OT - anyone any good with computers?

On Sun, 19 Jun 2011 10:49:28 +0100, Tim Watts wrote:

You will almost certainly have to go through the Windows Update loop several times. I reinstalled SWMBO'd Vista machine the other month as it threw a wobbly with some updates and refused to apply some. Windows Update support couldn't sort it out and it came down to a reinstall. Be aware that if the orginal disc/recovery partition is old the updates will pull down around a Gigabyte of data and it will take the best part of a day.
Even more annoyingly the first run will find 50 or 60 to apply, totaling sevral hundred MB, then on the second or third pass through the loop it will find a Vista Cumulative Update again several hundred MB. WTF doesn't it find that first! Oh and after that there is probably a "service pack" again several hundred MB...

Why paid for? Avast! works well enough here (free for home use). AVG Free seems to have got sensible again after it became slow and insisted on downloading all pages related to search results.
--
Cheers
Dave.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Liquorice wrote:

I've had good results with Microsoft Security Essentials on WinXP and Win7, it seems to be pretty unobtrusive (why do all AV products have to turn into bloatware every few years?) it usually get updates several times a day, and is free.
You could argue it is trusting the poacher to act as the gamekeeper, but so far, I've no complaints in using it, oh ... except that it won't update its definitions through a proxy server, but even then Windows Update seems to fetch the definitions on its behalf, just not so frequently.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You will find that some patches require earlier ones to be installed first and many more are to correct the new bugs introduced by earlier bug fixes. You can also use 'Nlite' with your original Windows disk and a downloaded copy of the most recent service pack to "slipstream" them into a disk that installs the latest version. That drastically cuts down the updating time. http://www.nliteos.com/download.html (ignore the big ad in the middle of the page).

Having said that, it is worth checking your ISP and/or bank. many now give away the paid for versions with free licences. E.g. Barclays give out Kaspersky Internet Security with three free licences to their online customers and HSBC also have an offering.
--
Tinkerer



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Liquorice wrote:

i had quite forgotten how utterly useless windoz can be after one careless click of a mouse button.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd use a Mac. Oh. I already do.
--
Tim

"That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Knoppix Linux can also be downloaded for free (on a borrowed computer) and burnt to a bootable CD, though latest versions need a DVD. When run from a CD it can't do any further corruption of your HD files but with a bit of luck will read them off.
Alternatively take HDD out of the computer and plug it into a USB adaptor gadget, such as Maplin sell, plug this into the USB port of a borrowed computer, run Windows file recovery program on 2nd computer. Many of these disk adaptor gadgets only work with SATA drives these days (even if they do claim IDE compatibility). Better still, before starting, make a bit image of the whole corrupted HDD onto a 2nd drive to analyse at leisure with no risk.
rusty
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Take the hard drive out and connect it to another machine as a secondary drive. If the drive is working you should be able to recover all the files. It may only be the operating system that is corrupt and preventing you from accessing the data.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And if it's a secondary disk on windows you will probably need to run 'Disk Management' (found under administrative tools, computer management on vista) to make the disk show up. I know of one person who almost wrote off thier data when one shop pronounced the disk as dead when it didn't show up under windows initially
Martin
Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Dale wrote:

And likely infect the second machine.

There's a lot of technically correct, but practically dubious advice being given, considering that normal people don't know much about the workings of a PC ... especially being thrown in at the deep end when there's already a problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19/06/2011 11:39, Andy Burns wrote:

Shouldn't do, not if the host machine is clean and you don't run any execuable code from the secondary drive.

That's true.
Given the level of knowledge the OP has demonstrated, the only solution for them is to find someone competent who can physically have access to the machine.
- R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is no reason why it should. You have to run something for it to do anything. The AV software on the machine should catch it if you did accidently run something.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dennis@home wrote:

Such as if the virus had dropped an autorun.inf file onto the root of the system volume ... or infected a few .doc files with macros, which someone then opens to check if they're the ones they want to recover?

You assume the virus protection on the second machine is better than the original machine ...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Neither vista nor win7 will run them unless you tell them.

AV software will find them.

Its unlikely to be worse.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dennis@home wrote:

If the O/P has an old PC, it's hardly likely to have a newer O/S on it. If they have a friend, it's more likely to be XP than Win7.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Its vista as the OP stated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Look on the bright side - you just learned the value of regular backups!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have back ups of most documents. Its the loss of all my music files and all my e mails and connections thats the problem. Something like going back to 2008. Its also the loss of the software ( it was a media centre and I don't have any of the disks for it. As I said it was a one off installation job.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
sweetheart wrote:

On the email note - next time, do NOT use POP as your mail conection, use IMAP.
POP relies on downloading the email to your PC. IMAP keeps it on the server, nicely organised into folders the way you want. a) You can point a phone or Pad at the same IMAP server from anywhere and see yoru email; b) When this happens, you don't lose your email (unless the virus was a nasty one specifically designed to destroy remote mail via outlook).
--
Tim Watts

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

on a side note you email data will likely be in C:\Users\your user name \AppData\Local (probably \Microsoft\Outlook or \Microsoft\Windows Mail \
Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most pop3 email progs allow you to change the location of the storage folder. I always put mine in a folder within My Documents; that way they get backed up with everything else. I can also highly recommend this free backup program written by a guy at Kiel University. I have used it for some time and find it indispensable. The only point is that, in the task settings, you should set timeout to zero, otherwise large files will timeout unnecessarily. Here is a link: http://personal-backup.rathlev-home.de/index-e.html
--
Tinkerer



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.