PAT


says...

Corse you can, it happens all the time with stuff that's just hung on the wall and isnt allowed to be used anymore like battle axes, claymores, medieval flails etc.
Even the parliamentary mace isnt meant to be used anymore, just carried around and used as a stage prop to bang on the door with etc. There'd be hell to pay if some fool in fancy dress broke the door down with it.
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On 14/03/2019 12:06, Terry Casey wrote:

You can drive old cars without brake lights/seatbelts and really old ones with barely any brakes on the London to Brighton 'old crocks' race.
--
Max Demian

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On Thursday, 14 March 2019 12:06:57 UTC, Terry Casey wrote:

that shouldn't change the live chassi issue, but the connectors are mostly not compliant - touchable live pins, no cordgrip. Can be bypassed.

Fit felt washer, cut one if necessary. A soft epoxy resin over the set screw.

as long as it's not touchable. If it is, affix plastic netting.

the connector usually

not IME. A lot of vintage heaters are fails by design.

or ebay
NT
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In article <e5784359-80eb-490a-9440-60969b339866

Not in my experience.
The pins of the male connector don't protrude beyond the back of the set which has a slot with just enough clearance for the female connect to pass through so that the only time that the pins are exposed is when the connector is removed.
I've vever come acros a connector without a cord grip (usually moulded serrations in both sides so that the flat flex is firmly clamped when the fiving screw is tightened.

I was thinking of a drop of molten candle wax!

No, for the reason I stated above
--

Terry

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On Thursday, 14 March 2019 19:36:57 UTC, Terry Casey wrote:

tly not compliant - touchable live pins, no cordgrip. Can be bypassed.

I've not encountered a lot of connectors on the appliance, but IMLE they mo stly failed. Some had bare pins sticking out, though a lot were as you say shrouded. Shr ouded connectors were frequently touchable live when part-way in. Bulgins were usually unscrewable without a tool, so require a mod to stop t hat
And that circa 1910 hotplate? It had 3 sticking out pins connected to diffe ring points of the element. The mains lead had 3 separate 1 pole sockets on . The power level depended on which pins the L&N sockets were pushed onto. The remaining pin was of course live. Hopefully you pushed the socket on th e 3rd green wire onto it, and didn't foolishly connect it to earth in the p lug. Of course there was no earth conection on the hotplate. But even with all 3 connectors on you could still touch the live bits.

I've seen tons of old mains connectors that lacked an effective cordgrip. I t's a frequent problem

screw.

not robust enough
NT

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In article <63cdacc4-2fb5-4e8f-8432-098591ca6b19

I spent 9 years repairing radios and TVs from 1960 - 69, so saw a wide variety of sets dating back to the early/mid 50s from numerous manufacturers and never saw a set with exposed pins. The connectors were all variants of a 5A 2 pin flex connector, which is exactly what we used on the bench - the manufacturers special version never left the customer's home.
There was a variant we occasionally saw, a polarised connector with one standard size pin and one thin pin but a length of matchstick in the appropriate hole of the female bench connector resolved that problem!
By the end of the 60s, all manufacturers had moved away from the detachable mains lead concept and new sets had integral leads.

H yes, the Bulgin P73 and P74 and the later miniature P360 - I remember them well! What form does the mod take?

Yes, I can recall a number of plugs that were expected to be fitted with cables much thicker that thin twin flex that left a lot to be desired!

Fair enough. I have, on very rare occasions, come across knobs with a short plastic grub screw fitted on top of the metal screw but I doubt you could find them these days and, of course, they would need BA threads!
Thinking about it, the knobs must have been specially made too as you wouldn't normally expect to find a threaded hole in the plastic part.
--

Terry

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On Friday, 15 March 2019 11:09:55 UTC, Terry Casey wrote:

50s TVs were the first things I tried to repair, but mostly my experience has been with anything other than TVs. Largely various audio stuff.

It's a long time since I even saw a Bulgin. A small screw somewhere stops it unscrewing by hand, but I don't recall just where the screw went, other than through the plastic thread.

yes, and a lot with what are perhaps best described as unsuccessful attempts at cordgrips.

Turns out it's quite practical to duplicate old knobs now. Silicone to make a mould + resin.
NT
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On 15/03/2019 11:09, Terry Casey wrote:

I recall leaning on the front of a military transmitter sometime in the 70s - it may well have been 50s vintage.
I recall it because there were three live mains pins on the front. It hurt.
Andy
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On 14/03/2019 12:06, Terry Casey wrote:

There are some where the live chassis is accessible with a regular mark one finger!

Perhaps the solution is if that is your thing, to visit all the likely shops and leave them a card saying if you get any donations of this kind of kit, please let me know and I will come get it.
(or failing that, offer to do free PAT testing for them on the understanding you can keep any "interesting" stuff that won't pass the test).
--
Cheers,

John.
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On Thursday, 14 March 2019 22:52:37 UTC, John Rumm wrote:

Loads of historic stuff hasn't a gnat's chance in hell of passing a PAT test. OTOH some was very progressive on safety.

Generally thy won't do it as it leaves them liable.
NT

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On Tue, 12 Mar 2019 13:15:05 +0000, Bill Wright

Really?
I would suggest that you are not fit to plug the dammned cable into a socket.

Sums up the approach fully does it not?
One should either do things correctly or not at all.
Being bothered 100% of the time is mandatory!
AB
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On 12/03/2019 19:22, Archibald Tarquin Blenkinsopp Esq wrote:

What danger would befall me or others were I to do that? Bear in mind that I used to buy and install extension cables 25 at a time, and I used to buy 13A plugs fitted with 3A fuses by the hundred and use them all, and in fifty years I didn't electrocute or otherwise harm a single person.
Bill
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On Wednesday, 13 March 2019 03:44:34 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

I used to do various silly things with mains when a kid, no-one got harmed, doesn't mean it was safe.
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On 13/03/2019 12:58, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Comparing your childhood antics with my lifetime's experience is false equivalence.
Bill
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On Thursday, 14 March 2019 01:37:38 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

I think the point is clear enough.
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On 14/03/2019 09:15, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's clearly fallacious if that's what you mean.
Bill
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On Thursday, 14 March 2019 12:37:16 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

your point that not being harmed equals safe certainly was. I think we can agree on that.
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On 14/03/2019 17:52, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My point being twofold. One, that where a risk has been shown to be effectively non-existent by the situation occurring many times without harm befalling man or beast then it should be treated that way, and two, that having assessed and used countless mains extension leads without harming the afore mentioned man or beast, I am de facto qualified to test mains extension leads.
Bill
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On Thursday, 14 March 2019 19:49:02 UTC, Bill Wright wrote:

absolutely, as long as the number of successes is high enough

that is the nonsequitur. You may be very well qualified to test them, but not because no-one has gotten hurt.
NT
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On 15/03/2019 01:29, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What better qualification could I have? Maybe a piece of paper handed out after a three hour course at the local tech?
Bill
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