Purpose of concrete-in metposts?

Why would these be any better/easier than simply concreting the wooden post straight in? http://www.metpost.co.uk/mp_concrete_in.html
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If the post needs to be removable.
If you want to make post replacement easier in the future.
If you have only got posts the height of the fence (i.e. not enough to reach to the bottom of the required hole).
If you want to avoid digging more than the few inches for the concrete.
If you like the look of rusting orangey metal at the bottom of your fence posts.
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I thought of that. But I couldn't think of any reason to remove a post unless it needs replacing.

Those metposts rust as fast as the wood rots.

Perhaps. But then I would have measured the posts correctly before buying them. Buying a longer piece of wood is cheaper than buying a metpost aswell.

It recommends an 18" cube of concrete. Would that not be sufficient for the wood itself?

Indeed! You'd think they would galvanise them!
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I built an arris rail fence in 1986 where the posts are socketed in the metal spike version (no concrete - you hammer them in). Neither the posts (which are untreated) nor the metal has rotted/rusted away, and the fence it still rock solid. Some neighbours who comcreted their wooden posts into the ground are on their third set IIRC over the same period. The trick is to keep the timber clear of the ground. It rots at the air/ground boundary. Some metal post supports might rust through, but I haven't seen any which have in decades.

Yes, but you'll have to smash that up and get it out in order to replace the post in 8 years.

Doesn't seem to be any need, but the make I used 25 years ago (Fensock) doesn't seem to exist anymore, and Metapost doesn't look to be as well made.
If I was actually specifying a new fence now, I would specify use of reinforced concrete repair spurs to be concreted into the ground, and posts to be bolted to them above ground.
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wrote:

Mine had grass growing against the metposts, hence were damp.

Ditto for the rusted metpost.

They aren't. I think it's just steel with a single coat of crappy paint. I suppose you could treat them yourself first.

Fort Knox?
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Wew've some metposts in the garden - put in by previous owner, but from what I know of the history of the garden, they are probably a good 20+ years old at least. They are still sound (if a bit rusty).
BTW, you can get galvanise Metposts, but don't see them around much it seems.
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On 28/09/2012 20:02, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

The trick with concreting is to bring the concrete above the earth level. Most people seem to dig the hole, insert post, fill with concrete to below ground level and then infill again with soil. The air ground boundary is always wet soil. I've always tapered the concrete up the post to 1 inch above ground level. 4 inch Wooden posts erected this way have lasted me 10years+.
However, the previous oak posts were at the end of their useful life at nearly 60+years and these were just in soil - no concrete at all - the bottom of the posts tapered outwards to hold them firmly in the ground.
I recently purchased a couple of "treated" fence posts (not for fencing) and cut them down - the treatment was only skin deep and hadn't penetrated the wood at all. I suspect that treatment applied to posts purchased from the sheds would last, at best, a few days at the ground level boundary.
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On Sat, 29 Sep 2012 06:24:21 +0100, alan wrote:

Yes, I tapered mine up in a dome and pressed some small gravel into it to make it blend in a bit.

I paid extra for pressure-treated fencing, raised the bottom of the post on pebbles, treated the buried part yet again and, as there had been rotting posts in some positions, liberally splashed anti-rot liquid in and around the hole (it's a good weed killer!).
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On 28/09/2012 17:53, polygonum wrote:

and
the post won't rot as fast...
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wrote:

Mine did, mind you the parrots chewed off the protective coating. And some had a hedge against them which will have increased the damp.
Anyway, the metpost will rust.
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ull> wrote:

The rot proofing is very toxic,you shouldn't let wood gnawing birds near it. If you get decent quality post fixings they will last 20 years or more. They should be galvanised and powder coated.
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They were posts from B&Q, not sure what the treatment is - I think is blasted through the wood?

Never had a problem with them doing it.
So what should I use? Wood with no treatment that will disappear in 1 year?!?

Metpost is obviously a cheapy shite make then.
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On 29/09/2012 11:31, Lieutenant Scott wrote:

Vacuum / pressure injected:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromated_copper_arsenate

You could use a naturally durable timber like oak...
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wrote:

ARSENIC!!!??? WTF are they doing using that? I wonder what the results of burning in a confined space are. I can imagine plenty people sticking some on their log fire in their living room.

That is very expensive. The parrots do not EAT the wood, so maybe it's not as bad as it sounds.
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On 29/09/2012 15:32, Lieutenant Scott wrote:

Its good at killing stuff, just want you want from a treatment designed to prevent fungal and insect attack.

Probably not good for you. Try to avoid inhaling the dust when working on it as well.

Its not too bad if you buy it as green oak...
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wrote:

It's good at killing people.

There was a reason we banned asbestos.....
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ull> wrote:

They no longer use arsenic and copper. I believe it's chromium now. Still pretty nasty stuff. You shouldn't burn old preserved timber. The arsenic gets into the soil and henc into vegetables grown there.The smoke won't do you any good either.
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burning in a confined space are. I can imagine plenty people sticking some on their log fire in their living room.

I'm sure plenty people use old wood on their fire or wood burning stove instead of buying fresh stuff.
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e.null> wrote:

The preservatives are really nasty. If this is for an aviary project your should get the all metal free-standing panels.
OR Nail pieces of thin metal on to the posts so the birds can't get at the wood. Very important.
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It is my old and now rotted away outdoor aviary.
I now have an indoor aviary with pre-made wood panels. I don't know what they're treated with, but it was surface coating only.
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