OT: car tyres

On Sun, 05 May 2019 11:51:10 +0100, Scott wrote:

When we had a caravan over 10 years ago, it was recommended to replaced tyres irrespective of wear after 5 years.
Exposure to UV light can degrade the sidewall risking a blow out.
Seemed good advice to me. But then I've seen sidewalls crack. If you haven't, you might be tempted to assume it's just scaremongering. Depends how exciting you want life to be, really ....
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On Sun, 5 May 2019 16:22:47 -0000 (UTC), Jethro_uk

How do you know whether a cracked sidewall is due to UV degradation or mechanical damage due to parking errors? My father if the car collided with the kerb would shout: 'That's 500 miles off the life of the tyre'. .
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On Sun, 05 May 2019 17:26:19 +0100, Scott wrote:

Well until it blows, you don't. As I said, a lot depends on how exciting you (and any passengers) prefer your lives.
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On Sun, 05 May 2019 17:26:19 +0100, Scott

Because there is generally a big difference between the overall cracking (or even if localised) and the result of contact damage.
The chunky M&S remould tyres on our kitcar were showing signs of sidewall cracking and splitting and even though they passed the MOT ('superficial') I didn't like it. I contacted the supplier who after being sent a photo of said deterioration, offered to replace both tyres at their cost. Not bad for tyres that were cheap in the first place and probably 10 years old!
I need to make up some sun guards (floor protection sheet?) to stand over the trailer wheels to help keep the sun off them.
Cheers, T i m
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On 05/05/2019 17:54, T i m wrote:

Isn't there also a problem with having the weight of the vehicle sitting on the same bit of the tyre for a long periods with vehicles that are little used?
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On Mon, 06 May 2019 09:30:55 +0100, alan_m wrote:

You can buy winter wheels for caravans for just that reason/purpose. They're also a good anti-theft device.
I made two for our van out of a couple of scrap rims and some angle iron welded into a triangle.
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wrote:

Well, other than they can develop a 'flat spot', I'm not sure.
When I've not driven the kit car for a while I can feel the 'flat spots' (you can sometimes even see the effects of them when driving very slowly) in the tyre but they seem to smooth out after a little time in use.
Cheers, T i m
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On 05/05/2019 17:22, Jethro_uk wrote:

How much does it matter with a caravan or trailer? That is a genuine question.
The one on my parents' caravan was only noticed as the van was not level side to side and the one on my trailer wasn't actually a blowout, it was failure of a brand-new suspension unit that fired the hub and wheel off into a field and again was only noticeable by the side to side tilt in the mirror. Both occurred at speed and neither had any effect on control.
The one on my father's car (Mk 4 Cortina, rear, nearside) gave a bit of mild shimmying, we just pulled onto the hard-shoulder and changed the wheel; the one on my friends' car (Mk 2 Fiesta, rear, can't remember which side) had them into the central reservation, backwards.
I don't know any statistics or other people's experiences, but my limited experience has been that trailer/caravan blowouts/loss of wheel have been pretty well non-events. Something to avoid if possible, but not frightening or affecting control.
SteveW
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Steve Walker wrote:

I have had a number of caravan blowouts over many years, In each case control was not affected, but the tyre disintegrated completely.
My previous (very) old van had enough clearance to survive this, on more than one occasion.
Nowadays, with coil spring suspension a thing of the past, replaced by low travel rubber torsion devices, things are so tight that a shredded tyre will almost certainly destroy the plastic wheel arch and possibly take out some of the woodwork. All the main services generally run just over the wheel arch, so those would probably get damaged as well. That could seriously spoil your day. :-(
I last replaced the caravan tyres, when they were 7 years old*, even though they were low mileage, there was still lots of tread (The spare had never even been used) and no visible problems. The risk is too great. The upside is that I think modern vans use better rated tyres.
*I think that means that I am due a new set next year. :-(
Chris
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I think the commonest cause of blowouts is loss of tyre pressure, either through not checking them before you start or through an unnoticed leak whilst driving. It takes a lot to make a tyre completely fail but driving at speed on an under-inflated tyre will do it. ;-)
Only ever had one blowout in 45 years of driving cars, motor homes and towing caravans and it was undoubtably due to youthful ignorance and lack of maintenance.
Tim
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In article

Quite. Far more common than a tyre blowing through age. If the tyre is well under pressure and driven at speed it overheats through flexing. But you'd need to be a pretty unsympathetic driver not to notice it was that low in pressure.
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Hard to notice on a towed trailer though...
Tim
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On 06/05/2019 15:19, Tim+ wrote:

Hard to notice on a rented van you've never driven before either.
DAMHIK...
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A number? In over 30 years I've never had one. (Famous last words.) What do you do to your tyres?

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bert

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bert wrote:

OK, I think it was three in total. Two of them on the same journey where a badly signed temporary road surface caught me out with a sharp step in the tarmac apparently doing damage that later proved terminal.
Only one spare, so the second one needed assistance.
Chris
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I've never heard of this, it much depends on usage and how people drive and what they drive on and if the car is set up correctly according to my driving friends. As an aside I notice a lot of commercials on Scottish Internet stations for remoulds. I thought this practice had been seen as possibly suspect, since the bonding can never be as good as the original. Brian
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Colway used to make very decent remoulds. Because they ain't popular, they could be very choosy about the carcass they used. Only real downside was they needed more balancing than a decent new tyre. But they ceased trading.
My brother was a big fan of them. He reckoned a better performance than a budget new tyre for a lot less cost.
I had a set on the SD1. And apart from the balance thingie, no complaints. They were quiet, and gripped well in the wet. I'd happily have bought another set.
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Scott wrote:

I don't know if it's 5 years, or a bigger number, but I've heard of it (especially on trailers where the often do low mileage, so have plenty of tread remaining).
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On Sun, 05 May 2019 11:51:10 +0100, Scott wrote:

New set of tyres for my car won't last 5 years before they are worn out. Might get 30 to 35,000 miles or 2 to 2 1/2 years.
Surpriseds mentioned oxygen attacking the compound. Thought that was the reason some places highlight nitrogen, rather than air, inflation.
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The main reason for them is to get money from your bank account into theirs.
Nitrogen permeates through rubber slower than air but for ordinary day to day car use it won’t make an appreciable difference over the period you should be checking pressures anyway. I suppose kids in Novas and Seats get a kick from thinking they have an affinity with an F1 racing car if they have used it.
GH
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