Has my flashing been done OK?`

I've just had the flashing replaced on a chimney and would appreciate views on the work, as I'm a bit nervous about what I've seen. (I know this is a DIY group, but this was too specialised a job for me.)
This photo:
http://i409.photobucket.com/albums/pp173/foolishalec/tile_gap_2.jpg
shows a badly replaced and broken tile. There's a large gap where I think rain can blow in under the tile.
This photo:
http://i409.photobucket.com/albums/pp173/foolishalec/tile_gap_1.jpg
also shows a badly replaced tile. Again, there's a large gap where I think rain can blow in under the tile.
In the bottom left of this photo:
http://i409.photobucket.com/albums/pp173/foolishalec/gap_bottom_left.jpg
you can see a black opening. Although you can't tell from the photo, water would directly run into the hole. If there's suitable leadwork behind the hole, I'd guess it's OK, but I can't tell. Is this likely to be a problem?
Views appreciated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well its on a place I wouldnt venture (roof) but I reckon those tiles need sorting, cant comment on the lead flashing.
I hope you get more constructive opinions.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve wrote:

Tile and cement work should be sorted out (shouldn't have been left in that condition). But if there is sarking felt under the tiles and it is in good condition, then that should prevent water running into the building.

Same comments as above - needs sorting

That joint is where the corner of the flashing appears to have been used to 'clip' the corner of the flashing down to prevent wind pressure blowing it open (and the 'hole' would be normal in this case (although some of the better tradesmen will take the time to lead-burn joints like that when forming the back gutter).
There should also be a separate lead soaker under the flashing (dressed over the top of the tile profile) and rising several inches up (and against) the wall preventing any water leaking into the roof space.
The leadwork finish does seem to be a bit rough-and-ready though - especially the w.
My general opinion would be that the leadwork (from the photo) would appear to be serviceable -- (I would like to have seen the soakers on the tiles and back-gutter in their entirety, along with the depth of the chase in the cement joint for the flashings before the work was 'closed up').
But I would suggest that the people who did the job, should be called back to rectify the broken tiles (I assume that they were part of the job) -- free of charge to you.
Out of interest, was it a roofer/general builder/plumber or a 'handyman' doing the job?
Cash
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

. . .
Thanks Cash. Yes, I'll be calling them back. I used a 'proper' roofing company. They did some lead-burning so I guess they weren't total cowboys - just shoddy/low standards.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 4 Jul 2011 23:32:17 +0100, Steve wrote:

All looks a bit shoddy to me and a classic illustration as to why I hate getting people in to do work. I rarely feel that they have done a better job than I could have.
The broken tile needs to be replaced, it's a fresh break so presumably they broke it.
The second tile could do with seating a bit better but that might not be possibble looking at the way some of the other tiles are lying.
The flashing should be OK if not ideal or a particulary neat job. *PROVIDED* there is a properly fitted soaker behind the hole.
--
Cheers
Dave.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for that Dave. Yes, I agree about getting people in to do work. Practically everyone, from dentists to builders seem to rush and do a shoddy job these days. (Not that I'm advocating DIY dentistry.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not the best tiles to work with, " Simons of Bridgewater Clay metered Double Roman Tiles" not now made. The broken tile will let in driving rain and snow, as the piece thats broken off is the overlap cover that covers the mitre. The other tile is out of line and needs re adjusting so the tile below to the left doesnt lift the one above up. The flashing looks reasonable but with out a closer look can't really comment. The black hole looks as if it's dirt lodge in the cut lead over side flashing. This type of tile is single lap and doesnt have soakers, only an over cover flashing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

To be perfectly honest I dislike cement fillet flashing. It can't cope with any movement - and tiles are likely to expand at a different rate to bricks as they heat and cool. Decently done lead flashing is the answer.
--
*Husbands should come with instructions

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.