Overpainting black bitumen paint?

While fixing up the workshop, I've painted the bottom 18" of the back internal wall with Aquaseal black bitumen paint in an effort to prevent damp coming through (the construction is slightly complicated to explain - the bottom of it is a concrete pad which is next door's [somewhat higher] ground level, so it's a bit susceptible to damp).
Anyways, next up will be to paint the rest of the walls and floor, and I'd quite like to overpaint the bitumen area at the same time, just for cosmetic reasons. I emailed the mfr for recommendations on what to use, and was advised: "our bitumen paint range cannot be over painted with any paints that I am aware of as they bleed oils when heated up. The only way to find out would be by contacting a paint manufacturer as they may have something that we at Everbuild are unaware of".
So, any suggestions?! Do we reckon stain-block paint would do the trick, or is bitumen paint too much for it to handle? I don't want to waste my time overpainting it if it's going to bleed through anyway; it would look worse than just leaving it... it's only a workshop after all!
Thanks David
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Lobster wrote:

I've not found anything to stop bleeding when overpainting. In my workshop I have hung polythene sheet*, polystyrene insulation & timber battens and then clad in plywood. I then painted the plywood That works!
Bob
*bitumen attacks polystyrene as well.
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On 05/07/2011 07:43, Lobster wrote:

There used to be a paint for this job, but it is decades since I used it, so who made it and what it was called are long gone. There are solar reflective paints for flat roofs, but I doubt they are cheap and probably only come in very large containers. The standard of finish might also be a bit lower for a roof and I don’t know if they can be overpainted. I do recall that the paint I used was heavily loaded with aluminium, which may also be true of the solar reflective paints, so, if you can’t find it from a specialist paint manufacturer, an aluminium primer paint might work. If all else fails, or it does bleed through, you could always make a feature of painting the bottom of the whole wall black.
Colin Bignell
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Try water based masonry paint. I once had an end terrace which had black bitumen paint over the entire gable end. Went to the experts... in person to paint shops, manufacturers by email, etc. All seemed clueless. Tried the masonry paint and it was fine. Anything with a hint of solvent is bad news in this situation.
mark
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The issue isnt staining, its failure to adhere. Bitumen is famous for nothing much sticking. You can torch things onto it though - perhaps you could even iron lining paper on, I dont know.
NT
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On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 07:43:14 +0100, Lobster

You are bound not to want to pay for this option, I don't know how much it costs but it is bound to be very expensive. But it does list tarmac as a substrate - which is quite close to bitumen.
http://www.johnstonestrade.com/product-range/product.aspx?product=Two_Pack_Adhesion_Promoting_Primer
Rod
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On Tuesday, July 5, 2011 at 4:43:14 PM UTC+10, Lobster wrote:

you could use ormonoid silversheild as it is made for overpainting ormonoid bitumen paint.
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On Tuesday, 5 July 2011 07:43:14 UTC+1, Lobster wrote:

Primer coat of PVA first. However, if there is positive water pressure the bitumen will flake off anyway. So not a good solution. Google "tanking" for proper solutions to problem. You local builders merchants probably have some products.
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David, Did you find a answer that worked as I have the same problem. Chris
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On 04/12/2015 11:54, sat snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Aluminium Primer? http://www.duluxtradepaintexpert.co.uk/web/pdf/datasheets/204.pdf
http://tinyurl.com/pkae5rx
20+ years ago when I renovated my house most of the paint work had an undercoat very much like tar. It appeared to be rather sticky even when left for many weeks. A lot of hard work got it most of it off and a coat or two of aluminium primer has stopped any bleed coming through white painted surfaces.
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mailto: news admac {dot] myzen co uk

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I used black bitumen, on a wall, then an oil based gloss paint, followed by a water based masonry paint. No black has come through. The idea was to change paint types from bitumen, to oil then finally to water based.
If left to dry long enough bitumen paint is fine to paint over. Like all old paint, it is best to wash of surface grease and salts.
Ray
On Tuesday, July 5, 2011 at 7:43:14 AM UTC+1, Lobster wrote:

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On 14/08/2016 18:32, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

> No black has come through. > The idea was to change paint types from bitumen, to oil then finally to water based.
Take it he has painted it a few times since, as the OP was over five years ago.
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2011 eh. Funny how these threads come back to life.
Brian
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On Tuesday, 5 July 2011 07:43:14 UTC+1, Lobster wrote:

I gave some bitumous paint several coats of PVA and then painted it. Was OK for ten years at least. If there was positive water pressure behind it, you might get flaking off.
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replying to Lobster, Harvey wrote: Hi I'm painter and decorator from the uk we use to paint over bitumen with. Aluminium primer sealer 1st then we carried on as normal .
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replying to Harvey, Anthony D wrote: Aluminium primer is a wonder paint. It stops metal from rusting, seals against water ingress and can be used instead of bitumen paint in many situations. It can also act as a wood preservative by trapping the oils in the wood and preventing it drying out. ( make sure wood is not wet with water first though)
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replying to Lobster, ayesha wrote: to the best of my limited knowledge, you need to overcoat it with a bituminous aluminium paint; followed by 2 or 3 coats waterbased paint in your choice of color
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So I’ve made a mistake and painted an internal wall with black bitu men paint and then put a layer of emulsion which has started to flake off.
Would I be alright to put a layer of PVA and then paint over it again?
Many thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I don't think you stand a chance.
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