OT(ish) - delivery from eBay of small electronic components

On Thursday, 25 January 2018 21:20:00 UTC, Roger Hayter wrote:

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it's entirely useless unless you're using the lead in a damp location
NT
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I've had problems with oxide on those rather horrid DIN connectors indoors - in a house which is never damp.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 10:48:28 UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yes, like 3.5mm jacks, 5 pin DINs are only fit for limited use. Gold doesn't really solve that though. If you use something suitable like phonos or 1/4" jacks there's no real upside to gold unless the environment is corrosive.
NT
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Tuchel do a connector with the same pin size and spacing as DIN - but more usually found on pro gear. And that has a better plating to the contacts and seems to be pretty reliable.
I dunno what they use on the ordinary cheap DIN connectors - but I've seen several heavily corroded. Not something you seem to find often on other types of connector.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 15:17:56 UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

quite, the problem is something other than lack of gold. They're junk grade stuff.
3.5mm is simply too small to be robust enough to last normal use. Again gold is not the solution.
NT
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On Fri, 26 Jan 2018 11:30:51 -0800, tabbypurr wrote:
====snip===

The whole point of gold plating contact surfaces is to improve reliability of the galvanic connection. Gold plating achieves this in two ways. The first and obvious way being the elimination of tarnishing which would create a high contact resistance in the case of base metals. The second, seemingly less obvious way, being the larger effective area of contact due to Gold's malleability creating an electrical gasket effect that improves electrical conductivity across the whole of the larger contact area.
Unfortunately, due to the very high price of Gold, its use as a contact plating material can significantly increase the BoM costing of any component parts such as DB25 connectors, memory modules and ISA/PCI/PCIe adapters cursed with connectors that have contact counts ranging upwards of 25 and beyond so a compromise is applied in the form of extremely thin platings which can be guaranteed only to be good for as little as a mere 25 insertion cycles!
An alternative compromise is the use of "Hard Gold Alloy" plating which gives a much longer insertion cycles lifetime rating but at the expense of the initial quality of contact resistance achievable with unalloyed Gold platings. You retain the tarnish resistance but the price of that wear resistance is that you lose a lot of the benefit of the electrical gasket effect inherent with unadulterated gold plating. As a result, such hard gold alloy platings are more susceptible to the effects of contamination from air pollution (grease and dust).
Fortunately, this propensity to poor contact can be mitigated by 'exercising' the connector through a few insertion cycles (three or four cycles seems to be the charm with memory modules and PC adapter cards - especially beneficial when assembling a desktop PC from a complete set of brand new component parts).
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On 26/01/2018 11:40, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Unless the box is hermetically sealed then a corrosive atmosphere that affects the plugs is likely to kill the internal electronic components.
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 23:58:19 UTC, alan_m wrote:

In almost all cases it just corrodes the surface of the wiring. Paper caps are to some extent suseptible to damp though.
NT
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On 26/01/2018 10:10, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No, gold connectors avoid tarnishing where others would, even in quite benign conditions and that is useful with low level signals. Much of industry only purchases industrial relays with gold contacts for control systems (even inside indoor control panels) - silver are fine for higher voltages and currents.
SteveW
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 20:55:55 UTC, Steve Walker wrote:

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it's only useful if your connectors have an otherwise inadequate mating sur face area.

a very different situation to signal connectors
NT
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On 25/01/2018 21:19, Roger Hayter wrote:

Most gold plating is a very thin layer, where the metal below has a habit of migrating through the gold and then leading to an oxide layer. Better than nothing though.
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 11:01:27 UTC, Fredxx wrote:

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Yes it's amazing how cheap gold foil can be having brought some gold foil t hat I'm trying to stick to an electroscope !!!!
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 11:59:56 UTC, whisky-dave wrote:

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that I'm trying to stick to an electroscope !!!!
electroplating is many times thinner
NT
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 14:19:12 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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il that I'm trying to stick to an electroscope !!!!

Yes so should be even cheaper, as gold is used to eliminate tarnishing of t he connector a very thin layer is easily scratched so may not be much use l ong term. So a good quality lead should have a reasonable thick gold layer but I;ve no idea how much extar such a lead would cost but I wouldn't have thought more than a couple of quid worth of gold.
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 14:43:46 UTC, whisky-dave wrote:

foil that I'm trying to stick to an electroscope !!!!

the connector a very thin layer is easily scratched so may not be much use long term. So a good quality lead should have a reasonable thick gold laye r but I;ve no idea how much extar such a lead would cost but I wouldn't hav e thought more than a couple of quid worth of gold.
ie you don't know.
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 15:03:35 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

d foil that I'm trying to stick to an electroscope !!!!

of the connector a very thin layer is easily scratched so may not be much u se long term. So a good quality lead should have a reasonable thick gold la yer but I;ve no idea how much extar such a lead would cost but I wouldn't h ave thought more than a couple of quid worth of gold.

I know I don't know, that's the advantage in that I wouldn't pay an extar £100 for gold plated leads a couple of quid for me would proabbly be w orth it.
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On 26/01/18 15:20, whisky-dave wrote:

gold has value on low analogue signal pins: it has virtually none on digital signals
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 15:52:00 UTC, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

d foil that I'm trying to stick to an electroscope !!!!

g of the connector a very thin layer is easily scratched so may not be much use long term. So a good quality lead should have a reasonable thick gold layer but I;ve no idea how much extar such a lead would cost but I wouldn't have thought more than a couple of quid worth of gold.

ar £100 for gold plated leads a couple of quid for me would proabbly b e worth it.

but I brought gold plated HDMI cable it's was about 50p more than one that wasn't.
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On 26/01/18 15:59, whisky-dave wrote:

More fool you
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 16:23:42 UTC, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

:
old foil that I'm trying to stick to an electroscope !!!!

ing of the connector a very thin layer is easily scratched so may not be mu ch use long term. So a good quality lead should have a reasonable thick gol d layer but I;ve no idea how much extar such a lead would cost but I wouldn 't have thought more than a couple of quid worth of gold.

xtar £100 for gold plated leads a couple of quid for me would proabbly be worth it.

hat wasn't.

why the gold plated versions seemd better and not just the plating but over all.
I'll always aviod getting the absolute cheapest of anything anyway and I'm not stopping at cables.
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