"Peritelevision" = SCART?

Anyone else ever seen a TV marked "peritelevision" instead of "SCART"?
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Peritel is the original spec and some of those used a modified Din connector. The oold Amstrad version of the Spectrum computer had a peritel port on it it was a din. When the french inventedthe scart they used the same electrical specs, but added to it and called it Scart.
I am sure its initials mean something in the French. Brian Brian Gaff - snipped-for-privacy@blueyonder.co.uk
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Newsgroups: alt.usage.english,alt.home.repair,uk.d-i-y Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2017 4:39 PM Subject: "Peritelevision" = SCART?
Anyone else ever seen a TV marked "peritelevision" instead of "SCART"?
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So peritelevision refers to the electrical spec?

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As I remember it, the connector was mandatory on French TVs to allow for a decoder. Peritel simply stood for peripheral tv connetor.
Brian's comment "It was a din" implies the German's also adopted it as a standard. DIN being the same as BS. A quick Google showns that SCART was the French equivalent of BREMA. - a truely international connector. It's biggest drawback was the lack of a latch.

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Explain "decoder". Like a Sky box?
I'm surprised the French would make something mandatory like that, Germany or Switzerland perhaps....

And that it the thick cable was big enough to pull it out. And because the cable came out the side, it was 50% likely to be on the wrong side.

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France embarked on some analogue channels being "scrambled" in someway. A decoder was needed to view them. A payment card could be inserted in the decoder.

Well, they did. Probably to protect home industry. They were good at that.
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So the SCART was used as input AND output simultaneously?

Sounds more like something America would do.
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Yes.

France was very good at it, too.
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Interesting. Why not put the signal from the aerial into the decoder, then through to the TV?

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If you fed the aerial into the decoder, it would need a complete receiver.

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Seems to work in the UK. Although perhaps tech had advanced a bit by then.
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Oh, it would work, just cost lot more.
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The spec of the interconnection really. It goes back to the analogue days. Has rgb and composite and stereo sound both ways and a pin with voltage on it to do switching of inputs. However some scarts are not complete. I've come across them with just composite, no RGB at all and no switching pin. Also when the different aspect ratios started to come in other pins in the Scart started to be used for that switching as well. I guess you can look on it as the analogue version of hdmi but without the anti piracy built in to the latter system, and no HD.
Brian
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Yes some equipment didn't do RGB, quite annoying.
Quite useful the pin that tells the TV to change input when you play a DVD though.
There was antipiracy in analogue - activision or something. Easy to remove with a signal "cleaner".

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On Thu, 03 Aug 2017 16:39:38 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"
I haven't seen one, but I know "Peritel(ivision)" as another name for SCART.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCART
SCART (from Syndicat des Constructeurs d'Appareils Radiorécepteurs et Téléviseurs – Radio and Television Receiver Manufacturers' Association) is a French-originated standard and associated 21-pin connector for connecting audio-visual (AV) equipment. It is also known as Péritel (or Peritelevision) (especially in France), 21-pin EuroSCART (Sharp's marketing term in Asia), Euroconector,[1] EuroAV or EXT. In America, another name is EIA Multiport (an EIA interface).
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On Thu, 03 Aug 2017 20:33:47 +0100, "James Wilkinson Sword"

Because at the time that was a small as a connector could be made with that number of pins. My understanding is that here have been advances in metallurgy which have made it possibly to have much smaller, but still reliable, springy, contacts.
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Plenty of connectors around then with much denser pin count. The SCART was probably designed for cheapness.
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Paignton 159 series, for instance. Much use din thn BBC.

I'm sure.
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On 03/08/2017 23:07, Peter Duncanson [BrE] wrote:

There were higher density connectors (in various fields) around when SCART was introduced. SCART was simply cheap and easy to assemble and a standard at a time there wasn't really one. As connectors go, to put it mildly, it isn't very good. Having said that, given they tend not to be plugged /unplugged that often etc., they did the job.
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