plasterboard, but jutting out to form a rebate
screw the new plasterboard to that.
Skim the resultant hollow with bonding plaster
sand it back if you are a crap skimmer
redecorate the whole section
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On 15/10/2018 19:26, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

+1 to all that...

Not sure I would skim it with bonding though... multi-finish or one coat would get a much smoother result.
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On Mon, 15 Oct 2018 19:26:40 +0100, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

That'd be me :)

was hoping to keep that bit to the minimum ....
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On Mon, 15 Oct 2018 15:45:01 -0000 (UTC), Jethro_uk wrote:

As others have said cut out the damaged section and replace with a bit of new plaster board and skim. More detail and what I'd do:
Cut out the damaged bit plus a couple of inches. Then expand that area to half way across the nearest ceiling joists. Square (rectangle) the hole and fit noggings made from 2 x 2 between the joists hard down on the back of the existing plaster board and sticking out over the over the edge to form a rebate. Remove any skim arround edge of opening for about 2", deeply score it to stop too much coming off... Fix edge of plasterboard to noggins and joists with plasterboard screws. Cut a new bit of plaster board to fit the opening with a good 1/8" gap all round. Fix to joists and noggins with PB screws. Apply skrim tape along the the joins and skim, forcing the skim through the tape and well into the gap behind.
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Jethro_uk wrote:

One thing that once worked for me. Cut out the bulging piece. Make it very wet, and put weight on it to flatten it (I generally have breeze blocks lying around in the garden). When dry, screw it to battens. If I'd had some No More Nails at the time, I'd have probably tried that, but I have a big bag of ceiling screws that I need to use up. I don't know if this is all officially a good idea, but the piece is still there, and can't be seen unless you really look hard for it.
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